Photo: Pickle Car6 further question


mel perry
 

john:
are you fimilar with the.HJH boxcars/reefes? were they 34 or 36 footers? and  did the two paint schemes
have anything to do with their size?
were plans/drawings of these ever
published
thanks
;-)
mel perry


On Fri, Jun 25, 2021, 12:57 PM John <jbopp007@...> wrote:
The Heinz 57 SIG was quite active from 1984 through, maybe, 1991.  It was fairly large, too.  I was member #90 and by no means the last.  Al Westerfield was member #1.  There were four to six newsletters per year, some of them running to twenty pages, IIRC.  In the beginning, plenty of Heinz freight car photos and other information came to light.  But, eventually, that well dried up and interest fell off.  As there was little new information to be found there were fewer newsletters.  Eventually the group shut down.

John Bopp
Farmington Hills, MI
Modeling the Nineteen Aughts


Eric Hansmann
 

Mel,

 

Part of your answer lies in your years of focus.

 

 

The October 1926 ORER (page 882) lists the following for HJ Heinz Refrigerator cars.

400-502 :: Outside length 36-ft, 1-in; 1953 cubic foot capacity; 60,000 lbs capacity - 34 cars
A notation for these cars indicates they are insulated but do not have ice tanks or ventilating devices.

400-502 :: Outside length 36-ft, 1-in; 1953 cubic foot capacity; 50,000 lbs capacity - 7 cars
A note indicates these are for car #s 424, 448, 472, 482, 488, 496, and 502.
Another notation indicates they are insulated but do not have ice tanks or ventilating devices.

The January 1943 ORER only lists pickle and vinegar tank cars in the HJ Heinz fleet (page 855). There are no refrigerator or insulated boxcars.

What years do you model?

 

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mel perry
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 10:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Pickle Car6 further question

 

john:

are you fimilar with the.HJH boxcars/reefes? were they 34 or 36 footers? and  did the two paint schemes

have anything to do with their size?

were plans/drawings of these ever

published

thanks

;-)

mel perry

On Fri, Jun 25, 2021, 12:57 PM John <jbopp007@...> wrote:

The Heinz 57 SIG was quite active from 1984 through, maybe, 1991.  It was fairly large, too.  I was member #90 and by no means the last.  Al Westerfield was member #1.  There were four to six newsletters per year, some of them running to twenty pages, IIRC.  In the beginning, plenty of Heinz freight car photos and other information came to light.  But, eventually, that well dried up and interest fell off.  As there was little new information to be found there were fewer newsletters.  Eventually the group shut down.

 

John Bopp

Farmington Hills, MI

Modeling the Nineteen Aughts


John
 

Mel,

I’m away from home this week, so going on memory…  The early Heinz house cars (the 300 and 400 series) were 34’.  These cars are the prototype for the Westerfield kit.  Heinz didn’t provide much information about their cars in ORERs.  Their house cars were all listed as refrigerator cars even though most were actually insulated boxcars, lacking ice bunkers and hatches. The Heinz cars were frequently repainted, often with different billboards.  The earliest paint scheme had white sides, next came oxide red, and finally yellow.  Sometime around the late teens/early twenties the colorful billboards were replaced with a large 57.  The cars were also renumbered at some point, so it’s hard to keep track of individual cars.

A J. H. Geissel drawing of HJH 484, one of the true reefers, appeared in the July,1954 MR.  I realize many of Geissel’s drawings are thought to be a bit suspect these days, but this one appears to match up pretty well with a surviving prototype photo.  However, while these early Heinz cars are generally similar, they differ in many details, including style of fascia and end sill as well as number and location of grabirons, corner braces, and door hinges, and perhaps others. 

The Westerfield 3900 series kits include a nice history of these Heinz cars as well as a summary of their variations.

John Bopp

Farmington Hills, MI

Modeling the Nineteen Aughts