Photo: OSL/UP Automobile Boxcar 160495 (1928)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: OSL/UP Automobile Boxcar 160495 (1928)

A photo from the University of Wyoming:

http://digitalcollections.uwyo.edu/luna/servlet/detail/ahcludwig~1~1~3433511~304777:Box-car-wreck?qvq=q:boxcar&mi=3&trs=6

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Probably same car, detail:

http://digitalcollections.uwyo.edu/luna/servlet/detail/ahcludwig~1~1~3433465~304823:Box-car-wreck?qvq=q:boxcar&mi=2&trs=6

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: OSL/UP Automobile Boxcar 160495 (1928)
A photo from the University of Wyoming:

Great photo of the Westerfield kit! First one I ever built. 

Tony Thompson





Chris Barkan
 


I was curious what the label on the door said so I copied, enlarged, revised the perspective, and enhanced its contrast.  I think it says "Loaded on This Side".  Any other interpretations?
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Chris Barkan
 

Actually, I think it says "Loaded From This Side".
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Bruce Smith
 

Chris,

Interpretation: The car was loaded from that side 😉

If you're asking why that should matter, it seems like this is probably a hint to unload from that side. Why they wouldn't just say that instead is a good question. Obviously, in loading the car, especially the center of the car, there is eventually bias in the loading with respect to the door. Perhaps this load doesn't require unloading from the side it was loaded from but knowledge of the loading bias would help in the process of unloading?

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Chris Barkan <cplbarkan@...>
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 6:30 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: OSL/UP Automobile Boxcar 160495 (1928)
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

I was curious what the label on the door said so I copied, enlarged, revised the perspective, and enhanced its contrast.  I think it says "Loaded on This Side".  Any other interpretations?
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Chris Barkan
 

Hah hah, yeah I understood the literal meaning, "interpretation" was a poor choice of words on my part.  I was just asking if others agreed that that was what it said.  I have seen other variations of this sort of message and was just bringing it to the attention of others on the list.

I have some other questions about the car's design features.  It appears that the right-most stringer on the right side of the car (the side shown) is curved upward between two of the cross-ties near the door.  Does anyone know the explanation for this?  Also, I assume that the four square external "pockets"  on either side of the doors are related to the automobile securement chains inside the car but would welcome any additional or alternative explanation.

Thanks!
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Guy Wilber
 

Chris Barkan wrote:

"I have some other questions about the car's design features.  It appears that the right-most stringer on the right side of the car (the side shown) is curved upward between two of the cross-ties near the door.  Does anyone know the explanation for this?"

I believe that the stringer has been bent upwards due to some sort of collision and is the emphasis for the photo.  

  
"Also, I assume that the four square external "pockets"  on either side of the doors are related to the automobile securement chains inside the car but would welcome any additional or alternative explanation."

The cast "pockets" added into the car side allowed  beams to be fitted across the width of the car, thus allowing a second floor to be added for "decking" automobiles.  This was an early experiment for expediting the "decking" process.  The pockets had nothing to do with securement chains.  The automobiles would have been secured to the floors with wood blocking along with wire, rope or any number of patented metal clips.  

There is a Railway Age article regarding the design of the car including the facilities for "decking".  I'll look it up and pass along the link. 

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada .   



--

_._,_._,_


Charlie Vlk
 

All-
It looks like it reads:

Loaded From 
 “This Side”

(caps and lower case as typed, quote marks on lower line and centered).

Charlie Vlk


On Jun 21, 2021, at 6:30 AM, Chris Barkan <cplbarkan@...> wrote:


I was curious what the label on the door said so I copied, enlarged, revised the perspective, and enhanced its contrast.  I think it says "Loaded on This Side".  Any other interpretations?
<OSL 160495 Union Pacific 40_ single-sheathed automobile boxcar-label on door-PS.jpg>
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Agreed.  “From,” not “on.”

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Barkan
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 7:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: OSL/UP Automobile Boxcar 160495 (1928)

 

Actually, I think it says "Loaded From This Side".
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Jun 21, 2021 at 08:07 AM, Guy Wilber wrote:
"I have some other questions about the car's design features.  It appears that the right-most stringer on the right side of the car (the side shown) is curved upward between two of the cross-ties near the door.  Does anyone know the explanation for this?"
 
I believe that the stringer has been bent upwards due to some sort of collision and is the emphasis for the photo.  
I agree the stringer in the photo has received damage. But, because these cars were revolutionary when built and received a lot of press, extensive write ups in both Railway Review and Railway Mechanical Engineer, it should be noted that the stringer arrangement was somewhat unusual. These light section stringers weren't straight, but rather formed a rather flat ellipse in plan view; terminating at the bolster / centersill connection, and swelling outward until near the side sill in the area of the door opening. I have no idea what the design intent was, but the construction is well documented.

Surprisingly, at least one of these cars made it into preservation; there were several, still equipped with K brakes at the Commonwealth Edison Fisk Street generating station during the eighties, and one of them went to The Henry Ford museum, because the museum had a photo of Model T's being loaded in double deck fashion in a similar car. I have no idea if the car is still there, it was rough, to say the least, and my "inside" source has moved on years ago. The museum's web site makes no mention of the car.

Dennis Storzek
 


Andy Carlson
 

About 10 or so years ago, Dan Smith showed me a storage box car at a smaller industrial site. This was in Lodi, CA, made famous from the Creedence Clearwater Reunion's top charting song. It was great to see the subject' car's stamped steel pockets so plainly visible, even from a distance. Returning to the same site a couple years later, the discovery of this great-condition UP autocar's disapearance was very sad. I fear that it was most likely scrapped; after all, this is California where the preserving of fine relics is mostly ignored by otherwise good RR museums.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Surprisingly, at least one of these cars made it into preservation; there were several, still equipped with K brakes at the Commonwealth Edison Fisk Street generating station during the eighties, and one of them went to The Henry Ford museum, because the museum had a photo of Model T's being loaded in double deck fashion in a similar car. I have no idea if the car is still there, it was rough, to say the least, and my "inside" source has moved on years ago. The museum's web site makes no mention of the car.

Dennis Storzek