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Photo: NYC Depressed Center Flat 499051


Bob Chaparro
 


StephenK
 

It's an interesting photo, for sure, and it brings up an interesting point.   All of the "big transformer" loads I have ever seen on a model railroad are of a new transformer.   This burnt  up transformer would be a unique load.

Steve Kay


Bruce Smith
 

Steve,

Interesting point. I’ve always thought about old transformer loads, usually in the context of an “upgrade” to an existing facility. When I visited the Safe Harbor Hydroelectric generating station (on the PRR’s Coukmbia and Port Deposit branch and next to the PRR’s A&S Low grade freight line) a few years ago at one of the PRRT&HS’ annual meetings, I was stunned to learn that the transformers were original to the 1930-1931 construction. So much for my 1944 transformer loads to the dam… What I am saying is that there may be very few reasons to ship old transformers and that this fire damaged transformer may be one of the few examples. OTOH, there are a number of examples of new transformers being delivered to the several hydroelectric stations on the PRR’s C&PD branch. These may be replacements/upgrades or they may be expansions of the facilities.

BTW, the Safe harbor dam provided electric power for the PRR’s catenary, moving freight cars, including those carrying transformers ;)

Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D., 

Director, Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer

Professor of Pathobiology                     

121 Scott-Ritchey Research Center

1265 H.C. Morgan Drive

Auburn University, AL  36849-5525

334-844-5587, 334-844-5850 (fax)

smithbf@...

http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/faculty/smith-bruce/

*********************************************************************************

"Evolution is a fact, get used to it"




On Jan 17, 2020, at 8:31 AM, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:

It's an interesting photo, for sure, and it brings up an interesting point.   All of the "big transformer" loads I have ever seen on a model railroad are of a new transformer.   This burnt  up transformer would be a unique load.

Steve Kay


Andy Carlson
 

Around 2008 I was invited to look at the Snohomish hydro power plant. Built around the turn of the century with a penstock tunneled into the bedrock adjacent to the Snohomish Falls. The power turbines were at the base of the penstock tunnel and water exited into the lower Falls pond. The engineer who was kind to show the operation to me and a friend was justifiably proud that that the original wireing for the antique generator was still woven fabric cloth insulated. He was most proud, however, that an original light bulb over 100 years old was still lit 24/7. Mr Edison should be proud!
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Friday, January 17, 2020, 6:45:16 AM PST, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Steve,

........... When I visited the Safe Harbor Hydroelectric generating station (on the PRR’s Coukmbia and Port Deposit branch and next to the PRR’s A&S Low grade freight line) a few years ago at one of the PRRT&HS’ annual meetings, I was stunned to learn that the transformers were original to the 1930-1931 construction.
_._,_._,_


Doug Polinder
 

Andy, might you be referring to Snoqualmie Falls?  I'm not aware of any falls on the Snohomish River.  The Snoqualmie and Skykomish rivers converge to form the Snohomish.  The Skykomish is known to steam-era freight-car enthusiasts, of course, as the Great Northern's west-slope Cascade Mountain access to Stevens Pass and the Cascade Tunnel.

Doug Polinder
Poquoson VA


espee4441
 

The Skykomish River is by far the main water running tributary to the GN but as for Cascade Tunnel it's actually the Tye River which then obviously dumps into the south fork of the Sky. At Index is where the south and north forks combine with the mainline crossing the north right at Index itself. Spent way too many nights in the car at Scenic waiting for action to hit/exit the tunnel and listening to the Tye since it's the only thing besides critters that move there. 

Tony Pawley