Topics

Kewanee boiler flat car load


Tom Madden
 

A couple weeks ago this HO Type C Kewanee boiler showed up as something "You may also be interested in..." when I checked eBay. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/303673005802

For only $15 (plus tax) and free shipping, I went for one. It arrived yesterday. The attached photos show it compared to a smaller boiler previously offered by Resin Car Works. It's 3D printed and shows the same faint diagonal build lines as Corey Bonsall's D&RGW gondola models. The seller (and I have no connection to him/them at all) has many other industrial-type loads in several scales. Appears to be a pretty tough and durable material. The seller also has a Shapeways store but the models there are more expensive and built with Shapeways' sintered nylon process, which leaves a more granular surface.

The flat car is a WestRail model.

Tom Madden


Tony Thompson
 

Tom Madden wrote:

A couple weeks ago this HO Type C Kewanee boiler showed up as something "You may also be interested in..." when I checked eBay. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/303673005802

The flat car is a WestRail model.

      I really don't think that flat car is WestRail. 

Tony Thompson




WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I bought some of these boilers direct f0rom the company.  They make great loads

Bill Pardie

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Tom Madden via groups.io" <pullmanboss@...>
Date: 12/9/20 8:23 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

A couple weeks ago this HO Type C Kewanee boiler showed up as something "You may also be interested in..." when I checked eBay. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/303673005802

For only $15 (plus tax) and free shipping, I went for one. It arrived yesterday. The attached photos show it compared to a smaller boiler previously offered by Resin Car Works. It's 3D printed and shows the same faint diagonal build lines as Corey Bonsall's D&RGW gondola models. The seller (and I have no connection to him/them at all) has many other industrial-type loads in several scales. Appears to be a pretty tough and durable material. The seller also has a Shapeways store but the models there are more expensive and built with Shapeways' sintered nylon process, which leaves a more granular surface.

The flat car is a WestRail model.

Tom Madden


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Tom,

Any idea about what one of those puppies weighed and/or during what time period they were manufactured?

Thanks,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

-----------------------------------------

From: "Tom Madden via groups.io"
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday December 9 2020 1:23:47PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

A couple weeks ago this HO Type C Kewanee boiler showed up as something "You may also be interested in..." when I checked eBay. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/303673005802

For only $15 (plus tax) and free shipping, I went for one. It arrived yesterday. The attached photos show it compared to a smaller boiler previously offered by Resin Car Works. It's 3D printed and shows the same faint diagonal build lines as Corey Bonsall's D&RGW gondola models. The seller (and I have no connection to him/them at all) has many other industrial-type loads in several scales. Appears to be a pretty tough and durable material. The seller also has a Shapeways store but the models there are more expensive and built with Shapeways' sintered nylon process, which leaves a more granular surface.

The flat car is a WestRail model.

Tom Madden


Allen Cain
 

I do not know what they weighed but I do know that if you ask multiscaledigitial they may have the info for their's.  I recently bought a casting for a flat car load and they can tell the cubic inches of resin used to print the item.  Then take that number and for HO scale multiply it by 87 x 87 x 87 x the density of steel  (about .3 pounds per cubic inch IIRC) and you have a nice approximation for the prototype weight.  They posted the estimated weight on their site for the item I was needing.

Now this works only for items that were solid steel.  For something like a boiler made of sheet metal and tubes with lots of interior voids this would not work.

Allen Cain


Peter Hall
 

Here is a download from the Kewanee Boiler History page:

Kewanee Boiler History

Kewanee Boiler in the Museum 

Among the many exhibits at the Kewanee Historical Society’s Robert and Marcella Richards Museum is one devoted to the name that has brought more recognition to Kewanee over the years than any other—Kewanee Boiler Company.

The focus point of the Boiler display is a large (8 by 4 foot) picture of the Boiler complex as it looked in 1926, when it contained 13 acres of buildings on a site of 33 acres.  The beautifully-framed picture hung near the entrance to the Boiler main office building at 101 Franklin St.  It was donated by Burnham Industries when they closed Kewanee Boiler in 2002.

The Boiler exhibit includes several hundred pictures of the plant, inside and out, and of employees ranging from President E.E. Baker to riveter boys, and, of course, of boilers of all sizes.

The display includes a variety of artifacts and memorabilia, including miniature boilers and numerous scrapbooks of news articles and publications and documents produced by the company.

Another feature is sales brochures from many years, beginning in the 1890s, some of which were added to the collection last fall when items from the estate of Brule Carleson, long-time Kewanee Boiler employee, were donated to the museum.

Especially interesting is a file of World War II Civil Defense clearance reports on several hundred employees, including identification pictures.  Equally interesting are some 1945 company newsletters featuring items on the everyday lives of employees, as well as news about the company.

If you come to the museum to see the Boiler exhibit, and we hope you will, here is some background on Kewanee Boiler Company.

History

A business with the name “Kewanee Boiler Company” began in 1892, but throughout the 1900s when Kewanee Boiler had an anniversary celebration or commemoration, the company marked its beginning as 1868.

The historical explanation for that begins in 1868 when a man named Valerius Anderson started a company in Kewanee to make steam heating devices to heat animal feed.  By 1871 Anderson Steam Heater, as it was called, began making steam boilers for homes and businesses.

In 1875 Anderson moved on but his infant company remained in Kewanee under the ownership of William Haxtun, who had been an employee and would take the company from about 30 employees to over 1,000 in 1891.

The success of Haxtun Steam Heater Company was based on Haxtun’s patent of a new type of boiler in 1875, adding the manufacture of tubes, pipes and valves in the 1880s, and bringing into the company two soon-to-be industrial giants—John Pierce and E. E. Baker.

Haxtun retired in 1891 and sold his share of the business to National Tube Company of McKeesport, Pennsylvania.  The company name was changed from Haxtun Steam Heater to Western Tube Company.

The name change to “Tube Company” indicated that the company was going to concentrate on producing tubes, pipes and valves.  In fact, Western Tube decided to discontinue the production of boilers.

In stepped E. E. Baker, number 2 in the Tube Company behind John Pierce, who along with a number of associates purchased the boiler portion of the business and in 1892 established Kewanee Boiler Company.

Kewanee Boiler remained in the old boiler shops on the east side of Main Street just south of the railroad tracks.  Expecting to remain there for some time, the new company built a two-story brick building on Main Street just south of the boiler shops to house its administrative offices. (See photo)

But business must have been good and the young company made the gamble that paid off for a century as in 1900 they moved to a new facility approximately one mile to the west on the north side of the railroad tracks.  Here Kewanee Boiler would remain and grow until its demise in the late 1900s and finally closing in 2002.

Highlights of Boiler history include the development of a “smokeless” boiler in 1906, a million dollar addition to the plant in 1920 and major contributions to the war effort in both World War I and II.

E.E. Baker would continue to be president of the company until his death on January 1, 1929.  Before his death he would become Kewanee’s premier benefactor, contributing a great deal of money and leadership to the formation and development of Kewanee Park District.  He was president of the district’s board of commissioners from its inception in 1920 to 1929, during which time the district developed Northeast Park, Chatauqua Park and, of course, Baker Park.

Returning to the 1890s, Western Tube Company would thrive under the leadership of John Pierce.  By 1906 production of tubes, pipes and valves was so great that it required over 4,000 employees.  However, that was the peak as a recession in 1907-08 led to a dramatic reduction of 2,000 workers.

During the recession the company decided to move tube and pipe production to its main factory in Pennsylvania.  The local facility’s name was changed to Kewanee Works of National Tube Company in 1908 and the employment level remained around 2,000.

In 1917 the Tube Company sold its Kewanee plant to its leading competitor in the production of valves and fittings, the Walworth Company of Boston, Massachusetts.  Until its closing in 1978 Walworth would share with Kewanee Boiler the distinction of being one of the two major industries in Kewanee.

The museum’s collection of Walworth materials is just as extensive as the Boiler collection, and the same is true of Boss Manufacturing, longtime manufacturer of gloves and still a major distributor of gloves with its headquarters in Kewanee.  Although not as extensive, the museum contains materials and information relating to other Kewanee industries.

Come check out the Kewanee Boiler display and all the other displays on “everything Kewanee.”

BoilerPicForHistory

The photo above is thanks to a donation by the family of the late Brule Carleson, former Kewanee Boiler employee, is this photo of the Kewanee Boiler office building located during the 1890s on Main Street just south of the railroads tracks.  The assembled employees were members of the Star of Hope Lodge 195 of the Brotherhood of Boilermakers.  The union was formed in 1898 and is possibly shown preparing for a Labor Day parade.

Thanks
Pete

On Dec 9, 2020, at 2:52 PM, Ralph W. Brown <rbrown51@...> wrote:

Hi Tom,

Any idea about what one of those puppies weighed and/or during what time period they were manufactured?

Thanks,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

-----------------------------------------

From: "Tom Madden via groups.io"
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday December 9 2020 1:23:47PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

A couple weeks ago this HO Type C Kewanee boiler showed up as something "You may also be interested in..." when I checked eBay. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/303673005802

For only $15 (plus tax) and free shipping, I went for one. It arrived yesterday. The attached photos show it compared to a smaller boiler previously offered by Resin Car Works. It's 3D printed and shows the same faint diagonal build lines as Corey Bonsall's D&RGW gondola models. The seller (and I have no connection to him/them at all) has many other industrial-type loads in several scales. Appears to be a pretty tough and durable material. The seller also has a Shapeways store but the models there are more expensive and built with Shapeways' sintered nylon process, which leaves a more granular surface.

The flat car is a WestRail model.

Tom Madden



Charles Peck
 

Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and 
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and 
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a 
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car. 
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron 
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat. 
Chuck Peck


On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 4:32 PM Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:
I do not know what they weighed but I do know that if you ask multiscaledigitial they may have the info for their's.  I recently bought a casting for a flat car load and they can tell the cubic inches of resin used to print the item.  Then take that number and for HO scale multiply it by 87 x 87 x 87 x the density of steel  (about .3 pounds per cubic inch IIRC) and you have a nice approximation for the prototype weight.  They posted the estimated weight on their site for the item I was needing.

Now this works only for items that were solid steel.  For something like a boiler made of sheet metal and tubes with lots of interior voids this would not work.

Allen Cain


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Chuck,
 
When asked about the weight of these boilers, I was trying to figure out whether a flat car could handle more than one in a load.  Based on your comments, it looks like two or three power boilers would not over load a 40 ton flatcar.  Does that seem reasonable to you?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Charles Peck
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load
 
Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car.
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat.
Chuck Peck


Charles Peck
 

Kewanee made many different sizes.  Look at the width of your model.  
Seven or eight foot wide, three would work in my opinion.  Nine or ten 
foot wide, I would go with two.  Some smaller sizes might sit crosswise, 
side by side the whole length of the car with just enough spacing for dunnage 
and tie downs.
Chuck Peck


On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 6:50 PM Ralph W. Brown <rbrown51@...> wrote:
Hi Chuck,
 
When asked about the weight of these boilers, I was trying to figure out whether a flat car could handle more than one in a load.  Based on your comments, it looks like two or three power boilers would not over load a 40 ton flatcar.  Does that seem reasonable to you?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Charles Peck
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load
 
Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car.
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat.
Chuck Peck


Tom Madden
 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Jeffrey White
 

I agree with Chuck. One of my additional duties in the Army made me the facility manager for an armory building that was a WPA project in 1936.  It was heated by a boiler that looked just like that model.  During my tenure there, they replaced the heating system.  They had to cut the boiler up into pieces to get it out because they had put it in place in the basement boiler/mechanical room and built the building over it.  I got to see some construction photos, a couple hundred men and wheelbarrows pushing concrete up ramps to pour into the forms. (the building was poured concrete).  Those guys on those WPA projects really worked.

Back to the boiler, I ended up disposing of the boiler and all of the radiators, total scrap was about 13000 pounds.  I figure a ton for the radiators and the rest was boiler, so I guess somewhere between 5 and 5 and a half tons.  At some point in it's life it had been converted from coal burning to gas burning so I don't know if the conversion changed the weight.

Jeff White

Alma, IL

On 12/9/2020 5:50 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Hi Chuck,
 
When asked about the weight of these boilers, I was trying to figure out whether a flat car could handle more than one in a load.  Based on your comments, it looks like two or three power boilers would not over load a 40 ton flatcar.  Does that seem reasonable to you?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Charles Peck
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load
 
Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car.
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat.
Chuck Peck


Allen Cain
 

On the multiscaledigital site there is a picture of three Birchfield boilers on a flatcar.  Two are large and one small.

I plan to model this with 2 HO and 1 N scale boilers.

Allen Cain


Steve SANDIFER
 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Steve, it doesn’t take a REALLY HUGE BUILDING to require multiples of these in series.  Good engineers set them up so as the weather gets colder, they are lit and heat in sequence, to avoid wasting fuel.  A public school of the vintage we’re likely to be modeling might well require three boilers.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Douglas Harding
 

I served a church that had an old one in the boiler room down in the basement. They couldn’t get it out when they replaced it with a new smaller modern boiler.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 9:58 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

Steve, it doesn’t take a REALLY HUGE BUILDING to require multiples of these in series.  Good engineers set them up so as the weather gets colder, they are lit and heat in sequence, to avoid wasting fuel.  A public school of the vintage we’re likely to be modeling might well require three boilers.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Charles Peck
 

Boilers are boilers, be it on a locomotive or in a building.  They require cleaning 
and upkeep.  Even if that hospital could handle cold weather with two boilers, 
they would have three. One offline getting serviced or ready to go when another 
was due for service.  Factory, City Hall, school or laundry,  they can't take a day off 
every so often to wash out mud and brush the flues.  Worse, what happens when the 
brickwork collapses and you are down for days?  
Those sort of important places had to have backup.  Your state capitol building almost 
certainly has multiple air conditioning compressors.  
The railroads in steam days would have protection engines ready at change points.  
Same idea, have coverage just in case.  
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 10:58 PM Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Steve, it doesn’t take a REALLY HUGE BUILDING to require multiples of these in series.  Good engineers set them up so as the weather gets colder, they are lit and heat in sequence, to avoid wasting fuel.  A public school of the vintage we’re likely to be modeling might well require three boilers.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Tim O'Connor
 


I just looked Tom - he's got another batch ready! :-)


On 12/9/2020 7:46 PM, Tom Madden via groups.io wrote:
The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tom Madden
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 06:29 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
I just looked Tom - he's got another batch ready! :-)
Looks like he made another batch of 20. Once you get the printing parameters locked in you can set the printer to running and walk away. I assume the seller is using a Form 2 or equivalent - and probably more than one. You can do multiples on a build platform so if you can do a couple runs a day (including overnight) it's pretty easy to replenish the stock. Considering the large number of items the seller is offering, and the thoroughness of the item descriptions, this is not some random hobbyist making a few for himself and his friends.

Didn't realize a seller can keep an eBay listing active after the item sells. Must be an eBay Store thing when you are selling multiples of identical items. Interesting.....

Tom Madden


Matt Smith
 

Here is link to a spec sheet for the Type C. Shipping weight shows a range of 3100 lbs to 26,100 lbs.

https://www.oemboilerparts.com/specs/7L70.pdf

Just pull out the scale rule and measure your model in question to get a ball park weight and how many you can fit on a rail car.

Here is a good photo of a smaller one.

http://idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll62/id/22841/rec/1

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Matt Smith
 

Another great link to Kewanee Boiler history. Lots of good photos, many loaded on rail cars.

https://kewanee-history.com/photo-galleries/gallery-4/
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL