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Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

A photo from the Utah State Historical Society:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6zp4jhz

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Looks like boring, tough work.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Dry.  You forgot dry.  Handling salt makes your skin very dry and the skin on your fingers can simply break open.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 08, 2020 12:38 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

 

Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

A photo from the Utah State Historical Society:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6zp4jhz

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Looks like boring, tough work.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Josh
 

Photo was taken on the Inland Railway, which was owned by the Inland Crystal Salt Company. It was a tiny little line on the southern edge of the Great Salt Lake that interchanged with Union Pacific and the Salt Lake, Garfield & Western. Owned an 0-6-0 saddle tank switcher and a number of decrepit ancient wood boxcars and gondolas that were used only to transfer salt from the evaporation ponds to the packing plant.

Don Strack has a page for this operation here: https://utahrails.net/industries/inland-crystal-salt.php

 


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

The car in the photo is very interesting. It looks to me like an 1890s design, now of course downgraded to an in-plant car. Note that there is no air brake hose showing. By the 1890s most cars of this type would have had air brakes. Very likely air brakes are not used on this plant operation, and the hose has probably rotted off or was removed during repairs. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Tue, Sep 8, 2020 at 3:06 PM Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Dry.  You forgot dry.  Handling salt makes your skin very dry and the skin on your fingers can simply break open.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 08, 2020 12:38 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

 

Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)

A photo from the Utah State Historical Society:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6zp4jhz

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Looks like boring, tough work.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Brian Termunde
 

Bob,
Thanks once again for a wonderful photo!

A number of years ago, (way past the time frame this wonderful and educational group focuses on - so I am sorry!) I was aboard a passenger train (again off topic . . . sorry!) heading east across the Nevada desert. A little girl, in her unintentionally loud voice said, "Grandma, is THAT snow?" her grandmother told her no, it was alkali. Not that the kid knew what that was.

The next morning we were finally nearing Salt Lake and were passing the salt plants west of here when that little one asked her grandmother, "Grandma, is THAT snow?" She sighed, and told the girl no, that it was SALT. There was a pause, and then the child snorted, "Yeah, RIGHT!" the rest of us burst out laughing! How could she being so young understand that it was indeed salt.

Sorry, but this post brought back this delightful memory.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)
From: Bob Chaparro
Date: Tue, 08 Sep 2020 09:37:36 PDT
Photo: Loading Salt Into A Boxcar (1921)
A photo from the Utah State Historical Society:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Looks like boring, tough work.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA