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Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

A circa 1920 Shorpy photo from the National Photo Company Collection:

https://www.shorpy.com/node/23403

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Matt Goodman
 

The radial lubrication streaking on the left most wheel face caught my eye. Probably from a leak through the rear seal while standing still.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On Jul 21, 2020, at 5:58 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar
A circa 1920 Shorpy photo from the National Photo Company Collection:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 05:09 PM, Matt Goodman wrote:
The radial lubrication streaking on the left most wheel face caught my eye. Probably from a leak through the rear seal while standing still.
 
Solid bearing journal boxes don't really have seals... the rear opening was closed by a "dust guard" which in the period of this photo would have been wood.. The oil level was maintained below the level of the axle. if the box was over filled, the excess quickly ran out the back. In operation, capillary action brought the oil up into the ball of wool yarn "waste" (short strands of yarn of no use for weaving) where it wetted the exposed bottom of the axle. When the axle turned the oil was drawn in between the axle journal and the journal bearing, and the car actually rode on a film of oil. This was a "total loss" lubrication system, as the oil spread across the journal it came out both the front and back edges of the bearing, which were shoulders that acted as thrust bearings to keep the truck aligned with the wheels. The oil that crept out the back was flung out and ended up on the face of the wheel, which is why there are no rusty wheels during the steam era.

Dennis Storzek


Eric Hansmann
 

A very interesting image. I see several stake pocket replacements have been installed. I’m surprised no one has noted the similarity of this NYC prototype to the Tichy HO scale model.

 

Roger Hinman gave a clinic on NYC steel flat cars at the 2018 RPM Chicagoland. Roger separated the flat cars into different types, based upon spotting features. His Type 2 cars had fish belly center sills and straight side sills. They were a 40-ft length, slightly shorter than the 41-ft Tichy flat car kit, and had 11 stake pockets compared to 12 on the Tichy model.

 

The NYC installed 2050 of these flat cars (Lot 208-F) from AC&F in 1906 and assigned to NYC&HR, CCC&StL, MC, and CI&S. All were delivered with early Andrews cast steel side frame trucks and 11 side stakes.

 

Just need to adjust the stake pocket spacing and create some decals for the Tichy model to stand-in for NYC Lines cars.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 4:59 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

 

Photo: Boiler On NYC Flatcar

A circa 1920 Shorpy photo from the National Photo Company Collection:

https://www.shorpy.com/node/23403

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Matt Goodman
 

Agreed on the “no rusty wheels”. I’ve been working on prototypically modeling/weathering wheel faces for solid bearing trucks recently. Every time I think I have an accurate and easily reproducible method, I find another well-lit photo illustrating some new oil pattern. In this case, it was the radial streaking - different than the more common “soft” circumferential wicking from the hub outward and tire inward. 

This wheel face is relatively clean - maybe there simply hasn’t been enough dirt/dust yet collected to absorb and distribute the oil more evenly. In any case, another well-lit reference. 



Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Jul 21, 2020, at 10:27 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 05:09 PM, Matt Goodman wrote:
The radial lubrication streaking on the left most wheel face caught my eye. Probably from a leak through the rear seal while standing still.
 
Solid bearing journal boxes don't really have seals... the rear opening was closed by a "dust guard" which in the period of this photo would have been wood.. The oil level was maintained below the level of the axle. if the box was over filled, the excess quickly ran out the back. In operation, capillary action brought the oil up into the ball of wool yarn "waste" (short strands of yarn of no use for weaving) where it wetted the exposed bottom of the axle. When the axle turned the oil was drawn in between the axle journal and the journal bearing, and the car actually rode on a film of oil. This was a "total loss" lubrication system, as the oil spread across the journal it came out both the front and back edges of the bearing, which were shoulders that acted as thrust bearings to keep the truck aligned with the wheels. The oil that crept out the back was flung out and ended up on the face of the wheel, which is why there are no rusty wheels during the steam era.

Dennis Storzek