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New Release: Tangent Scale Models GATC 8,000 Gallon Insulated 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car


Tangent Scale Models
 

New release for Small Business Saturday: our next production of General American 8,000 Gallon Insulated 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Cars. 

 

By the end of World War I, U.S. production of oil and oil-related products was sharply increasing thanks to the combination of war-related demands as well as demands from home.  In order to move oil and “new” consumer products, tank car producers introduced new car designs.  In 1917 General American Tank Car introduced a new general service 8,000 gallon non-insulated tank car, and quickly followed that production with an insulated 8,000 gallon tank car, which utilized a “jacket” that surrounded the tank and dome.  Built in East Chicago, IN, these insulated cars were easily identifiable by their circumferential rivets that surrounded the tank body, with notably different heights between the courses, and with their “recessed ends”.  These “radial course” tank cars utilized steel bolster plates that rise up vertically to hold the tank in place, complete with a “web” section behind to minimize steel consumption.  At a time of fairly monochromatic box cars plying the rails, these insulated tank cars carried consumable products, and they were typically stenciled for lessees advertising consumer products such as gasoline, wine, and corn products.  The GATC 1917-design family were the most prolific tank cars built during this period and were found everywhere from 1917 to roughly 1970. 

 

The Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-Design 8,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car is a highly-detailed tank car model that includes details accurate for each paint scheme, including KC- or AB-brake variations, with or without Cardwell draft sill springs, and different hand brakes.  Other visually-distinctive details for our models include the “see through” bolster section, circumferential rivets, and differing course heights.  Our RTR models include correct “true-to-life” colors and “hyper-accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement.  Finally, our scale replicas operate as well as they look, equipped with free-rolling all-metal wheels and Kadee® scale couplers, meaning our models are truly ready to run.  

           

For steam and transition-era modelers, these replicas will certainly be eye-catchers on your layout!  Check out the radial courses – they look like nothing else in HO!  Our new ready to operate replicas are in stock and available for sale at www.tangentscalemodels.com.  That’s right, no preorders! 

 

Our November 2020 release includes the following two paint schemes, plus two undecorated model options:

 

- NTCX "1922+ Lease" is our offering for “pre-depression” and “pre-diesel” modelers out there who have been requesting “plain” tank cars!  We have listened.  NTCX are the reporting marks for National Tank Car Company, who operated a fleet of 8,000 and 10,000 gallon tank cars.  Their insulated tank car fleet represented more than 30% of their total tank car fleet, which was large percentage-wise.  This model is offered in the “plain leaser” NTCX scheme from 1922 and was stenciled from an actual photo (see our website).  These NTCX cars were nationwide roamers and were likely used for viscous oil products.  Our National Tank Car Company 1922+ cars come with era-correct K-brakes and are available in three road numbers.  Because each real tank car was formed by hand and had individual gallon notations stenciled on each end of the car, all three of our models have the correct gallons stenciled on each end.  Yup, we did the research, so you don’t have to!

 

- ANPX "Anchor Petroleum Company, Tulsa OKLA. 1948+" is available for US modelers that are looking to bolster their fleet of “refined product” tank cars.  These insulated tank cars were likely used to haul refined oil products such as gasoline.  This car is stenciled like the prototype photo on our website, representing the car as it appeared in 1948.  We offer these neat tank cars in gray paint and black stenciling on the tank body.  The cars are offered with six road numbers, and because each real tank car was formed by hand and had individual gallon notations stenciled on each end of the car, all six of our models have the correct gallons stenciled on each end.  

 

- Undecorated RTR Black cars are ready for decaling!  This production includes RTR cars with the AB brake system.  Our last production included cars with the K-brake system.

 

- Undecorated Unpainted Kits are available as well.  When folks claim that “no one” makes kits anymore, well, here they are.  These are ready for building or kitbashing, and painting / decaling.  Great for those who desire to build their own.  This run of kits come with parts for either an AB- or a K-brake configuration.  Instructions for our kits are located on our website under “Other Stuff.”

 

Features for these awesome replicas include:

- Circumferential riveted tank body and riveted underframe (count ‘em, there are many!)

- Radial course tank body – note the “stairstep” appearance!

- All-new underframe for the GATC 1917-design

- “See-through” cast knee above the bolsters

- Accurate dome appliances

- Dimensionally-correct hazardous placards with accurate hole detail

- Separately applied tank handrail

- Separately applied tank strap detail

- KC- or AB- brake variations depending on the prototype car

- Inclusion of Cardwell draft sill springs depending on the prototype car, otherwise “oval” frame openings where the springs were removed

- Different hand brake appliance options depending on the prototype car

- Highly correct “true to life” colors

- “Hyper-Accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement, including lettering applied to the underframe and air reservoir

- Durable wire grab irons and coupler lift bars

- Separate air hoses

- “Near-scale” draft gear box with side detail

- Kadee® “scale-head” couplers

- CNC-machined 33” wheels in high-quality Tangent Scale Models ASF cast steel truck with spring plank and with separate brake beams

- Replacement semi-scale wheels available separately from Tangent

- Multiple road numbers for each scheme - these cars often traveled in "groups" of more than one

- Recommended age 14 years and older

 

Don’t miss out on the Tangent Scale Models General American 8,000 gallon 1917-design radial course tank car!  Just like its prototype, this car will stand out on any layout situated from 1917 to 1970, and they went everywhere!

 

Pricing for RTR models is $44.95.  High-resolution images showing these fine replicas are available at www.tangentscalemodels.com and our site also includes prototype images for your reference as well.

 

That wraps up our update for today, and thank you for supporting the family-owned businesses in our industry! 

 

David Lehlbach

Tangent Scale Models


Aley, Jeff A
 

These look really nice – as we’ve come to expect from Tangent.

 

My one question – why would gasoline require an insulated car?  Is the idea to prevent the vapor pressure from building up in the summertime?  One obviously (?) doesn’t need to ship gasoline in an insulated car in the winter.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tangent Scale Models via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, November 28, 2020 7:20 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] New Release: Tangent Scale Models GATC 8,000 Gallon Insulated 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car

 

New release for Small Business Saturday: our next production of General American 8,000 Gallon Insulated 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Cars. 

 

By the end of World War I, U.S. production of oil and oil-related products was sharply increasing thanks to the combination of war-related demands as well as demands from home.  In order to move oil and “new” consumer products, tank car producers introduced new car designs.  In 1917 General American Tank Car introduced a new general service 8,000 gallon non-insulated tank car, and quickly followed that production with an insulated 8,000 gallon tank car, which utilized a “jacket” that surrounded the tank and dome.  Built in East Chicago, IN, these insulated cars were easily identifiable by their circumferential rivets that surrounded the tank body, with notably different heights between the courses, and with their “recessed ends”.  These “radial course” tank cars utilized steel bolster plates that rise up vertically to hold the tank in place, complete with a “web” section behind to minimize steel consumption.  At a time of fairly monochromatic box cars plying the rails, these insulated tank cars carried consumable products, and they were typically stenciled for lessees advertising consumer products such as gasoline, wine, and corn products.  The GATC 1917-design family were the most prolific tank cars built during this period and were found everywhere from 1917 to roughly 1970. 

 

The Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-Design 8,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car is a highly-detailed tank car model that includes details accurate for each paint scheme, including KC- or AB-brake variations, with or without Cardwell draft sill springs, and different hand brakes.  Other visually-distinctive details for our models include the “see through” bolster section, circumferential rivets, and differing course heights.  Our RTR models include correct “true-to-life” colors and “hyper-accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement.  Finally, our scale replicas operate as well as they look, equipped with free-rolling all-metal wheels and Kadee® scale couplers, meaning our models are truly ready to run.  

           

For steam and transition-era modelers, these replicas will certainly be eye-catchers on your layout!  Check out the radial courses – they look like nothing else in HO!  Our new ready to operate replicas are in stock and available for sale at www.tangentscalemodels.com.  That’s right, no preorders! 

 

Our November 2020 release includes the following two paint schemes, plus two undecorated model options:

 

- NTCX "1922+ Lease" is our offering for “pre-depression” and “pre-diesel” modelers out there who have been requesting “plain” tank cars!  We have listened.  NTCX are the reporting marks for National Tank Car Company, who operated a fleet of 8,000 and 10,000 gallon tank cars.  Their insulated tank car fleet represented more than 30% of their total tank car fleet, which was large percentage-wise.  This model is offered in the “plain leaser” NTCX scheme from 1922 and was stenciled from an actual photo (see our website).  These NTCX cars were nationwide roamers and were likely used for viscous oil products.  Our National Tank Car Company 1922+ cars come with era-correct K-brakes and are available in three road numbers.  Because each real tank car was formed by hand and had individual gallon notations stenciled on each end of the car, all three of our models have the correct gallons stenciled on each end.  Yup, we did the research, so you don’t have to!

 

- ANPX "Anchor Petroleum Company, Tulsa OKLA. 1948+" is available for US modelers that are looking to bolster their fleet of “refined product” tank cars.  These insulated tank cars were likely used to haul refined oil products such as gasoline.  This car is stenciled like the prototype photo on our website, representing the car as it appeared in 1948.  We offer these neat tank cars in gray paint and black stenciling on the tank body.  The cars are offered with six road numbers, and because each real tank car was formed by hand and had individual gallon notations stenciled on each end of the car, all six of our models have the correct gallons stenciled on each end. 

 

- Undecorated RTR Black cars are ready for decaling!  This production includes RTR cars with the AB brake system.  Our last production included cars with the K-brake system.

 

- Undecorated Unpainted Kits are available as well.  When folks claim that “no one” makes kits anymore, well, here they are.  These are ready for building or kitbashing, and painting / decaling.  Great for those who desire to build their own.  This run of kits come with parts for either an AB- or a K-brake configuration.  Instructions for our kits are located on our website under “Other Stuff.”

 

Features for these awesome replicas include:

- Circumferential riveted tank body and riveted underframe (count ‘em, there are many!)

- Radial course tank body – note the “stairstep” appearance!

- All-new underframe for the GATC 1917-design

- “See-through” cast knee above the bolsters

- Accurate dome appliances

- Dimensionally-correct hazardous placards with accurate hole detail

- Separately applied tank handrail

- Separately applied tank strap detail

- KC- or AB- brake variations depending on the prototype car

- Inclusion of Cardwell draft sill springs depending on the prototype car, otherwise “oval” frame openings where the springs were removed

- Different hand brake appliance options depending on the prototype car

- Highly correct “true to life” colors

- “Hyper-Accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement, including lettering applied to the underframe and air reservoir

- Durable wire grab irons and coupler lift bars

- Separate air hoses

- “Near-scale” draft gear box with side detail

- Kadee® “scale-head” couplers

- CNC-machined 33” wheels in high-quality Tangent Scale Models ASF cast steel truck with spring plank and with separate brake beams

- Replacement semi-scale wheels available separately from Tangent

- Multiple road numbers for each scheme - these cars often traveled in "groups" of more than one

- Recommended age 14 years and older

 

Don’t miss out on the Tangent Scale Models General American 8,000 gallon 1917-design radial course tank car!  Just like its prototype, this car will stand out on any layout situated from 1917 to 1970, and they went everywhere!

 

Pricing for RTR models is $44.95.  High-resolution images showing these fine replicas are available at www.tangentscalemodels.com and our site also includes prototype images for your reference as well.

 

That wraps up our update for today, and thank you for supporting the family-owned businesses in our industry! 

 

David Lehlbach

Tangent Scale Models


Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff

I think at that time they produced "NATURAL GASOLINE" - this was the highly volatile stuff that came
straight out of the ground. I'm guessing that insulated cars may have had less chance of volatiles leaking out?
Would such a car would be an ICC 104, instead of an insulated ICC 103?




On 11/28/2020 1:00 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:

These look really nice – as we’ve come to expect from Tangent.

 

My one question – why would gasoline require an insulated car?  Is the idea to prevent the vapor pressure from building up in the summertime?  One obviously (?) doesn’t need to ship gasoline in an insulated car in the winter.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Steve and Barb Hile
 

You are both somewhat correct.  When refined gasoline was shipped in regular tank cars, especially in the summer months, there was a significant pressure build up possible that, in the event of a leak, could result in a big explosion.  Several of these disasters occurred in the 19 teens resulting in the creation of Class IV (later 104) for highly volatile cargos with a significant risk of danger if not handled properly.  This includes both refined and natural gasoline products.

 

Natural gasoline or liquefied petroleum gas became a significant market dominated by the Warren company as an octane booster in refined gasoline.  (A bit more on that next Saturday in the Hindsight – shameless plug.)

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, November 28, 2020 12:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New Release: Tangent Scale Models GATC 8,000 Gallon Insulated 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car

 

Jeff

I think at that time they produced "NATURAL GASOLINE" - this was the highly volatile stuff that came
straight out of the ground. I'm guessing that insulated cars may have had less chance of volatiles leaking out?
Would such a car would be an ICC 104, instead of an insulated ICC 103?




On 11/28/2020 1:00 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:

These look really nice – as we’ve come to expect from Tangent.

 

My one question – why would gasoline require an insulated car?  Is the idea to prevent the vapor pressure from building up in the summertime?  One obviously (?) doesn’t need to ship gasoline in an insulated car in the winter.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Andy Carlson
 

Natural gasoline and natural gas (Methane, Propane & Butane aka LPG) are not the same. LPG is liquid only when under high pressure. Natural gasoline, which mention started earlier in this thread, also called casing gas, well head gas, is a liquid at room temp and a by-product of pumping of oil well extraction. The Signal Hill oil field in Long Beach, CA seemed to have a lot of this liquid gas and a smart thinking individual saw the potential to make a good living. I don't suppose that the tank car movements of well head gasoline (natural gasoline) really amounted to that much volume to be of consequence. Non refined gasoline in my mind was not a big source of RR traffic. I love corrections when I am wrong....

The Signal Oil company quick success required more of the limited natural gasoline than which was available and had to go to refined gasoline products to feed its network of service stations.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Inline image


On Saturday, November 28, 2020, 3:13:25 PM PST, Steve and Barb Hile <shile@...> wrote:



Natural gasoline or liquefied petroleum gas became a significant market dominated by the Warren company as an octane booster in refined gasoline.  (A bit more on that next Saturday in the Hindsight – shameless plug.)

 

Steve Hile

 




Dave Parker
 

I sort of agree with Steve here, and sort of don't.  Focusing on the ICC regs (and ARA car classes) that bracket the presumptive build date (1922) of these NTCX TMI cars, I would offer the following:

1.  Not all TMI cars were Class IV (ICC 104) cars; there were insulated Class III/ICC 103 cars as well.  I have not discerned any way to tell them apart unless the photo is sharp enough to be able to read the ARA/ICC car class in the stencil to the right of center on the car side.

2.  Regardless of car class, a great many insulated cars also had steam heater coils, suggesting that at least their primary purpose was hauling viscous commodities rather than highly volatile inflammables.

3.  Also regardless of class, TMI cars were not that numerous, at least in the 1920s.  In my 1930 ORER, TMI cars comprise <3% of the UTLX fleet, and about 5% of the Sinclair fleet.

4. In the 1920 ARA tank cars specs, the only example commodity mentioned in connection with the Class IV cars is casinghead gasoline.  Note that Class 5 cars were also coming on-line at this time for specific (and dangerous) cargoes such as liquid chlorine and sulfur dioxide.  Later on, ethyl chloride starts to appears as a commodity mentioned in the context of Class IV cars.

5.  By 1923, the ICC had very detailed specifications for calculating the needed "outage" for volatile inflammables, including methanol, ethanol, acetone, and gasoline/naptha (the last broken down by density using the API scale).  These could all be carried in Class III/ICC 103 cars as long as sufficient headspace was provided to allow for expansion. That outage volume depended on the loading temperature and the coefficient of expansion of the particular commodity.

6.  That expansion volume might be provided by the dome alone but, if inadequate, the shell had to be filled less than level full.  Each car design had an outage table that showed how much additional head space was gained for each inch below level-full.

7.  For convenience, many owners started buying cars with domes greater than the 2.0% required for all Class III cars and, in my experience, domes right at 2% are more the exception than the rule.  Cars built in 1920s routinely had dome volumes of 2.3 to 3.0%, and 3.5+% cars are easy to find.

Bottom line:  the use of Class IV cars, while certainly permissible, wasn't necessary for routine hauling of refined gasoline, regardless of season (ANAICT).  It might have been more common with particularly "light" blends or components because of their greater volatility, but that's a guess.  

PS:  The primary difference between the Class III and IV cars that jumps out at me is the required pressure test for the tank:  60 psi for Class III versus 75 for Class IV.  The safety valves were to be set at the same 25 +/- 3 psi.

That's my take with my 1920s perspective -- other viewpoints and information are of course welcome.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Steve and Barb Hile
 

The two major disasters I was thinking about both involved casinghead gasoline.  One was in September 1915 in Ardmore, Oklahoma where more than 40 were killed and much of the downtown was destroyed.  The other was in Memphis in April 1921.  The results led to ways to empty casinghead gasoline without allowing the fumes to escape.

 

Thanks, Dave, for expanding on these things.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, November 28, 2020 8:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New Release: Tangent Scale Models GATC 8,000 Gallon Insulated 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car

 

I sort of agree with Steve here, and sort of don't.  Focusing on the ICC regs (and ARA car classes) that bracket the presumptive build date (1922) of these NTCX TMI cars, I would offer the following:

1.  Not all TMI cars were Class IV (ICC 104) cars; there were insulated Class III/ICC 103 cars as well.  I have not discerned any way to tell them apart unless the photo is sharp enough to be able to read the ARA/ICC car class in the stencil to the right of center on the car side.

2.  Regardless of car class, a great many insulated cars also had steam heater coils, suggesting that at least their primary purpose was hauling viscous commodities rather than highly volatile inflammables.

3.  Also regardless of class, TMI cars were not that numerous, at least in the 1920s.  In my 1930 ORER, TMI cars comprise <3% of the UTLX fleet, and about 5% of the Sinclair fleet.

4. In the 1920 ARA tank cars specs, the only example commodity mentioned in connection with the Class IV cars is casinghead gasoline.  Note that Class 5 cars were also coming on-line at this time for specific (and dangerous) cargoes such as liquid chlorine and sulfur dioxide.  Later on, ethyl chloride starts to appears as a commodity mentioned in the context of Class IV cars.

5.  By 1923, the ICC had very detailed specifications for calculating the needed "outage" for volatile inflammables, including methanol, ethanol, acetone, and gasoline/naptha (the last broken down by density using the API scale).  These could all be carried in Class III/ICC 103 cars as long as sufficient headspace was provided to allow for expansion. That outage volume depended on the loading temperature and the coefficient of expansion of the particular commodity.

6.  That expansion volume might be provided by the dome alone but, if inadequate, the shell had to be filled less than level full.  Each car design had an outage table that showed how much additional head space was gained for each inch below level-full.

7.  For convenience, many owners started buying cars with domes greater than the 2.0% required for all Class III cars and, in my experience, domes right at 2% are more the exception than the rule.  Cars built in 1920s routinely had dome volumes of 2.3 to 3.0%, and 3.5+% cars are easy to find.

Bottom line:  the use of Class IV cars, while certainly permissible, wasn't necessary for routine hauling of refined gasoline, regardless of season (ANAICT).  It might have been more common with particularly "light" blends or components because of their greater volatility, but that's a guess.  

PS:  The primary difference between the Class III and IV cars that jumps out at me is the required pressure test for the tank:  60 psi for Class III versus 75 for Class IV.  The safety valves were to be set at the same 25 +/- 3 psi.

That's my take with my 1920s perspective -- other viewpoints and information are of course welcome.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA