Interesting three dome tank car St Louis 23rd St yard


Charlie Duckworth
 

I’m finishing up a book for the Missouri Pacific Historical Society based on photos from the Joe Collias collection the society bought in September 2018.  This morning I was looking through some 35mm shots that Wayne Leeman took while riding a freight between Jefferson City and St Louis in 1940.  I enlarged a shot he took of the St Louis yards and this odd three dome tank car appeared with two small domes and a large one in the middle section. 
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Tim O'Connor
 


a couple more examples


On 9/20/2021 12:47 PM, Charlie Duckworth wrote:
I’m finishing up a book for the Missouri Pacific Historical Society based on photos from the Joe Collias collection the society bought in September 2018.  This morning I was looking through some 35mm shots that Wayne Leeman took while riding a freight between Jefferson City and St Louis in 1940.  I enlarged a shot he took of the St Louis yards and this odd three dome tank car appeared with two small domes and a large one in the middle section. 
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

Attachments:




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tony Thompson
 

These kinds of rebuilt tank cars to get more compartments were very common in the wine-car fleet, though this particular car does not look like one of them.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Steve and Barb Hile
 

I was not unusual for GATX and UTLX to repurpose single compartment tank cars into two or three compartments by putting in extra heads to separate compartments.  You can see the rivet lines for two internal heads, one just beyond the first small dome and on just shy of the large center dome.  The other end would be similar.

 

If I read the car number as GATX 1331, we see these values in the 1955 GATX section of the tank car tariff (thanks to Ian Cranstone)

 

 

So, this was, probably, originally, a 10,000 gallon tank with a 432 gallon center dome.  After the remodeling, it had 3 approximately 2700 gallon compartments, two of which have 125 gallon domes.  This is probably a good match for the photo.

 

Extra credit:  At least the near compartment has internal heating coils, as evidenced by the two pipes coming through the head near the running board.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 11:47 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interesting three dome tank car St Louis 23rd St yard

 

I’m finishing up a book for the Missouri Pacific Historical Society based on photos from the Joe Collias collection the society bought in September 2018.  This morning I was looking through some 35mm shots that Wayne Leeman took while riding a freight between Jefferson City and St Louis in 1940.  I enlarged a shot he took of the St Louis yards and this odd three dome tank car appeared with two small domes and a large one in the middle section. 
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Charlie Duckworth
 

Thanks for all the replies. 
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Bob Chaparro
 

Are we calling these cars three dome tank cars or three compartment tank cars?

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Are we calling these cars three dome tank cars or three compartment tank cars?
Depends if you’re engineering-oriented or a model railroader.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Steve and Barb Hile
 

Compartments is a better choice, IMHO.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 11:16 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Interesting three dome tank car St Louis 23rd St yard

 

Are we calling these cars three dome tank cars or three compartment tank cars?

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Tim O'Connor
 


I disagree Tony. A 3 dome car USUALLY has 3 compartments, but a 3 compartment tank car does not
necessarily have 3 domes. And construction of no-dome cars began well before the end of the STMFC era.

Tim O'Connor

On 9/21/2021 1:21 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Bob Chaparro wrote:

Are we calling these cars three dome tank cars or three compartment tank cars?
Depends if you’re engineering-oriented or a model railroader.

Tony Thompson
tony@...








--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

I disagree Tony. A 3 dome car USUALLY has 3 compartments, but a 3 compartment tank car does not
necessarily have 3 domes. And construction of no-dome cars began well before the end of the STMFC era.

Not sure I get your point. If we are interested in what freight cars DO, then the compartments matter, and the domes don’t. If you are just a car-spotter or collector of train models, I guess the number of domes would be the visual marker you would want.

Tony Thompson



Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

That's absurd. If domes had no purpose, they would not be there. They certainly do matter.

Tim

On 9/21/2021 2:54 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:

I disagree Tony. A 3 dome car USUALLY has 3 compartments, but a 3 compartment tank car does not
necessarily have 3 domes. And construction of no-dome cars began well before the end of the STMFC era.

Not sure I get your point. If we are interested in what freight cars DO, then the compartments matter, and the domes don’t. If you are just a car-spotter or collector of train models, I guess the number of domes would be the visual marker you would want.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Tony
That's absurd. If domes had no purpose, they would not be there. They certainly do matter.
As usual, you ignore my point. The car exists to carry cargo. It does so in its compartments. Yes, Tim, OF COURSE it had domes (back in the day). Guess what, it had trucks, couplers., underframe, all kindza stuff to help do its job. That was never in dispute. But if a person chooses to focus on the USE of the car, it’s about the cargo.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


D. Scott Chatfield
 

While some multi _manway_ single compartment tank cars have been built since 1960, for phosphorus for instance, I can't recall ever seeing a multi _dome_ single compartment tank car.  Can't say that such did not exist, but if such did exist I'd love to see a photo.  

This is not to say that all the compartments of a multi-compartment tank could not be used for the same product.  Probably happened a lot during the war years.

Yes, dome-less non-pressure tanks (spec ICC-111) were built before 1960, first by Union Tank in 1956 IIRC, they were not by any means common until after 1960.

Scott Chatfield


Tim O'Connor
 


more to the point dome-less pressure tanks were built decades earlier
although whether any of them were multi-compartment I don't know


On 9/21/2021 10:22 PM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:
While some multi _manway_ single compartment tank cars have been built since 1960, for phosphorus for instance, I can't recall ever seeing a multi _dome_ single compartment tank car.  Can't say that such did not exist, but if such did exist I'd love to see a photo.  

This is not to say that all the compartments of a multi-compartment tank could not be used for the same product.  Probably happened a lot during the war years.

Yes, dome-less non-pressure tanks (spec ICC-111) were built before 1960, first by Union Tank in 1956 IIRC, they were not by any means common until after 1960.

Scott Chatfield



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts