Photo: Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad Gondola 545 (Circa 1936)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad Gondola 545 (Circa 1936)

A photo from the Maine Memory Network:

https://www.mainememory.net/artifact/50417

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge it.

Notice the “see through” wheels (my term). Sporty!

The Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad became part of the Maine Central.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Philip Dove
 

Very interesting, are the holes in the wheels circular or are they are triangle of curved lines almost as though the wheels have rusted away and exposed the swirl pattern on the back, which I am sure they haven't. What does anyone else think.

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Sun, 4 Apr 2021 at 18:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad Gondola 545 (Circa 1936)

A photo from the Maine Memory Network:

https://www.mainememory.net/artifact/50417

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge it.

Notice the “see through” wheels (my term). Sporty!

The Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad became part of the Maine Central.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


akerboomk
 

Holes look to me like “teardrop” shaped, probably sized/shaped to fit between the “ribs” on the back side.

Look at the left most wheels


--
Ken Akerboom


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Apr 4, 2021 at 03:18 PM, akerboomk wrote:

Holes look to me like “teardrop” shaped, probably sized/shaped to fit between the “ribs” on the back side.

Look at the left most wheels

Agreed. Bur whatever it is, it's street railway / interurban equipment. Note the cars have radial couplers. Street railways liked spoked wheels, or wheels with holes through the wheel plate. The theory was it disrupted the resonance of the plate, and cut down on the howl as the wheels went around tight streetcar radius curves.

 Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Apr 4, 2021 at 04:16 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
But whatever it is, it's street railway / interurban equipment.
The original name of the line was Lewiston Augusta & Waterville, which pretty much describes where it ran. It failed in 1919 and was renamed  Androsoggin & Kennebec. It was pruned back to just the city and suburban lines around Lewiston in 1937, and totally abandoned in 1941. The Electric Interurban Railways in America by Hilton and Due states that they did handle interchange freight cars short distances.


Philip Dove
 

Interesting i learn a lot from posts and replies like these. Thank you, Happy Easter