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Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)

A photo from the Gateway To Oklahoma History website:

https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1593835/?q=loading

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

I'm guess the time period is early 1900s.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


HI Bob,
 
Thanks for the fascinating photo. I'm thinking, if I fill in some blanks in the photo, that the car closest to the camera possibly maybe is UTLX 629.
 
Note that NONE of the tank cars come equipped with any sort of dome platform nor any real place for employees to stand while working on loading/unloading the cars. To make up for this shortcoming, every car has a plank of wood to serve as a walkway and a work platform bridging from the car to the loading area.
 
I'm impressed that the loading area's elevated wooden walkway does NOT seem to be all soaked with oil!
 
It is clear that the tank car closest to the camera has the tank secured to the underframe by a cable that encirles the dome. The rest of the cars in the photo might have a more 'modern' tank anchorage.
 
What a glimpse into life over a century ago
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2020 1:17 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)

Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)

A photo from the Gateway To Oklahoma History website:

https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1593835/?q=loading

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

I'm guess the time period is early 1900s.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


earlyrail
 

<<possibly maybe is UTLX 629.
The UTLX reporting marks places it in the mid teens for later.
The requirement for the X did not appear until 1913

Howard Garner


Steve and Barb Hile
 

Agree, Thanks, Bob.  UTLX 629 has a Bettendorf steel underframe circa 1903.  According to the 1919 tank car tariff, it had a capacity of 12062 gallons with a dome capacity of 232 gallons.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 1:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)

 

HI Bob,

 

Thanks for the fascinating photo. I'm thinking, if I fill in some blanks in the photo, that the car closest to the camera possibly maybe is UTLX 629.

 

Note that NONE of the tank cars come equipped with any sort of dome platform nor any real place for employees to stand while working on loading/unloading the cars. To make up for this shortcoming, every car has a plank of wood to serve as a walkway and a work platform bridging from the car to the loading area.

 

I'm impressed that the loading area's elevated wooden walkway does NOT seem to be all soaked with oil!

 

It is clear that the tank car closest to the camera has the tank secured to the underframe by a cable that encirles the dome. The rest of the cars in the photo might have a more 'modern' tank anchorage.

 

What a glimpse into life over a century ago

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2020 1:17 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)

 

Photo: Loading Oil (Undated - Early 1900s?)

A photo from the Gateway To Oklahoma History website:

https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1593835/?q=loading

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

I'm guess the time period is early 1900s.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Claus Schlund wrote:

Note that NONE of the tank cars come equipped with any sort of dome platform nor any real place for employees to stand while working on loading/unloading the cars. To make up for this shortcoming, every car has a plank of wood to serve as a walkway and a work platform bridging from the car to the loading area.

        I did love the somewhat precarious looking planks.

It is clear that the tank car closest to the camera has the tank secured to the underframe by a cable that encirles the dome. The rest of the cars in the photo might have a more 'modern' tank anchorage.

    It's not a cable, it's a rod, called a dome yoke, and is attached on both sides. It prevents rotation around the long axis of the tank. The invention of the center anchor obviated the need for these yokes.

Tony Thompson