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Other stuff I came across

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

Thought I'd add a description of the material I was working with yesterday
at Stanford:

1) Carload Waybill Analysis, 1950 - State to state distribution of Products
of Forests.
2) Carload Waybill Analysis, 1950 - State to state distribution of Products
of Agriculture.
3) Carload Waybill Analysis, 1950 - State to state distribution of Products
of Manufacturers.
4) Carload Waybill Analysis, 1950 - State to state distribution of Products
of Animals.

I copied #1 and #4 fully, got most of #2, and sampled #3 (e.g., auto
industry commodities)

The contents of these 4 follow the same pattern: state-to-state movement,
carloads, tons, revenue, ton miles, car miles, and several averages from the
above. The order is by commodity class, then originating state. All data
is based on the 1% waybill sample, so many of the numbers are small.

Fer instance, Bannanas: I had always assumed they all came thru LA. (the
port of New Orleans). Not so. Both AL. (Mobile) and MD. (Baltimore) were
likely ports as well, and some small quantities into NJ. and CA. Most LA.
originated bannanas went to IL. (no surprise), but there were no indications
of movements out of IL. to other states suggesting there was no warehousing
of this fruit for later distribution (we Illini must love our bannanas).

I wanted Forwarder and LCL traffic, but these were the last 2 pages and have
been torn off and lost.


5) Carload Waybill Analysis, 1949 - Percentage distribution of tonnage by
milage block.

This one is a simple list of all 220+ commodities citing total tons measured
by the 1% sample and calculating what percentage of those travelled in each
of the 10 mileage blocks (e.g., 0-49 miles, 50-99, 100-199, etc.).

Samples: 68% of sugar beets travelled less than 50 miles. 60% of frozen
fruit travelled 2000-2999 miles. 41% of coal went 200-399 miles. 33% of
beer went 600-999 miles. etc.


6) Carload Waybill Analysis, 1950 - Quarterly seasonal comparisons from
1947, 48, 49, 50.

Again, all 220+ commodity classes having calendar quarter data for carloads,
tonnage, average mileage and revenue, for each of the 4 years cited.

Absent exact seasonality data from an individual railroad, this will form
the basis for any seasonality adjustments that could be applied to annual
commodity reports -- the data I posted for Jeff English on the Rutland.


7) Tons of revenue freight terminated...[by state], 1st Quarter 1950.

This is the total tonnage, not the 1% sample, of each commodity, as
originated and terminated by state.

So, in 1Q1950, 27585 tons of bannanas originated in Alabama, 0 tons
originated, 21072 tons terminated in Illinois. 64891 tons originated in
Loiusiana. 23041 tons originated in Maryland. Etc.

Unfortunately I ran out of coins before I could get the other 3 quarters of
data. Some other trip no doubt. And were I to obtain a couple of years of
data, the utility of item 6, above, might diminish being replaced by
seasonal data from this source.

and lastly:


8) Tons of Revenue Freight for each class 1 railroad... 1948.

As shown in the first sheet of the file I put out on egroups. I did the
Rutland and the Sac Northern. I had intended on filling out my 1950 data (I
have all the central west roads, plus one or two others), but the book had
gone walkabout so there I with time and money and no first target and all
that other neat stuff....

-----------------------------------
Dave Nelson

Ed Workman <eworkman@...>
 


Fer instance, Bannanas: some small quantities into NJ. and CA.
There were PFE cars dedicated to this service (That is, labelled "Banana
Service") between L.A. Harbor and Vernon, a tiny industrial city near the
southeast corner of central Los Angeles.

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Dave Nelson writes:

Samples: 68% of sugar beets travelled less than 50 miles. 60% of frozen
fruit travelled 2000-2999 miles. 41% of coal went 200-399 miles. 33% of
beer went 600-999 miles. etc.

Dave, I'm curious. Any notion of whether the coal mileage was higher or
lower for the other 59%? I'm also curious about bauxite. There are photos of
a bauxite train...loaded in box cars no less...going west over Sherman Hill
in the 50s. Wonder what its destination was and how often this happened?

Mike Brock

Ed Workman <eworkman@...>
 

I'm also curious about bauxite. There are photos of
a bauxite train...loaded in box cars no less...going west over Sherman Hill
in the 50s. Wonder what its destination was and how often this happened?

Mike Brock
Major aluminum plants were constructed on the Columbia River ( near The
Dalles for one) to support WWII aircraft production...lots of electricity
required

Richard Hendrickson
 

Mike Brock wrote:

....I'm also curious about bauxite. There are photos of
a bauxite train...loaded in box cars no less...going west over Sherman Hill
in the 50s. Wonder what its destination was and how often this happened?
Mike, in the 1950s some Bauxite was mined in the southeastern US, but the
most important source was Jamaica, with Jamaican Bauxite being transported
by ship to Gulf Coast ports. During WW II, when there was a tremendous
increase in demand for aluminum, primarily for use in aircraft
construction, several large plants were constructed in the Pacific
Northwest because ample hydroelectric power was available and the
production of aluminum requires a great deal of electricity. No doubt
bauxite trains bringing southeastern and Jamaican ore to the plants near
the Columbia River ran fairly frequently on the UP, which would have
provided the western part of the most direct route.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Ed and friends,

When I was stationed in Long Beach with the U.S. Coast Guard, I
occasionally ventured down to the harbor (rare, but then I sailed a desk
for eight years). Near the Metropolitan Terminal was a large banana
dock, probably one of the main entry points to the vast California
retail market. I doubt that it was as big as the ones in Florida or New
Orleans, but an awful lot of fruit used to go up those conveyor belts.
Unfortunately, by the late 1970s it all went into trucks.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Ed Workman wrote:



Fer instance, Bannanas: some small quantities into NJ. and CA.
There were PFE cars dedicated to this service (That is, labelled "Banana
Service") between L.A. Harbor and Vernon, a tiny industrial city near the
southeast corner of central Los Angeles.

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Major aluminum plants were constructed on the Columbia River ( near The
Dalles for one) to support WWII aircraft production...lots of electricity
required
I'm surprised bauxite/alumina would travel west over Sherman, since a lot of it
came into Portland OR and was loaded onto trains for the trip up the Columbia
and into Montana. Before the war there was a very large aluminum facility right
outside Portland too.

On the other hand, wasn't there some bauxite mining in Missouri, or somewhere
in the midwest? Can you tell from the photo whose box cars are loaded with the
bauxite? That might give some clue to its origins.

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Brock [mailto:brockm@...]
Dave, I'm curious. Any notion of whether the coal mileage was higher or
lower for the other 59%?

Well, yes. The report shows all 100%. I grabbed a sample. I suppose you
now want the rest too?

0-49: 8%
50-99: 10%
100-199: 16%
200-399: 41%
400-599: 21%
600-999: 3%

I'd gather that Sherman Hill is more than 999 miles from the Pochontas coal
belts... even in the dark.

I'm also curious about bauxite. There are photos of
a bauxite train...loaded in box cars no less...going west over
Sherman Hill in the 50s. Wonder what its destination was
and how often this happened?
Bauxite is included in commodity class 311: Aluminum ore. Per the 1%
waybill sample, a full 40% moved 2000-2999 miles by rail (26% in the 200-399
range and 21% in the 400-599 miles range).

Having said that, I turned to the Minerals Report of 1950 and found this
other data: Arkansas produced 98% of the national total of Bauxite
(1,552,047 tons), most of which got refined nearby into Alumina. This sum
was only 43% of the nations consumption. Alumina was refined at 4 plants:
Alcoa's mobile AL. was the largest. They refined imported alumina. Their
East St. Louis plant refined Alumina from Arkansas. The Kaiser plant was in
Baton Rouge, LA. and worked over South American Alumina. Lastly was the
Reynolds plant in Hurricane Creek, Arkansas, which had the largest capacity
but apparently was under utilized. The G.S.A. purchased large quantities
for the national strategic reserve, which in this case was in Arkansas.
Most. but not all, Alumina went into metalitic Aluminum; some went into
abrasives.

The chapter on Aluminum states there were 11 (mostly unnamed) reduction
plants, several of which were inactive (Massena NY., Baden NC., Listerhill
AL.). It also states new plants were being built in Wenatchee WA., Jones
Mills, Ark., Corpus Cristi TX., Chalmette LA., and Klaispell MT.

I do not have the state to state distribution of the Products of mines, but
from the quarterly commodity reports 1947-50 it's clear shipment volume
fluctuated wildly -- 2:1 or 3:1 fluctuations from quarter to quarter.
1Q1950 was in the middle to low end. In this quarter, the largest shipments
of commodity class 311 were from AL - 27.5k tons, Ark - 90k tons, IL - 38k
tons, LA. - 84.8k tons are the 4 largest states of origin and WA - 132.8k
tons was by far the largest state of destination. Again, Quarterly data.

Lastly, from the 1950 Commodity reports from class 1 railroads, the C&S
bridged 95k tons in 1950; the CBQ bridged 219k tons; MP originated 127k tons
(most of which terminated online), received & terminated 316k tons, and
bridged another 381k tons; the UP received & terminated 232k tons in the
same year. No traffic to speak of on the SP, DRGW, or WP. And as I stated
earlier, I was unable to find the damn book so I was unable to obtain the
annual data from the GN, NP, TNO, ATSF, CNW... as I had planned to do,
which, with what I have in hand, would have given me 95+% of the tonnage
moved west of the Missisippi.

At any rate, it appears to me that that photo you saw was indicative of an
ongoing, large volume movement of alumina, no doubt to Washington. The data
suggests the UP had half of the inbound (rail) tonnage to Washington. I
would guess the other half was a CB&Q-GN plus C&S-NP movement.

Dave Nelson

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor [mailto:timoconnor@...]
I'm surprised bauxite/alumina would travel west over Sherman,
since a lot of it came into Portland OR and was loaded onto
trains for the trip up the Columbia and into Montana.
Before the war there was a very large aluminum
facility right outside Portland too.
Must depend on the year. 1Q1950 there were no originating shipments of
Alumina in either Washington or Oregon.

Dave Nelson