Journal Oil Modeling - was "Resemble Grease"


Matt Goodman
 

Jim, like Brian Stokes, I’ve been experimenting with simulating plain-bearing journal (and wheel face) oiliness for a couple years. I had better luck with the latter, until last July when a mistake unrelated to trucks led to a method for journal boxes that I *am* satisfied with, and is reasonably quick. 

  1. Base layer of MIG Engine Grime
  2. Top coat of Tamiya Panel Line Accent (Black, in my case) 

The second supplies the oily gloss, the first provides a lighter under color and just a bit of texture to make the oily sheen stand out.
The base layer might work with another material, but I’ll stick with this combination until I better understand what makes it work, then start some experimentation - especially given that the MIG products were hard to get before COVID slowed things down more from Spain. The next experiment will likely be with MIG engine oil.

@Brian Stokes, I’ll be interested to hear what you find with the Vallejo acrylics. I saw some in stock at a hobby shop last summer, but held off buying any until I had a firm opinion about the MIG enamels.

The attached photo has my good-enough oily wheel face - Tamiya German Gray. I’ve developed methods that I’m happy with aesthetically for wheel faces, but they aren’t fast (and/or are very messy). The second photo shows the products - ignore the oil wash, that’s used for different purposes where a very dry look is needed (spring packs, for instance).

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On May 6, 2021, at 8:40 PM, Jim Sabol <jimsabol@...> wrote:

would best represent the greasy look under the switch points of a well maintained turnout; or around journal boxes, for that matter? Thanks.



Tony Thompson
 

Matt Goodman wrote:

The attached photo has my good-enough oily wheel face - Tamiya German Gray. 

    I have settled on this same color for wheel faces. From my own observations and from photos, the wheel face should NOT be dead black. And remember that the oil spillage was a dust and dirt magnet. Whatever color it is, it ought not to be glossy, IMO. I have worried far less about the inside faces of wheels (Richard Hendrickson had a "dirty rust" color for those areas), because one can rarely see them.

Tony Thompson




Jim Sabol
 

Boy, am I glad that I asked the original question! You guys amaze me with your knowledge.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Matt Goodman
 

I made a mistake - Tamiya NATO Black is my good-enough wheel face color for the oily look. Especially for (but not limited to) coal hoppers where the overwhelming dust would be coal dust. NATO Black contains a hint of green, which reminds me of grease/oil gunk color (see attached). For variety, I use it alongside (and mixed with German Gray) and some powder/paint concoctions for wheel faces.

German Gray is my black truck color. It’s light enough to allow the beautifully detailed trucks to stand out from the shadows (second and third photos).


Matt 

On May 14, 2021, at 4:03 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Matt Goodman wrote:

The attached photo has my good-enough oily wheel face - Tamiya German Gray. 

    I have settled on this same color for wheel faces. From my own observations and from photos, the wheel face should NOT be dead black. And remember that the oil spillage was a dust and dirt magnet. Whatever color it is, it ought not to be glossy, IMO. I have worried far less about the inside faces of wheels (Richard Hendrickson had a "dirty rust" color for those areas), because one can rarely see them.

Tony Thompson





Brian Stokes
 

I'm away from home for the next couple of days and don't have a well-lit image available, but because I am working in Proto:48 I dust a bit of powdered chalk onto the wet wheel faces to get a bit of texture on them. Some of the Vallejo weathering products even have a bit of texture that might work depending on the scale you're working in. I'm modelling the west coast and mostly western roads so I tend to have a bit more dust in my weathering. Like Tony T said, the grease is a magnet for dirt...

--
Brian Stokes
North Point Street in Proto:48


Nelson Moyer
 

There's an exception to most definitive statements, and I ran across this one while looking at MDT reefers. The wheel faces appear black to a very dark bluish gray, more like a oily black. I concede that they may not be true black, but they're more black than gray.


Tim O'Connor
 


It's not the OIL so much as the dirt that sticks to the oil. In many photos from more arid
areas of the United States, the wheel faces were often a tan or reddish color from sand and
fine local dirt colors. I have observed up close almost an inch of crud accumulated on the
face of a wheel. If all of your wheel faces are the same color it's no different than all of your
cars having the same weathering.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/15/2021 11:07 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
There's an exception to most definitive statements, and I ran across this one while looking at MDT reefers. The wheel faces appear black to a very dark bluish gray, more like a oily black. I concede that they may not be true black, but they're more black than gray.

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Matt Goodman
 

An interesting story I heard from a railroader was regarding the “brake smoke” that was generated when descending a long grade. I assumed this was some mix of ballast dust and brake shoe dust. The railroader said it was burning oil - all that oily gunk on the wheel faces would cook off as the wheels got hot - followed by the gunk spalling off the wheel face. The latter explains the flaking look I’ve seen in person and in photos. 

He said it smelled terrible.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On May 16, 2021, at 8:35 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


It's not the OIL so much as the dirt that sticks to the oil. In many photos from more arid
areas of the United States, the wheel faces were often a tan or reddish color from sand and
fine local dirt colors. I have observed up close almost an inch of crud accumulated on the
face of a wheel. If all of your wheel faces are the same color it's no different than all of your
cars having the same weathering.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/15/2021 11:07 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
There's an exception to most definitive statements, and I ran across this one while looking at MDT reefers. The wheel faces appear black to a very dark bluish gray, more like a oily black. I concede that they may not be true black, but they're more black than gray.

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts