Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:

https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5h73q970h

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.

Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.

Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


John Mateyko
 

8"(circumference) rope coils were possibly 100 fathoms each.  John Mateyko


Jeff
 

Am I missing them, or does that car not have airbrakes? That would
definitely put it in captive/non-interchange service.

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 9:11 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io
<chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:

https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5h73q970h

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.

Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.

Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Jeff Shultz
http://www.shultzinfosystems.com
A railfan approaches a grade crossing hoping that there will be a train.


Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

notice the near coupler is missing a knuckle. Definitely dock service only if 1917

Ted Schnepf

On Friday, March 26, 2021, 11:44:06 AM CDT, Jeff <jeffshultz@...> wrote:


Am I missing them, or does that car not have airbrakes? That would
definitely put it in captive/non-interchange service.

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 9:11 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io
<chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load
>
> A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:
>
> https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5h73q970h
>
> Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.
>
> Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.
>
> Perhaps in captive service at the port?
>
> Bob Chaparro
>
> Hemet, CA
>
>



--
Jeff Shultz
http://www.shultzinfosystems.com
A railfan approaches a grade crossing hoping that there will be a train.






Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Interesting photo. Odd that there is no road name or initials on this car. While this might be captive industrial car, I suspect that this photo has been airbrushed out like that those genericized pictures the Association of American Railroads relabeled "East & West" or some such gobbledy-gook.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 12:11 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:

https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5h73q970h

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.

Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.

Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Steven D Johnson
 

Look at the coupler...A makeshift "link and pin" arrangement. You can see the bar or rod going to the other car. Neat.

I would agree it's in captive service.

Steve Johnson

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeff
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 11:44 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

Am I missing them, or does that car not have airbrakes? That would
definitely put it in captive/non-interchange service.

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 9:11 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io
<chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:

https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5h73q970h

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.

Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.

Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Jeff Shultz
http://www.shultzinfosystems.com
A railfan approaches a grade crossing hoping that there will be a train.


vapeurchapelon
 

It even doesn't have coupler lift bars and brake hoses -> likely NO working brake at all!
It seems that it just has been shoved back and forth on only a few hundred feet at the most.

Many greetings

Johannes

Gesendet: Freitag, 26. März 2021 um 18:26 Uhr
Von: "Steven D Johnson" <tenncentralrwy@comcast.net>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

Look at the coupler...A makeshift "link and pin" arrangement. You can see the bar or rod going to the other car. Neat.

I would agree it's in captive service.

Steve Johnson


-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeff
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 11:44 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

Am I missing them, or does that car not have airbrakes? That would
definitely put it in captive/non-interchange service.

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 9:11 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io
<chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:

https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5h73q970h

Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.

Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.

Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Jeff Shultz
http://www.shultzinfosystems.com
A railfan approaches a grade crossing hoping that there will be a train.











Ralph W. Brown
 

Yes, John, except it would called “line,” and it’s probably manila line.  What sea-going folks call “rope” is actually steel cable.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: John Mateyko
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 12:30 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load
 
8"(circumference) rope coils were possibly 100 fathoms each.  John Mateyko


Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load
A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:
Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.
Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.
Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Seems likely. This cannot have moved any substantial distance with the rolls of rope just lying on the flat car.

Tony Thompson




akerboomk
 

Although I agree it is probably in captive use (due to all the other reasons mentioned), just because the load has not been secured is (to me) not the reason (or not sufficient reason).

The photographer *could* have caught the car in “we loaded the car but haven’t secured it for shipping yet” state.


--
Ken Akerboom


John Mateyko
 
Edited

Ralph,  With all due respect I am pretty sure when the item in questioned is ordered, it is referred to as rope.  Once on board, spliced per custom of the vessel and put to use it is then referred to as a specific line.  The same piece of 8" rope could be used once as a bow line, the next time as a spring line, another time as a breast line and another as a stern line.  When the captain orders. "Single up all lines" all lines which have been doubled up have one of those lines brought aboard.  When the captain orders, "Take in the stern breast line" every crew member in the docking/undocking party knows which specific line that is.  After leaving the dock/pier/wharf the chief mate will pass the order to stow all lines(they are still on deck in their most recently used area) into the Rope Locker, the lines are put into the rope locker.  The last one in may have been used as the stern line.  The next time, it would be the first piece out and more than likely will become either the forward line or the forward breast line.
By the way sir, how many years did you serve aboard a big ship's deck department?
Respectfully,
John Mateyko


Douglas Harding
 

Note the car is linked to a neighboring car with a drawbar, held in place with a pin in the coupler missing the knuckle.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi John,
 
Let me start be saying that I started sailing and operating power boats in high school, and subsequently spent sixteen years in the Navy and then the Coast Guard.  I was quite proficient in marlinspike seamanship, and still find uses for it.  I was also one of a small crew that rigged the USCGC Eagle in the Spring of ‘65 and again in ‘66. 
 
What we are seeing in this photo is a carload of “line,” probably 8” manila.  “Line” in common maritime parlance has multiple meanings.  “Lines” can refer to running rigging (sheets, clewlines, etc.), heaving lines, leadlines, lifelines, mooring lines, and others.  “Single up all lines” specifically refers to mooring lines, as you’ve noted.  Line, however, is also used collectively to refer to so many feet, yards, lengths, or coils of line, typically of a particular size.  “Rope,” in maritime parlance, generally refers to steel wire cable, and not to manila or other fiber line. 
 
Perhaps the nomenclature has become less strict in recent years, but it certainly wasn’t in my experience and it’s difficult for me to believe it was any less strict at the time that photo was taken.  We may just to agree to disagree on this.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: John Mateyko
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 5:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load
 

[Edited Message Follows]

Ralph,  With all due respect I am pretty sure when the item in questioned is ordered, it is referred to as rope.  Once on board, spliced per custom of the vessel and put to use it is then referred to as a specific line.  The same piece of 8" rope could be used once as a bow line, the next time as a spring line, another time as a breast line and another as a stern line.  When the captain orders. "Single up all lines" all lines which have been doubled up have one of those lines brought aboard.  When the captain orders, "Take in the stern breast line" every crew member in the docking/undocking party knows which specific line that is.  After leaving the dock/pier/wharf the chief mate will pass the order to stow all lines(they are still on deck in their most recently used area) into the Rope Locker, the lines are put into the rope locker.  The last one in may have been used as the stern line.  The next time, it would be the first piece out and more than likely will become either the forward line or the forward breast line.
By the way sir, how many years did you serve aboard a big ship's deck department?
Respectfully,
John Mateyko