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[Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Seamless Pipe Fitting Load On GN Flat Car 60031 (1956) now NYC depressed well flat


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

Forgive the late date of photo, but I do not have one in NYC days.

 

What does anyone know of this car in its early days?

 

Was it an NYC product?

 

I find the engineering fascinating.  The sandwiched plate sides are really cool.

 

TIA,

 

Elden

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Seamless Pipe Fitting Load On GN Flat Car 60031 (1956)

 

You bet, Don.

 

Manufacturers of tall loads did design things to fit the clearance diagram, but were constantly pushing the RRs to provide them deeper cars.

 

The most extreme of the “suspended load” concept, IMO, was the so-called “Schnabel” cars, which were designed to suspend big turbines between their two halves, the load being bolted to the car’s bearing surfaces.  Thus, doing away with the need for sides or floor.  Wild concept.

 

In your neck of the woods, the B&M serving the big GE plant on-line had a line of really cool well flats, from which the load was suspended on girders with feet atop the end decks.  Very cool.

 

I have an F&C kit built of that B&M car.  I love it.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 7:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Seamless Pipe Fitting Load On GN Flat Car 60031 (1956)

 

    Now I think you’re getting close to the mark Ron. I was wondering if anyone considered the fact that some loads for which a well hole car is needed are shaped in such ways that structural wood or steel bars or beams can be passed through them so they are actually supported but the deck while part of them hangs down through the hole created by the well. Has anyone considered this?

 

Cordially, Don Valentine