NYC reblt gon


Clark Propst
 

I've assembled painted a CHS NYC gon rebuilt from a USRA car, or so the instructions say. It also states these cars were numbered 349000-349999 in two batches. Then it says these cars were renumbered in 1937 to 658000-658499, 659500-659749,661750-661999. There are no photos of one of these cars. The decals have both the initials and numbers between lines and without lines. 

My question is when did the NYC do away with the stripes above and below the initials/numbers? I'd like to do the car for 1950 +- 5 yrs.

Replies are much appreciated,
Clark Propst

Happy Pickett's Charge day


ROGER HINMAN
 

Still scratching my head a bit on this one;  349000-349999 were built in three lots 379-G; 389-G and 403-G.  I have-not been able to located anything on the 658000-611999 series;   there were a group of the USRA gons rebuilt in 1937 to steel cars including two of the build lots above, they were assigned NYC Lot 660-G and there are photos of these on the NYCHS Archives




Looking at some later builders’ photos on the same site, it looks like they were still using stripes in the early fifties

Roger Hinman

On Jul 3, 2021, at 2:34 PM, Clark Propst via groups.io <cepropst@...> wrote:

I've assembled painted a CHS NYC gon rebuilt from a USRA car, or so the instructions say. It also states these cars were numbered 349000-349999 in two batches. Then it says these cars were renumbered in 1937 to 658000-658499, 659500-659749,661750-661999. There are no photos of one of these cars. The decals have both the initials and numbers between lines and without lines. 

My question is when did the NYC do away with the stripes above and below the initials/numbers? I'd like to do the car for 1950 +- 5 yrs.

Replies are much appreciated,
Clark Propst

Happy Pickett's Charge day


Seth Lakin
 

On Sat, Jul 3, 2021 at 01:34 PM, Clark Propst wrote:
My question is when did the NYC do away with the stripes above and below the initials/numbers? I'd like to do the car for 1950 +- 5 yrs.

The 1” white stripes (or black for gray cars) on top of and below of the reporting marks started about 1933 and went to about 1959. For about a year into 1960, a single line was applied between the NYC and the numbers. Then the line was removed entirely. 

For a 1950 +/-5 model, lines on top and bottom of the stacked reporting marks. 


Seth Lakin
Michigan City, IN
NYCSHS Modelers Committee Chairman


nyc3001 .
 

Does anyone know where I could get double-sided Murphy ends for this car? I have a few of the flat kits but want to detail the interiors.

-Phil Lee


Clark Propst
 

Thanks so much for the replies!! Very helpful. One last question: The instructions give a Floquil mix for a freight car red. I know the NYC switched colors on their hoppers. Don't want to show off a photo of this car when finished and get emails saying it should be black at that time. 1948-52

Happy 4th! Enjoy your cook out,
Clark Propst


nyc3001 .
 

It would most likely have been red at the time. Some NYC hoppers, gondolas, and flatcars were black before 1941, but they were repainted to oxide red after that date.

-Phil


nyc3001 .
 
Edited

To add, most of the "USRA" gondolas that the Central owned were actually built as all-steel clones from 1925 to 1929. The actual wood-sheathed USRA gons (that were later rebuilt into the F&C kit's prototype) numbered 2000 (iirc) while the steel clones numbered 8499. All except the last few orders (which had Dreadnaught ends) had Murphy ends and differed in some small ways from the actual USRA gons which had seams on the bottoms and ends of the car sides after they were rebuilt as steel cars.

But from ~1948, the steel clones were rebuilt with new sides that had a slight fishbelly and new IDN ends. So, in 1948-1952, you could actually see at least four common variants of "USRA" gons (if I'm not mistaken, there were taller USRA clones and cars rebuilt as very short auto-frame cars too).

I'm also trying to determine is the rate at which the clones were rebuilt into fishbelly-side cars so I can represent a mix of these gons accurately in my own 1951 Central collection.

-Phil