Topics

OIL CAR


mel perry
 

can anyone identify what an oil car was?
and why a separate classification?
thanks
mel perry


On Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 11:09 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: UP Livestock Car 60156 (1895)

Photo from the Sioux City Public Museum:

https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/?siouxcityjournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f8/af8ad4b3-f4cc-5521-9314-a0c07d569482/536574c6681e5.image.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Charles Peck
 

The X in front of the number would seem to indicate a company service car.
As such, it likely carried kerosene for lanterns, engine lubricants of various 
sorts, journal oil, and other such supplies in drums or cases of  grease.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 3:06 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
can anyone identify what an oil car was?
and why a separate classification?
thanks
mel perry

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 11:09 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: UP Livestock Car 60156 (1895)

Photo from the Sioux City Public Museum:

https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/?siouxcityjournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f8/af8ad4b3-f4cc-5521-9314-a0c07d569482/536574c6681e5.image.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Lloyd Keyser
 

Also old crankcase oil to be returned to the refinery for reprocessing. Lloyd Keyser

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 2:40 PM Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:
The X in front of the number would seem to indicate a company service car.
As such, it likely carried kerosene for lanterns, engine lubricants of various 
sorts, journal oil, and other such supplies in drums or cases of  grease.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 3:06 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
can anyone identify what an oil car was?
and why a separate classification?
thanks
mel perry

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 11:09 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: UP Livestock Car 60156 (1895)

Photo from the Sioux City Public Museum:

https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/?siouxcityjournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f8/af8ad4b3-f4cc-5521-9314-a0c07d569482/536574c6681e5.image.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Matthew Metoyer
 

This image is pre-1930; note the location of car numbers and railroad name. I doubt crankcase oil (or recycling) was a concern at that time.

Matthew Metoyer
Santa Maria CA

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 3:27 PM Lloyd Keyser <lloydkeyser@...> wrote:
Also old crankcase oil to be returned to the refinery for reprocessing. Lloyd Keyser

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 2:40 PM Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:
The X in front of the number would seem to indicate a company service car.
As such, it likely carried kerosene for lanterns, engine lubricants of various 
sorts, journal oil, and other such supplies in drums or cases of  grease.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 3:06 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
can anyone identify what an oil car was?
and why a separate classification?
thanks
mel perry

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 11:09 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: UP Livestock Car 60156 (1895)

Photo from the Sioux City Public Museum:

https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/?siouxcityjournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f8/af8ad4b3-f4cc-5521-9314-a0c07d569482/536574c6681e5.image.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


mel perry
 

matthew:
that was my thought also, just wondered
why they specifically labelled as they did
;-)
mel perry

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 3:37 PM Matthew Metoyer <mmetoyer@...> wrote:
This image is pre-1930; note the location of car numbers and railroad name. I doubt crankcase oil (or recycling) was a concern at that time.

Matthew Metoyer
Santa Maria CA

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 3:27 PM Lloyd Keyser <lloydkeyser@...> wrote:
Also old crankcase oil to be returned to the refinery for reprocessing. Lloyd Keyser

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 2:40 PM Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:
The X in front of the number would seem to indicate a company service car.
As such, it likely carried kerosene for lanterns, engine lubricants of various 
sorts, journal oil, and other such supplies in drums or cases of  grease.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 3:06 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
can anyone identify what an oil car was?
and why a separate classification?
thanks
mel perry

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 11:09 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: UP Livestock Car 60156 (1895)

Photo from the Sioux City Public Museum:

https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/?siouxcityjournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f8/af8ad4b3-f4cc-5521-9314-a0c07d569482/536574c6681e5.image.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Moderator


Eric Hansmann
 

I would guess the photo was taken in the 1900-1910 decade based upon lettering details. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Oct 25, 2020, at 5:47 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

matthew:
that was my thought also, just wondered
why they specifically labelled as they did
;-)
mel perry

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 3:37 PM Matthew Metoyer <mmetoyer@...> wrote:
This image is pre-1930; note the location of car numbers and railroad name. I doubt crankcase oil (or recycling) was a concern at that time.

Matthew Metoyer
Santa Maria CA_._,_._,_


Charles Peck
 

I can see two reasons for the car being so marked.  Both suppositions, as 
I did not work on that railroad in that time frame.
One, like cars in green hide service, I would think the interior to be grungy 
with leaks and spills. Not a condition one would want to spread through 
other cars in more general service.
Secondly, many of these products would be flammable to some extent. Kerosene 
for instance.  Good to warn people as to the contents.  Especially should it be 
having a roaring hotbox.
Chuck Peck  (Some days I wish for a time machine to get better answers.)

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 7:00 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:
I would guess the photo was taken in the 1900-1910 decade based upon lettering details. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Oct 25, 2020, at 5:47 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

matthew:
that was my thought also, just wondered
why they specifically labelled as they did
;-)
mel perry

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 3:37 PM Matthew Metoyer <mmetoyer@...> wrote:
This image is pre-1930; note the location of car numbers and railroad name. I doubt crankcase oil (or recycling) was a concern at that time.

Matthew Metoyer
Santa Maria CA


CJ Riley
 


A quick Google search led me to a site that stated oil recycling began in the 30s and grew substantially during WWII. Oil doesn’t wear out. It gets dirty and loses some of its components. Used oil can be filtered and additives replaced.



Mont Switzer
 

Used oil also makes pretty good fuel for some applications and was transported for such.  Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of CJ Riley via groups.io [cjriley42@...]
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR


A quick Google search led me to a site that stated oil recycling began in the 30s and grew substantially during WWII. Oil doesn’t wear out. It gets dirty and loses some of its components. Used oil can be filtered and additives replaced.



David
 

FYI, Union Pacific was reclaiming the distillate fuel from the lube oil in their McKeen cars during the late 1920s, and renewing the lube oil.

David Thompson


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

When I was much younger, many filling stations, especially locally-owned stations, sold reclaimed oil in bulk for automobile use. My father used to keep a couple of five-gallon cans of the stuff to pour into his Packards. Selling reclaimed oil pretty much disappeared with the homogenization of retail gas stations in the 1960s (which also ended distribution by local wholesalers who received petroleum products in freight cars--mandatory FC content). Of course, old oil is still recycled, but is rarely sold at retail, and most gas stations are now convenience stores that make more money selling snack food. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 4:11 PM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:

Used oil also makes pretty good fuel for some applications and was transported for such.  Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of CJ Riley via groups.io [cjriley42=yahoo.com@groups.io]
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR


A quick Google search led me to a site that stated oil recycling began in the 30s and grew substantially during WWII. Oil doesn’t wear out. It gets dirty and loses some of its components. Used oil can be filtered and additives replaced.



Richard Townsend
 

Used motor oil also used to be spread on dirt roads for dust control. That was a great way to get lead and other toxins into the environment. That's why the practice was ended.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Oct 26, 2020 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR

Friends,

When I was much younger, many filling stations, especially locally-owned stations, sold reclaimed oil in bulk for automobile use. My father used to keep a couple of five-gallon cans of the stuff to pour into his Packards. Selling reclaimed oil pretty much disappeared with the homogenization of retail gas stations in the 1960s (which also ended distribution by local wholesalers who received petroleum products in freight cars--mandatory FC content). Of course, old oil is still recycled, but is rarely sold at retail, and most gas stations are now convenience stores that make more money selling snack food. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 4:11 PM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:
Used oil also makes pretty good fuel for some applications and was transported for such.  Mont Switzer

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of CJ Riley via groups.io [cjriley42=yahoo.com@groups.io]
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR


A quick Google search led me to a site that stated oil recycling began in the 30s and grew substantially during WWII. Oil doesn’t wear out. It gets dirty and loses some of its components. Used oil can be filtered and additives replaced.



erieblt2
 

Many must know this, but I’ll mention it here. The Navy cleans, tests, and recycles all lubricating oil. The old diesel subs(ie Bonefish, Blueback, Barbel-the ‘B’ sisters) even recycled the oil from the Fairbanks-Morse propulsion diesels. But it’s not economical commercially- except in huge amounts. I use to use ‘Wolfs Head’ Recycled oil in my old Ford Falcon! Fill up the gas and add a quart or two of oil! Bill S.


On Oct 26, 2020, at 4:08 PM, Richard Townsend via groups.io <richtownsend@...> wrote:


Used motor oil also used to be spread on dirt roads for dust control. That was a great way to get lead and other toxins into the environment. That's why the practice was ended.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Oct 26, 2020 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR

Friends,

When I was much younger, many filling stations, especially locally-owned stations, sold reclaimed oil in bulk for automobile use. My father used to keep a couple of five-gallon cans of the stuff to pour into his Packards. Selling reclaimed oil pretty much disappeared with the homogenization of retail gas stations in the 1960s (which also ended distribution by local wholesalers who received petroleum products in freight cars--mandatory FC content). Of course, old oil is still recycled, but is rarely sold at retail, and most gas stations are now convenience stores that make more money selling snack food. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 4:11 PM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:
Used oil also makes pretty good fuel for some applications and was transported for such.  Mont Switzer

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of CJ Riley via groups.io [cjriley42=yahoo.com@groups.io]
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR


A quick Google search led me to a site that stated oil recycling began in the 30s and grew substantially during WWII. Oil doesn’t wear out. It gets dirty and loses some of its components. Used oil can be filtered and additives replaced.



Brent Greer
 

My father always kept a 5 gallon can of reclaimed motor oil to run through our chainsaws.  Part of what kept out house warm through the winter months in Virginia.

Brent

Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Richard Townsend via groups.io <richtownsend@...>
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 7:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR
 
Used motor oil also used to be spread on dirt roads for dust control. That was a great way to get lead and other toxins into the environment. That's why the practice was ended.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Oct 26, 2020 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR

Friends,

When I was much younger, many filling stations, especially locally-owned stations, sold reclaimed oil in bulk for automobile use. My father used to keep a couple of five-gallon cans of the stuff to pour into his Packards. Selling reclaimed oil pretty much disappeared with the homogenization of retail gas stations in the 1960s (which also ended distribution by local wholesalers who received petroleum products in freight cars--mandatory FC content). Of course, old oil is still recycled, but is rarely sold at retail, and most gas stations are now convenience stores that make more money selling snack food. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 4:11 PM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:
Used oil also makes pretty good fuel for some applications and was transported for such.  Mont Switzer

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of CJ Riley via groups.io [cjriley42=yahoo.com@groups.io]
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] OIL CAR


A quick Google search led me to a site that stated oil recycling began in the 30s and grew substantially during WWII. Oil doesn’t wear out. It gets dirty and loses some of its components. Used oil can be filtered and additives replaced.



Matthew Metoyer
 

It's nice to know oil was recycled in the 30's, but useless for the original question about the photo from the early 1900's. The oil cars belong to a Milwaukee Road predecessor, correct? Maybe someone from their historical society has other documents that can help?

Here is the link again: https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/siouxcityjournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/f8/af8ad4b3-f4cc-5521-9314-a0c07d569482/536574c6681e5.image.jpg

Matthew Metoyer
Santa Maria CA


Jim Ogden
 


earlyrail
 

On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 06:39 PM, Matthew Metoyer wrote:
It's nice to know oil was recycled in the 30's, but useless for the original question about the photo from the early 1900's. The oil cars belong to a Milwaukee Road predecessor, correct? Maybe someone from their historical society has other documents that can help?

Not the Milwaukee, but the Omaha Route,   (Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha) a part of the CNW system
Howard Garner


akerboomk
 

Was it early enough to be “pre-tank-car” ?

 

Initially (IIUC) oil (crude/refined) was shipped in barrels.  Obviously, leakage would contaminate the interior for other loadings (such as grain).

So…Dedicated “Oil Car”?

 

Other possibility is whale oil/kerosene/lamp oils for shipment to stations or shops (for RR use) or “retail” stores, which would sell to consumers?

 

Or would that all be gone by 1900?


--
Ken Akerboom


Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 01:18 PM, akerboomk wrote:
Was it early enough to be “pre-tank-car” ?
Why is everyone missing the fact that the two cars have "X" car numbers, which is a clear indication that they are in some sort of company service. Many RRs marked their work cars as to function, bunk car, tool car, this just follows the pattern. These cars may have sat at various terminals acting as storage sheds as well as transportation.

Dennis Storzek


mel perry
 

dennis:
just out of curiosity, this was the first
picture of such that i have seen in my
65 years of being in the hobby, and no
the "x" designation wasn't overlooked,
and yes there have been plausible
explanations posted, just curious as to
what the official description is and the
"why"
;-)
mel perry