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Looking for car colors and road numbers (Tichy Flatcars)

radiodial868
 

The Airhose bracket on the SSW is rubber Hi-Techs and the DL&W is plastic Kadee with those crappy flimsy hoses replaced with black wire. 
As for the deck, that is a strong point of the Tichys. Attached is a set of images of the paint sequence.
  1. Gray solvent based primer (ModelMaster in this case).
  2. Swipes of thinned acrylic paint colors of the usual suspects: burnt & raw umbers & siennas, black, gray
  3. A thinned acrylic paint oxide or boxcar red wash
  4. Followed by a black artists oils wash
  5. Followed by good old Dullcoat.
Apologize for the bandwidth on STMFC, but never have shared this on Resin Freight Cars, because these ain't resin!
RJ Dial

mopacfirst
 

Thanks for posting this;  it replaces the Tichy kit advice that uses Floquil.  I had good results with the Floquil, and I've been kind of messing around with acrylics and gotten OK results, but I'm going to try these on several flatcars I currently have on the bench. 

Ron Merrick

Fred Jansz
 

That's a very realistic looking deck RJ!
Thanks for sharing your work.
Very inspiring.
Will try that too when the WP flats arrive....
Fred Jansz

radiodial868
 

So you don't think I'm like my grandmother, sweet lady, but she would always leave out some part of a recipe she was asked to share. 
  • I forgot to mention that one needs to really gouge up the surface first using a #17 Xacto chisel blade. Drag it, stab it, gouge it, split it & so on.
  • Another item is that these images used Floquil Foundation as the base color instead of gray primer. Only dif is that it varies the overall look across a fleet of cars. The key is to use a solvent based base coat followed by acrylic colors.
  • As the one image shows, I used artists paints in the squeeze tubes onto a glass plate, wetting the brush and then getting a little color on the brush.
  • Another trick, is that for decks that were originally painted (i.e. SP), I'll also add some of the body color to the palette. Similarly, I'll leave a board unpainted now and then to represent replacements. They still get the washes though.
  • I've also done this with wood decks like Model Masterpieces with the same results.
RJ Dial
Burlingame, CA

Tony Thompson
 

RJ Dial wrote:

  • Another trick, is that for decks that were originally painted (i.e. SP), I'll also add some of the body color to the palette. Similarly, I'll leave a board unpainted now and then to represent replacements. They still get the washes though.
    If by SP you mean Southern Pacific, I can assure you that SP did not paint flat car decks, ever, at least prior to 1960. They did use treated wood, but not paint.

Tony Thompson



radiodial868
 

Huh? Gotta love it. What's a poor modeler to do.  Step 23 of the Owl Mountain SP F-50 flatcar instructions says "Paint Specs called for SP Flatcars to have decks painted flatcar red".   The instructions references some book by a guy named Anthony W. Thompson called "Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3" for photos.    Jason, you got some 'splaining to do!   :>(p
RJ Dial
===============================

  • Another trick, is that for decks that were originally painted (i.e. SP), I'll also add some of the body color to the palette. Similarly, I'll leave a board unpainted now and then to represent replacements. They still get the washes though.
    If by SP you mean Southern Pacific, I can assure you that SP did not paint flat car decks, ever, at least prior to 1960. They did use treated wood, but not paint.
Tony Thompson

Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  I don't remember ever seeing any flat car deck (from any RR) that
wasn't "weathered wood" (grey+brown tones) in color ... both in
real life and in photos.
  Although it is certainly possible that some RRs painted the decks
when new/delivered ... I would be surprised to learn that they ever
re-painted and would expect the deck to loose all traces of paint
very quickly.  But what do I know?
  My process for 'coloring' flat car decks involves a base coat of
grey that is then dry brushed with a fine brush and a variety of
different color streaks applied in random - the majority of those
streaks are different shades of grey with a very few any shade
of brown.  These 'colors' are often thinned out to a wash for
this one, then thicker for the next, etc.
  The final step, as is my usual practice for all weathering,
is to airbrush a Very light 'dusting coat' of some weathering color
or other (grey/charcoal/tuscan/what ever).  This last step "blends"
the overall car colors and makes it hard to see the brush strokes or
washes as separate colors.
                                                                                                 - Jim

Tony Thompson
 

RJ Dial wrote:

Step 23 of the Owl Mountain SP F-50 flatcar instructions says "Paint Specs called for SP Flatcars to have decks painted flatcar red".   The instructions references some book by a guy named Anthony W. Thompson called "Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3" for photos.    

       I have no idea where Jason Hill got this idea. There is no such "paint spec" in my book, nor does any photo I have ever seen of an SP flat car suggest a painted deck. I suspect Jason's citation of my book is for overall information, not that specific paint detail. At least I hope so.

Tony Thompson