Topics

Lehigh Valley 4-Bay Hopper

Scott Seders
 

Is the Hobbyline model the best starting point for this LV hopper?

I wanted to be certain there isn’t a better model (injection molded plastic or resin) available that I am overlooking.

Benjamin Hom
 

Scott Seders asked:
"Is the Hobbyline model the best starting point for this LV hopper?
I wanted to be certain there isn’t a better model (injection molded plastic or resin) available that I am overlooking."

Yes.  It's the ONLY starting point available in HO scale.  Make sure you don't get one of these models that was reboxed by Lionel HO - it's the same model, but will likely command a premium from the seller just because it's Lionel, even if it's a basket case.  These are easily identified by heat-stamped lettering.  Otherwise, you can still get these models at reasonable prices.


Ben Hom


Chuck Cover
 

Scott,

As Ben indicated the Hobbyline model is the best starting point. There was an article in Railroad Model Craftsman, May 2011, pp83-86, “Detailing a Lehigh Valley Hopper Car” and also an article on the Lehigh Valley #50100-50149 Series 70 Ton Covered Hopper in Anthracite Railroads Historical Society the Lehigh Valley Railroad Modeler section.

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM

Tim O'Connor
 


We have indeed discussed the Hobbyline model in the past - it even has cutouts
underneath to clear the wheels.

Because it is such a mediocre model, I wonder if a stand-in is not a better choice?

For example, could a Bowser H25 have the ribs sanded/filed off and then re-ribbed to
resemble the Lehigh Valley car?

Tim O'Connor




On 10/8/2019 9:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Scott Seders asked:
"Is the Hobbyline model the best starting point for this LV hopper?
I wanted to be certain there isn’t a better model (injection molded plastic or resin) available that I am overlooking."

Yes.  It's the ONLY starting point available in HO scale.  Make sure you don't get one of these models that was reboxed by Lionel HO - it's the same model, but will likely command a premium from the seller just because it's Lionel, even if it's a basket case.  These are easily identified by heat-stamped lettering.  Otherwise, you can still get these models at reasonable prices.


Ben Hom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

ford.donald77
 

Tim
The wheel base and the side height is different.  The hoppers are orientated all facing to the center were as the H21a is a saw tooth arrangement.  the hopper doors are a corrugated style I think call Apex.  The model has a poor three bumps facing in the wrong direction to simulate this.  The hopper doors are the hardest thing to model.  I tried but was not successful. I was working with the builders photo (ACF)
Chuck 
what did you sue for hopper doors on your models?
Don Ford
Cameron MO

On Tuesday, October 8, 2019, 10:59:28 AM CDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



We have indeed discussed the Hobbyline model in the past - it even has cutouts
underneath to clear the wheels.

Because it is such a mediocre model, I wonder if a stand-in is not a better choice?

For example, could a Bowser H25 have the ribs sanded/filed off and then re-ribbed to
resemble the Lehigh Valley car?

Tim O'Connor




On 10/8/2019 9:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Scott Seders asked:
"Is the Hobbyline model the best starting point for this LV hopper?
I wanted to be certain there isn’t a better model (injection molded plastic or resin) available that I am overlooking."

Yes.  It's the ONLY starting point available in HO scale.  Make sure you don't get one of these models that was reboxed by Lionel HO - it's the same model, but will likely command a premium from the seller just because it's Lionel, even if it's a basket case.  These are easily identified by heat-stamped lettering.  Otherwise, you can still get these models at reasonable prices.


Ben Hom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"We have indeed discussed the Hobbyline model in the past - it even has cutouts underneath to clear the wheels.

Because it is such a mediocre model, I wonder if a stand-in is not a better choice?

For example, could a Bowser H25 have the ribs sanded/filed off and then re-ribbed to resemble the Lehigh Valley car?"

The Bowser model is not Class H25, but Class H21A.  I don't have an LV ORER or diagram book handy at the office, but my gut feeling is the LV car is taller, and you'd have to rework the end details as well. 

You'd probably be better off taking the sanding block to the HObbytown model if you go that route.


Ben Hom

Scott Seders
 

Below is a diagram for the woodchip car conversion LV did. 

image1.jpeg


Scott Seders 
Salisbury, MD

On Oct 8, 2019, at 12:34 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"We have indeed discussed the Hobbyline model in the past - it even has cutouts underneath to clear the wheels.

Because it is such a mediocre model, I wonder if a stand-in is not a better choice?

For example, could a Bowser H25 have the ribs sanded/filed off and then re-ribbed to resemble the Lehigh Valley car?"

The Bowser model is not Class H25, but Class H21A.  I don't have an LV ORER or diagram book handy at the office, but my gut feeling is the LV car is taller, and you'd have to rework the end details as well. 

You'd probably be better off taking the sanding block to the HObbytown model if you go that route.


Ben Hom

Tim O'Connor
 


Don't forget the 70 ton trucks! There are now a couple of nice implementations
of plain bearing 70 ton trucks with 3 outboard springs - Kadee and Tangent, and
maybe others.




On 10/8/2019 1:48 PM, Scott Seders wrote:
Below is a diagram for the woodchip car conversion LV did. 



Scott Seders 
Salisbury, MD

On Oct 8, 2019, at 12:34 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"We have indeed discussed the Hobbyline model in the past - it even has cutouts underneath to clear the wheels.

Because it is such a mediocre model, I wonder if a stand-in is not a better choice?

For example, could a Bowser H25 have the ribs sanded/filed off and then re-ribbed to resemble the Lehigh Valley car?"

The Bowser model is not Class H25, but Class H21A.  I don't have an LV ORER or diagram book handy at the office, but my gut feeling is the LV car is taller, and you'd have to rework the end details as well. 

You'd probably be better off taking the sanding block to the HObbytown model if you go that route.


Ben Hom

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Benjamin Hom
 

Scott Seders wrote:
"Below is a diagram for the woodchip car conversion LV did. 

image1.jpeg


Scott, thanks.  Interpolating from the diagram, the height from rail to top chord of the pre-wood chip rebuilds is 10 ft 8 in.  PRR Class H21/H21A is 10 ft 6 in.

Two inches isn't necessarily a deal-breaker, but the wheelbase issues and different hopper orientation makes the Bowser conversion project a non-starter.


Ben Hom

Marty McGuirk
 

Anyone have a similar diagram for the conversion to two-bay hoppers that I understand started with these cars? 


Thanks, 


Marty McGuirk

Gainesville, VA



On October 8, 2019 at 1:48 PM Scott Seders <sseders@...> wrote:

 
Below is a diagram for the woodchip car conversion LV did. 

image1.jpeg


Scott Seders 
Salisbury, MD

On Oct 8, 2019, at 12:34 PM, Benjamin Hom < b.hom@...> wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"We have indeed discussed the Hobbyline model in the past - it even has cutouts underneath to clear the wheels.

Because it is such a mediocre model, I wonder if a stand-in is not a better choice?

For example, could a Bowser H25 have the ribs sanded/filed off and then re-ribbed to resemble the Lehigh Valley car?"

The Bowser model is not Class H25, but Class H21A.  I don't have an LV ORER or diagram book handy at the office, but my gut feeling is the LV car is taller, and you'd have to rework the end details as well. 

You'd probably be better off taking the sanding block to the HObbytown model if you go that route.


Ben Hom


 


 

Chuck Cover
 

RE:  what did you use for hopper doors on your models?

 

Don,

 

I used Bowser H21 Wine door locks and the hopper door angles were 3/64” styrene. These two details are the most visible from the sides of the model. I did little else with underbody details as the car is meant to be an operating model on my PRR’s Shamokin Branch Layout.  I did do the end brake detail and the grabs because they were so visible.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM

James E Kubanick
 

There was an article and drawings for these cars and the composite version in the August 1997, page 80, issue of RMC by Chuck Yungkurth. I also have a photo, from Bob's Photos of Reading 70056. It appears that both cars can be built from the Hobbyline model as I can detect only minor differences on the RDG car. I am attempting to build both now from Hobbyline cars that I obtained from a train show some years ago for $1 each.

I did build one of the LV versions some time ago and am satisfied with the results although I am now aware of some mistakes which I will correct on this build. So, I do agree with Ben that the Hobbyline car is the best starting point for the LV build and I can add that you also have an opportunity to use it to build another anthracite road car from it.

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV

On Tuesday, October 8, 2019, 4:05:01 PM EDT, Chuck Cover <chuck.cover@...> wrote:


RE:  what did you use for hopper doors on your models?

 

Don,

 

I used Bowser H21 Wine door locks and the hopper door angles were 3/64” styrene. These two details are the most visible from the sides of the model. I did little else with underbody details as the car is meant to be an operating model on my PRR’s Shamokin Branch Layout.  I did do the end brake detail and the grabs because they were so visible.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM

rwitt_2000
 

Marty,

This photo was captioned as a 2-bay rebuilt from the 4-bay.

Bob Witt