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Interesting load on a SAL flat

Brian Termunde
 

On one of my Milwaukee Road lists, the attached photo was shared. He was interested in the load, any ideas?

Thanks!

Take care

Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT

Bill Daniels
 

They are watertube boilers. Similar to marine boilers. They are the opposite of firetube boilers which were commonly used on steam locomotives where the combustion gasses go through the tubes and water surrounds the tube. In these, the water/steam is inside the tubes, while the fire is outside them. In operation, these are much safer than firetube boilers. And, before you ask, several roads did experiment with watertube (or a hybrid design) boilers... unsucessfully. The B&O was the major road that used a variety of them, but other roads did experiment (including the PRR). The big advantage of firetube boilers in locomotives was the large reservior of water in the boiler that was at the boiling point for the pressure inside the boiler would respond instantaniously to a lowering of pressure inside the boiler due to increased steam demand. Lowering the pressure caused more water to flash to steam without the crew's action. This was valuable in locomotive use, but not so much so in other, steady-state applications.

Bill Daniels 
Santa Rosa, CA


On Sunday, November 17, 2019, 11:13:10 AM PST, Brian Termunde via Groups.Io <gcrds@...> wrote:


On one of my Milwaukee Road lists, the attached photo was shared. He was interested in the load, any ideas?

Thanks!

Take care

Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT

Brian Termunde
 

Well that was FAST! Thank you Bill!

Take care
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT

Bill Daniels
 

Well, it does help to be sitting in front of my computer when your request came in... Emoji

Bill Daniels 
Santa Rosa, CA


On Sunday, November 17, 2019, 11:34:01 AM PST, Brian Termunde via Groups.Io <gcrds@...> wrote:


Well that was FAST! Thank you Bill!

Take care
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT

Fritz Milhaupt
 

Here's an earlier version of a water tube boiler on a flat car, from Saginaw, Michigan in 1895.

The Flint & Pere Marquette was one of the predecessors to the Pere Marquette, which owned the second flat car in the photo at the top of this thread.

- Fritz Milhaupt

Charlie Vlk
 

All-

I wonder how far that excess height load got before taking out a wagon bridge or wires crossing the track??

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Fritz Milhaupt via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 4:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting load on a SAL flat

 

Here's an earlier version of a water tube boiler on a flat car, from Saginaw, Michigan in 1895.

The Flint & Pere Marquette was one of the predecessors to the Pere Marquette, which owned the second flat car in the photo at the top of this thread.

- Fritz Milhaupt

Brian Termunde
 

Fritz,
Thanks for sharing!

Take care,

Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT

D. Scott Chatfield
 

There was an annual publication titled "Official Railway Clearances Guide" from the same folks that printed the ORG and the ORER.  its purpose was to show the vertical and horizontal clearances of each stretch of line in North America.  Every significant agency had a copy and I'm sure that every shipper who originated high & wide loads also had one.

Scott Chatfield