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image from Homestead, PA in 1915


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I have been having an enjoyable time taking in what there is to see on this image from Homestead, PA in 1915 and linked below...
 
 
Zoom in to the image and have a look.
 
Nearest the camera, BR&P composite gon 17485, is in the process of being loaded. The load bracing is partially in place, the vertical braces positioned in the OUTSIDE stake pockets.
 
Behind it is a B&O composite gon that has completed loading of the same material. Note that the B&O gon has vertical braces positioned both inside the car AND on the outside, using the outside stake pockets. I imagine this was done to provide a tight and secure non-shifting interior fit for the load.
 
Are these called billets in the steel industry? The appear to be octagonal in profile
 
Then further to the left we can see a steel gon with C.S.CO. reporting marks, I am unable to make out the number. It appears this car might be missing its coupler.
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Dennis Storzek
 

What catches my eye is the early interlocking steel sheet piling lining the excavations in the foreground. Here is a brief history quoted from this web site:
https://jdfieldsusa.wordpress.com/2015/03/07/history-of-sheet-piling/

"A manufacturer from the United States, Gregson, was the first to patent a bulb and jaw interlock in 1899 but this system still did not serve its intended purpose because it resulted in a flat section with a tiny section modulus. This then led to the first steel sheet pile with a U section and riveted interlocks being developed by Tryggve Larssen, the state chief engineer for the city of Bremen in Germany, at the turn of the century. Larssen’s wave shaped sheet pile was a revolutionary development because it increased the strength and efficiency of steel retaining walls. However, this design still contained an interlock system that was partially fabricated after the manufacturing process. In 1914, sheet pile with rivet-less interlocking systems made their debut in Germany. Sheet pile that has been developed since Larssen’s innovation have been based of his design concept."

Dennis Storzek


Alex Huff
 

The BR&P gon has what I think are "safety chains" on the end sill.  Three links are to the right of the coupler, two links and a hook are to the left.  Was this "system" ever an industry requirement?  If not, how widespread was it?  When was it discontinued or least no longer maintained.
   


Eric Hansmann
 

Mill gondolas had drop-door ends to haul loads that were longer than the car. These may extend onto another car with a bearing plate for the load to ride upon. The chains are a safety to keep the cars together in case of coupler failure.

 

I don’t know if the chain connections were a requirement for these loads. In reviewing the Loading of Materials section of the 1919 Car Builder Directory, I do not see the chain connections noted with loads spanning multiple cars.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alex Huff
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 11:53 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] image from Homestead, PA in 1915

 

The BR&P gon has what I think are "safety chains" on the end sill.  Three links are to the right of the coupler, two links and a hook are to the left.  Was this "system" ever an industry requirement?  If not, how widespread was it?  When was it discontinued or least no longer maintained.
   


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Sep 5, 2020 at 11:44 AM, Eric Hansmann wrote:
I don’t know if the chain connections were a requirement for these loads. In reviewing the Loading of Materials section of the 1919 Car Builder Directory, I do not see the chain connections noted with loads spanning multiple cars.
Someplace in there was a requirement that multiple cars under one load either be chained together or have the uncoupling mechanism made inoperative; the intent being to keep someone from mindlessly uncoupling the cars and dropping the load. I suspect roads that supplied cars for long loads often just figured they'd save time and expense over the long run if they just built the cars with permanent chains.

Dennis Storzek