Topics

Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931


Richard Townsend
 

I don’t know if they still do, but back in the 1970s on Navy ships they had 5 gallon buckets of blood that were used as a foamant in firefighting.


On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:48 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:



I can’t answer that question. My interests focused on what cars came in and out of a slaughter house, and what did they contain or what was their function, mostly so I could fill out waybills. Additional information makes for a  good story during the clinic.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 8:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

So I guess this leads to the next question: if you wash out all that lanolin, presumably the left over urine/lanolin also has industrial value?  

 

Does that go to a rendering plant?  Or fertilizer maker?  Or some other kind of chemical company?

 

Rob

 

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 5:53 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

 

You don’t think it’s washed several times in the process of making the sweater? Have you smelled pig urine when buying said sweaters? Likely not. 

Thanks!

Brian Ehni 

(Sent from my iPhone)



On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:39 PM, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:



Another good reason to wash/dry clean newly purchased wool clothing before wearing it.

 

Ken Montreo

On 08/03/2020 8:35 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

 

Oh you will regret. A prime use for hog urine was cleaning lanolin from raw wool. Think of that the next time you wear a wool sweater. It is also used in fertilizer.

 

Most blood was dried before shipping as blood is very corrosive to steel. Whole blood has to be shipped in glass lined tank cars. Blood was a rich source of protein used in animal feeds as well as in blood meal used as a fertilizer. Up to 30% is used in human consumption products, ie blood sausage, black pudding, baked goods, etc. Medicine and pharmaceuticals are another use.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 6:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

OK, much as wonder if I will regret it, I have to ask: what was the market for blood, and what was the market for hogs urine?  I have packing plants on the line I model, bt have no insight about this tank car traffic.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 4:31 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

Claus thank you. You are correct that is a Decker tank car, used for various fats, like lard, and for blood and hog urine. The tank cars were gone by the early 30s, replaced by leased units.


You cite two groups of Decker reefers, there were others.

 

 

 

 


Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the info you could provide Doug.  I’ve just spent a couple of enjoyable hours on-line looking for answers from the 20’s through 40’s, but I've found this will be a question that takes me to a library for publications I couldn’t find on line.  Not sure the libraries are open yet, but sometime soon I think.  

Rob

On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:48 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

I can’t answer that question. My interests focused on what cars came in and out of a slaughter house, and what did they contain or what was their function, mostly so I could fill out waybills. Additional information makes for a  good story during the clinic.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 8:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

So I guess this leads to the next question: if you wash out all that lanolin, presumably the left over urine/lanolin also has industrial value?  

 

Does that go to a rendering plant?  Or fertilizer maker?  Or some other kind of chemical company?

 

Rob

 

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 5:53 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

 

You don’t think it’s washed several times in the process of making the sweater? Have you smelled pig urine when buying said sweaters? Likely not. 

Thanks!

Brian Ehni 

(Sent from my iPhone)



On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:39 PM, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:



Another good reason to wash/dry clean newly purchased wool clothing before wearing it.

 

Ken Montreo

On 08/03/2020 8:35 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

 

Oh you will regret. A prime use for hog urine was cleaning lanolin from raw wool. Think of that the next time you wear a wool sweater. It is also used in fertilizer.

 

Most blood was dried before shipping as blood is very corrosive to steel. Whole blood has to be shipped in glass lined tank cars. Blood was a rich source of protein used in animal feeds as well as in blood meal used as a fertilizer. Up to 30% is used in human consumption products, ie blood sausage, black pudding, baked goods, etc. Medicine and pharmaceuticals are another use.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 6:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

OK, much as wonder if I will regret it, I have to ask: what was the market for blood, and what was the market for hogs urine?  I have packing plants on the line I model, bt have no insight about this tank car traffic.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 4:31 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

Claus thank you. You are correct that is a Decker tank car, used for various fats, like lard, and for blood and hog urine. The tank cars were gone by the early 30s, replaced by leased units.


You cite two groups of Decker reefers, there were others.

 

 

 

 




Douglas Harding
 

Rob, most of the major meat packers owned soap making companies, so byproducts were shipped to those plants. Or they were sold to third party concerns who had use for them. Nothing was wasted. National Provisioner magazine is a good place to start for anything related to the meat packing industry. You can find it in many AG School libraries, I know Iowa State has a full collection. Early issues of National Provisioner are on line via Google. USDA Bulletins and publications related to the meat industry are also good. And most government publications are also on line.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 11:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

Thanks for the info you could provide Doug.  I’ve just spent a couple of enjoyable hours on-line looking for answers from the 20’s through 40’s, but I've found this will be a question that takes me to a library for publications I couldn’t find on line.  Not sure the libraries are open yet, but sometime soon I think.  

 

Rob

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:48 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

I can’t answer that question. My interests focused on what cars came in and out of a slaughter house, and what did they contain or what was their function, mostly so I could fill out waybills. Additional information makes for a  good story during the clinic.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 8:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

So I guess this leads to the next question: if you wash out all that lanolin, presumably the left over urine/lanolin also has industrial value?  

 

Does that go to a rendering plant?  Or fertilizer maker?  Or some other kind of chemical company?

 

Rob

 

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 5:53 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

 

You don’t think it’s washed several times in the process of making the sweater? Have you smelled pig urine when buying said sweaters? Likely not. 

Thanks!

Brian Ehni 

(Sent from my iPhone)




On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:39 PM, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:



Another good reason to wash/dry clean newly purchased wool clothing before wearing it.

 

Ken Montreo

On 08/03/2020 8:35 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

 

Oh you will regret. A prime use for hog urine was cleaning lanolin from raw wool. Think of that the next time you wear a wool sweater. It is also used in fertilizer.

 

Most blood was dried before shipping as blood is very corrosive to steel. Whole blood has to be shipped in glass lined tank cars. Blood was a rich source of protein used in animal feeds as well as in blood meal used as a fertilizer. Up to 30% is used in human consumption products, ie blood sausage, black pudding, baked goods, etc. Medicine and pharmaceuticals are another use.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 6:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

OK, much as wonder if I will regret it, I have to ask: what was the market for blood, and what was the market for hogs urine?  I have packing plants on the line I model, bt have no insight about this tank car traffic.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 4:31 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

Claus thank you. You are correct that is a Decker tank car, used for various fats, like lard, and for blood and hog urine. The tank cars were gone by the early 30s, replaced by leased units.


You cite two groups of Decker reefers, there were others.

 

 

 

 

 

 


mikefrommontanan
 

I agree with Mr. Stozrek's assertion that this is a modified image.  Perhaps done to show somebody what a proposed scheme would look like on a full size car.  It appears that a knock out image (type) was over the print when exposed.

Quicker than paint!

Michael Seitz
Missoula MT


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G.J. Irwin
 

With respect to the Oscar Mayer car, if I recall correctly from my late father's accumulation of HO trains, the folks at Athearn did a car similar to the retouched photo Claus referenced.   It had red sides, black ends and roof, white lettering.  I don't recall if there were any reporting marks.

A "not a Steam Era Freight Car," perhaps?

--George Irwin


Richard Townsend
 

-----Original Message-----
From: G.J. Irwin <groups@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Aug 4, 2020 11:47 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

With respect to the Oscar Mayer car, if I recall correctly from my late father's accumulation of HO trains, the folks at Athearn did a car similar to the retouched photo Claus referenced.   It had red sides, black ends and roof, white lettering.  I don't recall if there were any reporting marks.

A "not a Steam Era Freight Car," perhaps?

--George Irwin