Topics

Lime Unloading IC/LTRR Gondola

Matt Smith
 

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Eric Hansmann
 

A Lake Terminal mill gondola pressed into bulk material service. Interesting. F&C produces an HO scale resin kit for this gondola. A few lettering styles are available, including this one. 

While bulk loads in a mill gon are not typical, they have occurred. I one found a photo of a 61-foot Western Maryland mill gon loaded with coal. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Sep 8, 2019, at 12:15 PM, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Paul Doggett
 

Very interesting photo.

Paul Doggett 


On 8 Sep 2019, at 18:15, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Charles Peck
 

I note that the year of the photo is 1943.  The wartime years of 1942 through 1945 saw a lot of exceptions to normal peacetime practices.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 1:15 PM Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:
Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Group!

In my observations it is not at all unusual for bulk agricultural lime to be shipped in mill gondolas, even those of 65' inside length.  Any free roaming car would be a candidate.

How to unload them is always an interesting solution to find.  Manual labor comes to mind.

Regards from sunny & dry Grove City in Western Penna.

Mike Schleigh

On Sunday, September 8, 2019, 1:22:00 PM EDT, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


A Lake Terminal mill gondola pressed into bulk material service. Interesting. F&C produces an HO scale resin kit for this gondola. A few lettering styles are available, including this one. 

While bulk loads in a mill gon are not typical, they have occurred. I one found a photo of a 61-foot Western Maryland mill gon loaded with coal. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Sep 8, 2019, at 12:15 PM, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Eric Hansmann
 

Here's the image of WM 50519 loaded with coal. This 61-foot mill gon was built in the late 1920s. The photo is dated 1936/08/05.

https://wvhistoryonview.org/catalog/001972



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN



On September 8, 2019 at 11:21 AM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

A Lake Terminal mill gondola pressed into bulk material service. Interesting. F&C produces an HO scale resin kit for this gondola. A few lettering styles are available, including this one. 

While bulk loads in a mill gon are not typical, they have occurred. I one found a photo of a 61-foot Western Maryland mill gon loaded with coal. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Sep 8, 2019, at 12:15 PM, Matt Smith < flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


 


 

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Eric,

In the late 19790s when I was at an inter-service school at Ft. Harrison, Indiana, I photographed a mill gondola of coal being unloaded for the base heating plant. Conrail had also provided a tracked crane with a clamshell bucket similar to the one in the Illinois photo, the whole rig mounted temporarily on a flatcar for the unloading. Sadly, I don't have the slide anymore.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 9/8/2019 1:21 PM, Eric Hansmann wrote:
A Lake Terminal mill gondola pressed into bulk material service. Interesting. F&C produces an HO scale resin kit for this gondola. A few lettering styles are available, including this one. 

While bulk loads in a mill gon are not typical, they have occurred. I one found a photo of a 61-foot Western Maryland mill gon loaded with coal. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Sep 8, 2019, at 12:15 PM, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I note that the load in the gon pretty closely resembles the plastic load that, I think, Athearn offers.  Same sort of undulating surface.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2019 1:22 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Lime Unloading IC/LTRR Gondola

 

A Lake Terminal mill gondola pressed into bulk material service. Interesting. F&C produces an HO scale resin kit for this gondola. A few lettering styles are available, including this one. 

 

While bulk loads in a mill gon are not typical, they have occurred. I one found a photo of a 61-foot Western Maryland mill gon loaded with coal. 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 8, 2019, at 12:15 PM, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Schleigh Mike
 

Schuyler and Group, Good Morning!

Agricultural lime is just like fine sand, easy to model with a number of mediums.

Mike Schleigh in Grove City, PA

On Monday, September 9, 2019, 11:34:53 PM EDT, Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:


I note that the load in the gon pretty closely resembles the plastic load that, I think, Athearn offers.  Same sort of undulating surface.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2019 1:22 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Lime Unloading IC/LTRR Gondola

 

A Lake Terminal mill gondola pressed into bulk material service. Interesting. F&C produces an HO scale resin kit for this gondola. A few lettering styles are available, including this one. 

 

While bulk loads in a mill gon are not typical, they have occurred. I one found a photo of a 61-foot Western Maryland mill gon loaded with coal. 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 8, 2019, at 12:15 PM, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:

Lime unloading from gondolas.

Another great images from the IDA Pantagraph Collection 
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/32654/rec/286

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Donald B. Valentine
 

Most easily by going to a limestone quarry and choosing the proper size from those that are offered.
I did that with an empty 2 lb. peanut butter jar and got a second one of smaller size for ballast. The
coarser one is to load the low side MEC gons, the prototype for the Ertl car that no one likes just
because its Ertl, that were loaded at the Swanton Lime Co. on the St.J. & L.C. for delivery to the
MEC in St. Johnsbury enroute to the Maine paper companies. Since I first mentioned this some two
years ago I'e not seen more than one Ertl MEC gon on eBay. So some of us know a good thing when
we see it even if most want to grouse about Ertl cars. All Ertl cars are so easy to improve details on
and with scale thickness, operating doors their USRA cars are the best buy for HO scale USRA double
sheathed cars we have ever had!

My two bits worth, Don Valentine

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Don,

Richard Hendrickson said the Ertl gondola was good for ACL as well, though it needs a straight center sill. Ertl did the car in ACL (I have one), but in freight car red instead of the correct black. I will repaint mine someday.

This spring at a train show in Virginia I came upon a large clutch of Ertl cars of all three types. I picked up two gondolas to reletter for my Virginia Midland. The boxcars I passed, since I already have two (1950s repaints and upgrades for GN and SP&S) and they were pretty by the late 1950s. I also have a couple of the flats stashed. Ertl cars are still out there, but getting hard to find.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 9/10/2019 8:06 PM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io wrote:
Most easily by going to a limestone quarry and choosing the proper size from those that are offered.
I did that with an empty 2 lb. peanut butter jar and got a second one of smaller size for ballast. The
coarser one is to load the low side MEC gons, the prototype for the Ertl car that no one likes just
because its Ertl, that were loaded at the Swanton Lime Co. on the St.J. & L.C. for delivery to the
MEC in St. Johnsbury enroute to the Maine paper companies. Since I first mentioned this some two
years ago I'e not seen more than one Ertl MEC gon on eBay. So some of us know a good thing when
we see it even if most want to grouse about Ertl cars. All Ertl cars are so easy to improve details on
and with scale thickness, operating doors their USRA cars are the best buy for HO scale USRA double
sheathed cars we have ever had!

My two bits worth, Don Valentine

Virus-free. www.avast.com

pennsylvania1954
 

Matt--Interesting photo. American ingenuity at work. These guys have done this before. The truck being loaded has a spreader mechanism on the back. Lime will fall through a gate onto the mechanism and be flung out to the sides. It seems that the spreader is driven by its own small gas engine. Simple process--no need for an expensive power take off. When loaded, no doubt it will be driven to a field, and its contents immediately spread.

The other "truck" is interesting also. Obviously repurposed from a former career, creature comforts have been completely discarded. Note the seat box. I wonder if they have somehow rigged a power take off driving a winch or if the truck is repositioned in order to raise and lower their shovel.

They will be busy for awhile. That is a lot of lime.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Sep 11, 2019 at 08:42 AM, pennsylvania1954 wrote:
The other "truck" is interesting also. Obviously repurposed from a former career, creature comforts have been completely discarded. Note the seat box. I wonder if they have somehow rigged a power take off driving a winch or if the truck is repositioned in order to raise and lower their shovel.
I noticed that too. I don't think it's a truck anymore, but rather a portable power unit. Note it has a drawbar style hitch attached to the front. Given the way it's positioned, at right angles to the lift line, I think the rear drive axles have been pulled, and they are just letting the line roll up around the drive shaft, although there may be a winding drum that we can't see on the far side of the operator, driven off the drive shaft. The operator just shifts between first and reverse to raise and lower the scoop.

Dennis Storzek