Topics

Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof


Tom Madden
 

The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Tom, I doubt a GN car would have the word NORTHE . . . stenciled on the side . . .

 

But other than that, I think it’s interesting that the boards making up the roof have two grooves milled into them, one along each edge, and are alternated so that whatever water goes through the joints of the upper layer has a good chance of getting into the grooves of the lower layer and then draining out.

 

Seemed like a good design at the time . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 06, 2020 3:07 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof

 

The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden


Tom Madden
 

On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 01:54 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Tom, I doubt a GN car would have the word NORTHE . . . stenciled on the side . . .

 

Ummmm....

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/images/uploads/10403_77010_full_1.jpg

Tom Madden

 

 


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, OK, MAYBE . . .  😊

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 06, 2020 4:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof

 

On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 01:54 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Tom, I doubt a GN car would have the word NORTHE . . . stenciled on the side . . .

 

Ummmm....

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/images/uploads/10403_77010_full_1.jpg

Tom Madden

 

 


Eric Hansmann
 

A very nice view if the double-board roof. Now I wonder how many lines used these double-grooved boards to channel water away.

 

Thanks, Tom!

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 6, 2020 2:07 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof

 

The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 12:07 PM, Tom Madden wrote:
Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof,
Tom, that's the classic double board roof used by lots of roads in that era. Milwaukee Road was another big user. The rabbets milled on the face of the board are actually intended to act like gutters, diverting most of the water away from the crack between the boards. What did go through the crack ended up in the middle of the board below, and there was another gutter before it could seep to the crack between the boards on that layer. Was it perfect? No, but it was cheap, and effective enough that it remained in use on stockcars long after other car types had universally gone to metal roofs. I guess cattle are by their nature waterproof, and there is not much chance they will shrink.

Dennis Storzek


ROGER HINMAN
 

Note the “Nothern” in the photo is much closer to the end of the car,

Roger Hinman


On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:02 PM, Tom Madden via groups.io <pullmanboss@...> wrote:

On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 01:54 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Tom, I doubt a GN car would have the word NORTHE . . . stenciled on the side . . .
 
Ummmm....

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/images/uploads/10403_77010_full_1.jpg

Tom Madden

 

 



Jeff Helm
 

Those lumber stacks look like they could be plywood veneer.  They look like sheets or panels rather than individual boards and there appear to be spacers to allow drying.  One would expect those to ship in a boxcar, if not processed on site.
--
Jeff Helm
Bremerton WA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 02:11 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
Those lumber stacks look like they could be plywood veneer.
Not much plywood production in 1900, that had to wait for better glues. Meanwhile labor was cheap, and even stacks kept the boards from twisting as they dried. This is classic air drying before planing, quite common in Wisconsin, too. Every layer of boards is placed on "stickers" to promote airflow through the stack. You'll also want to note the boards allowed to stick out every dozen or so layers; these provided a stairway of sorts for the guys who worked the top of the stack, both while building it and taking it down later.

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 


I think the Northern gives it away. ;-)

What is that wood pattern on the car sides called? It doesn't look like board by board siding. Novelty siding maybe?


On 11/6/2020 3:07 PM, Tom Madden via groups.io wrote:
The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

We've talked about a number of times, It is called Vee center Vee. The board are milled so that there is both a vee at the joint and a vee in center of the board.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn,AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 7, 2020 7:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof
 

I think the Northern gives it away. ;-)

What is that wood pattern on the car sides called? It doesn't look like board by board siding. Novelty siding maybe?


On 11/6/2020 3:07 PM, Tom Madden via groups.io wrote:
The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 

Bruce

I was thinking it might be "beaded" siding - it didn't look like a vee to mee.


On 11/7/2020 8:41 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:
Tim,

We've talked about a number of times, It is called Vee center Vee. The board are milled so that there is both a vee at the joint and a vee in center of the board.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn,AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 7, 2020 7:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof
 

I think the Northern gives it away. ;-)

What is that wood pattern on the car sides called? It doesn't look like board by board siding. Novelty siding maybe?


On 11/6/2020 3:07 PM, Tom Madden via groups.io wrote:
The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


John Barry
 

No Schuyler,

It SEAMED like a good idea.  




Seriously, I was impressed by the detail of the roof construction.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 






On Friday, November 6, 2020, 03:54:10 PM EST, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:


Tom, I doubt a GN car would have the word NORTHE . . . stenciled on the side . . .

 

But other than that, I think it’s interesting that the boards making up the roof have two grooves milled into them, one along each edge, and are alternated so that whatever water goes through the joints of the upper layer has a good chance of getting into the grooves of the lower layer and then draining out.

 

Seemed like a good design at the time . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 06, 2020 3:07 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof

 

The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


I actually felt the concept was pretty groovy...
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
From: John Barry
Sent: Saturday, November 07, 2020 10:05 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof

No Schuyler,

It SEAMED like a good idea.  




Seriously, I was impressed by the detail of the roof construction.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 






On Friday, November 6, 2020, 03:54:10 PM EST, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:


Tom, I doubt a GN car would have the word NORTHE . . . stenciled on the side . . .

 

But other than that, I think it’s interesting that the boards making up the roof have two grooves milled into them, one along each edge, and are alternated so that whatever water goes through the joints of the upper layer has a good chance of getting into the grooves of the lower layer and then draining out.

 

Seemed like a good design at the time . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 06, 2020 3:07 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting 1900-ish boxcar roof

 

The attached photo is in the current issue of a historical society publication from my home area in northeastern PA. (Scan courtesy of the editor.) The caption states "Sam Nevin in Columbia Township, Flathead County, Montana". Sam was a sawmill laborer who arrived there in 1900 and by 1910 was back in PA. Interesting pattern in the wood sheathed roof, and look at how neat those stacks of lumber are. Probably a GN car as that's GN country.

Tom Madden


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

No “Maybe” about it, Schuyler. Many earlier GN cars had Great Northern written out on the left side

of the door. If I’m not mistaken even some with early use of the billy goat herald had this feature.

Take a look at the GN’s USRA double sheathed cars to see this.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine