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Maximum Capacity Gondolas

Bob Chaparro
 

Maximum Capacity Gondolas

The text below is from the book, Car Shop Practice:

A Practical Textbook For The Instruction Of Mechanics, Helpers, And Apprentices In Railway Car Departments, Including Car Building And Repair Shops, Etc., /Prepared Under The Supervision And With The Approval Of An Editorial Advisory Board Of Railway Mechanical Officials.

This book was published by the Railway Training Institute in 1926.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

The 120-Ton Coal Car.—The largest freight car in commercial use at present is the 120-ton steel coal car. This is a type of gondola of which a large number were put into service on the Virginian Railway in 1921, after three years of exceptional test of four sample cars of this type and capacity had satisfied the managers of the road that such cars were both practicable and economical for their regular service. The most novel feature of this car is its size. It is 49 ft. 6 in. long by 10 ft. 23/4 in. wide inside, and has a depth at the center of 8 ft. 51/8 in. and at the ends over trucks of 7 ft. 41/4 in. The capacity is 3,840 cubic feet level full, or 4,450 cubic feet with a 30-degree heap. This latter figure, with coal at 54 lbs. per cubic foot, is equivalent to a capacity of 240,000 lbs., or 120 tons, which is the load the car is designed to carry. It has the general appearance of a modern quadruple hopper car, but has no hoppers, drop floors, or means of discharge other than the top; and is operated solely on the lines of the Virginian Railway, and dumped only in car dumping machines.

Maximum Capacity Gondola, P. R. R.—A steel gondola of slightly greater capacity even than the Virginian 120-ton car was exhibited in 1919 at the Atlantic City convention of the Master Car Builders’ Association, now merged in the Mechanical Division, American Railway Association. This was one of two cars then just completed for the Pennsylvania Railroad from designs prepared prior to the advent of the United States Railway Administration and approved by it for construction. The body of this car was fabricated from plates and pressed steel shapes after approved modern practice, while the trucks represented several new and novel features in design. The inside length of the car is 48 feet 6 in., height of side above rail 11 ft. 6 in., weight of car 74,600 lbs., load capacity 242,000 lbs., or 121 tons.

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
The PRR gon that is the topic of the second paragraph is the lone PRR class G23 car - see link below:
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 8:17 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Maximum Capacity Gondolas

Maximum Capacity Gondolas

The text below is from the book, Car Shop Practice:

A Practical Textbook For The Instruction Of Mechanics, Helpers, And Apprentices In Railway Car Departments, Including Car Building And Repair Shops, Etc., /Prepared Under The Supervision And With The Approval Of An Editorial Advisory Board Of Railway Mechanical Officials.

This book was published by the Railway Training Institute in 1926.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

The 120-Ton Coal Car.—The largest freight car in commercial use at present is the 120-ton steel coal car. This is a type of gondola of which a large number were put into service on the Virginian Railway in 1921, after three years of exceptional test of four sample cars of this type and capacity had satisfied the managers of the road that such cars were both practicable and economical for their regular service. The most novel feature of this car is its size. It is 49 ft. 6 in. long by 10 ft. 23/4 in. wide inside, and has a depth at the center of 8 ft. 51/8 in. and at the ends over trucks of 7 ft. 41/4 in. The capacity is 3,840 cubic feet level full, or 4,450 cubic feet with a 30-degree heap. This latter figure, with coal at 54 lbs. per cubic foot, is equivalent to a capacity of 240,000 lbs., or 120 tons, which is the load the car is designed to carry. It has the general appearance of a modern quadruple hopper car, but has no hoppers, drop floors, or means of discharge other than the top; and is operated solely on the lines of the Virginian Railway, and dumped only in car dumping machines.

Maximum Capacity Gondola, P. R. R.—A steel gondola of slightly greater capacity even than the Virginian 120-ton car was exhibited in 1919 at the Atlantic City convention of the Master Car Builders’ Association, now merged in the Mechanical Division, American Railway Association. This was one of two cars then just completed for the Pennsylvania Railroad from designs prepared prior to the advent of the United States Railway Administration and approved by it for construction. The body of this car was fabricated from plates and pressed steel shapes after approved modern practice, while the trucks represented several new and novel features in design. The inside length of the car is 48 feet 6 in., height of side above rail 11 ft. 6 in., weight of car 74,600 lbs., load capacity 242,000 lbs., or 121 tons.