Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,


"500 lb. demolition bombs in railroad car. Note chucking and number of tiers of bombs. 216 bombs to the car. Official photograph U.S. Army Signal Corps, Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation, Newport News, Virginia"


Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars in 1944


https://catalog.archives.gov/id/138926206


Enjoy!


Claus Schlund


Louis Van Winkle
 

That would be a good car for a "Do Not Hump" sign.


On Tue, Sep 27, 2022 at 5:04 PM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
Hi List Members,


"500 lb. demolition bombs in railroad car. Note chucking and number of
tiers of bombs. 216 bombs to the car. Official photograph U.S. Army
Signal Corps, Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation, Newport News, Virginia"


Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars in 1944


https://catalog.archives.gov/id/138926206


Enjoy!


Claus Schlund








Bruce Smith
 

From the lettering on the inside, perhaps NKP?

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2022 4:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Hi List Members,


"500 lb. demolition bombs in railroad car. Note chucking and number of
tiers of bombs. 216 bombs to the car. Official photograph U.S. Army
Signal Corps, Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation, Newport News, Virginia"


Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars in 1944


https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcatalog.archives.gov%2Fid%2F138926206&amp;data=05%7C01%7Csmithbf%40auburn.edu%7Ce10f578524854657535608daa0cbe7c8%7Cccb6deedbd294b388979d72780f62d3b%7C1%7C0%7C637999094868802869%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=jYCMvS3VMzZWuYvi95%2BuQ2QyolkggpONsxXhrmVZE2I%3D&amp;reserved=0


Enjoy!


Claus Schlund








Scott
 

Being in Virgina would those be naval shells?  Looks like they have collars on them to help move them around I am guessing?

Neat picture.

Scott McDonald 


Dave Nelson
 

Look at the ease at which that man is holding that shell.  My bet is it is an empty casing and it is being shipped to some location where more exciting material will be added.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Louis Van Winkle
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2022 3:27 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars

 

That would be a good car for a "Do Not Hump" sign.

 

On Tue, Sep 27, 2022 at 5:04 PM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,


"500 lb. demolition bombs in railroad car. Note chucking and number of
tiers of bombs. 216 bombs to the car. Official photograph U.S. Army
Signal Corps, Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation, Newport News, Virginia"


Nice view of dunnage used to load bombs into boxcars in 1944


https://catalog.archives.gov/id/138926206



Philip Dove
 

I think if you look at the way the Guy is balanced the bomb or casing is more or less wedged where it is. Otherwise l think he would fall backwards, though of course the photo only catches a moment in time and perhaps the guy fell flat on his back moments later. 
I am certain the bomb is a bomb 1) because of its shape.  2)bombs tend to be described by weight, naval shells by calibre. 3) The location does not support the idea of it being a naval munition as all the fighting was away from the USA so almost all munitions needs shipping anyway. The hoops around the casing were to do with handling and removed before final use. The bombs are not fused and probably also lack tail fins. Did the US export empty casings for the British to fill when they got to the UK? In the first world war the British had shell filling factories, presumably filling cases cast, and manufactured elsewhere. 


Benjamin Hom
 

Scott McDonald wrote:
"Being in Virginia would those be naval shells?  Looks like they have collars on them to help move them around I am guessing?"

Philip Dove replied:
"I am certain the bomb is a bomb
 
  1) because of its shape.
  2) bombs tend to be described by weight, naval shells by caliber.
  3) The location does not support the idea of it being a naval munition as all the fighting was away from the USA so almost all munitions needs shipping anyway.

The hoops around the casing were to do with handling and removed before final use. The bombs are not fused and probably also lack tail fins."

Agreed.  These also lack the rotating band found on projectiles that engages the rifling of the gun.


Ben Hom



Wallace Steinbrecher
 

Not a naval round or an artillery projectile.  Does not have the bourrelets to engage the rifling in the tube.  They look like standard 500 lb. general purpose (GP) bombs.

Normally stored and shipped unfused and without a tail package.  If they are GP bombs, they would have yellow striping to indicate they contain a high explosive payload.

Wallace Steinbrecher 


On Wednesday, September 28, 2022, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:
Scott McDonald wrote:
"Being in Virginia would those be naval shells?  Looks like they have collars on them to help move them around I am guessing?"

Philip Dove replied:
"I am certain the bomb is a bomb
 
  1) because of its shape.
  2) bombs tend to be described by weight, naval shells by caliber.
  3) The location does not support the idea of it being a naval munition as all the fighting was away from the USA so almost all munitions needs shipping anyway.

The hoops around the casing were to do with handling and removed before final use. The bombs are not fused and probably also lack tail fins."

Agreed.  These also lack the rotating band found on projectiles that engages the rifling of the gun.


Ben Hom



C J Wyatt
 

I wonder. The photo is dated 1/6/44.

In a Southern Railway Asheville Division Conductor's Train Book, I have a consist of a train with 25 boxcars of bombs departing Asheville NC and arriving Spencer NC at 5:05 am on 1/4/1944. The consist has one NKP boxcar, NKP 16828. I wonder if the door is consistent with that series. That is the only spotting feature I see to work with.

Jack Wyatt


C J Wyatt
 

I should have mentioned that the destination of the boxcars of bombs was Newport News.

Jack Wyatt


Bob Chaparro
 

This photo may go with the original photo post:

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/76508160
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


C J Wyatt
 

On Thu, Sep 29, 2022 at 11:05 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
This photo may go with the original photo post:

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/76508160
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Thanks,Bob. I was wondering if other pictures were taken, but I was unsucessful in finding one. Your picture is showing bomb loading at the Cornhusker Ordinance Plant in Grand Island, Nebraska. For those interested in WWII traffic, here is a bit of history for the plant:

Cornhusker Ordnance Plant (Grand Island, Neb.) [RG0825.AM] | History Nebraska

Jack Wyatt