Topics

Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)

A photo from the Museum of Ventura County

https://photographs.venturamuseum.org/items/show/2165

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Port Hueneme did a fairly good business before Los Angeles' port facilities were developed.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Donald B. Valentine
 

   Given that the nominal width of a flat car deck even at this early era was at least 9 ft. I’m going to suggest that anyone who thinks those are “grain sacks” on the flat car is badly mistaken. The sacks in the photo are a minimum of 4 ft. long being laid horizontally. That’s considerably longer than a normal 100 ib. grain sack, and

also thicker, was before the US Govt. began talking out of two sides of its mouth at once, on one hand promoting

better physical education programs because Americans were so out of shape while on the other hand seeking a

reduction of the standard grain bag weight to 50 lbs. to reduce back problems. Working with my son’s late uncle we used to get two boxcar loads of Blue Seal grain out of Richford, VT onto to the team track at Waterbury every other Tuesday for delivery over two afternoons. Out normal way of handling the bags was to take a 100 lb. bag on each shoulder from the boxcar to the truck and then from the truck to the farmer’s grain room. I also has sheep for nearly 20 years, purchasing and hauling the Blue Seal feed for them in 100 ln. bags. Thus I think I know what a 100 lb. bag of grain looks like and have never heard of grain being bagged in any heavier bags. I’m open to suggestions as to what is in the bags seen on the photos but am darn sure it is not grain.

 

Cordially, Don Valentime


Douglas Harding
 

Don that is not a normal size flatcar. The group of people to the right are standing next to a similar car. The deck is about at the lady’s knee, ie 18” high. Those rails may be 36” apart, making the deck about 5’ wide. So those may be grain sacks.

 

The other possibility is sacks of cotton. Think of those photos of people picking cotton by hand, dragging large gunny sacks behind them as they pick.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2020 8:25 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)

 

   Given that the nominal width of a flat car deck even at this early era was at least 9 ft. I’m going to suggest that anyone who thinks those are “grain sacks” on the flat car is badly mistaken. The sacks in the photo are a minimum of 4 ft. long being laid horizontally. That’s considerably longer than a normal 100 ib. grain sack, and

also thicker, was before the US Govt. began talking out of two sides of its mouth at once, on one hand promoting

better physical education programs because Americans were so out of shape while on the other hand seeking a

reduction of the standard grain bag weight to 50 lbs. to reduce back problems. Working with my son’s late uncle we used to get two boxcar loads of Blue Seal grain out of Richford, VT onto to the team track at Waterbury every other Tuesday for delivery over two afternoons. Out normal way of handling the bags was to take a 100 lb. bag on each shoulder from the boxcar to the truck and then from the truck to the farmer’s grain room. I also has sheep for nearly 20 years, purchasing and hauling the Blue Seal feed for them in 100 ln. bags. Thus I think I know what a 100 lb. bag of grain looks like and have never heard of grain being bagged in any heavier bags. I’m open to suggestions as to what is in the bags seen on the photos but am darn sure it is not grain.

 

Cordially, Don Valentime


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Aug 12, 2020 at 01:04 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Don that is not a normal size flatcar. The group of people to the right are standing next to a similar car. The deck is about at the lady’s knee, ie 18” high. Those rails may be 36” apart, making the deck about 5’ wide. So those may be grain sacks.

We forget, in this day and age, how common tramways were in the past. One shouldn't automatically assume that rails mean railroad. The motive power for this operation appears to be that team of mules, and from the looks of the deck they've been up and down it many, many times.

Cutest tramway I recall was in the print shop of the Chicago Transit Authority, used to print bus transfers and dating back to streetcar days. In the floor was a little 16" gauge tramway, still in use in the eighties to bring rolls of paper to the presses.

Dennis Storzek