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Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Great shot, incredibly clear.  But the mere thought of wanting to model that load gives me a very bad headache!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 1:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

 

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bob Chaparro
 

An old Chinese proverb says, "The modeling of a million piece pulpwood load begins with a first stick."

I read this in a fortune cookie message. The other side of the message had a one-step tip for fixing the underframe of an InterMountain reefer.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Awesome photo! I especially like the gondola closest to the camera – it has a hole punched into the side, and the side plates are rusted thru near the bottom.
 
While I cannot identify the gondola based on visible lettering, the construction and the rivet pattern tells me it is definitely a PRR class GS (or GS subclass) gondola
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: 10 June, 2020 13:21
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977
 

Great shot, incredibly clear.  But the mere thought of wanting to model that load gives me a very bad headache!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 1:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

 

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bob,

(Here I go again!) I suspect this photo is somewhat mislabeled. The loads are may be shake wood on its way to a shingle mill. 

Nice photo though. Good find.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 1:16 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRL&P Pulpwood Car 1977

An undated photo from the Oregon Historical Society. Library:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/train-with-cord-wood

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit and shows good detail.

PRL&P was the Portland Railway, Light & Power Company, a railway company and electric power utility in Portland, Oregon, from 1906 until 1924.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Todd Sullivan
 

But correct 'Chingish' would be, "Model million pulpwood load begins first stick."  No 'a' or 'the' in Mandarin, ditto prepositions.

Todd Sullivan
who learned Chinglish from my dear wife who is from Beijing.


akerboomk
 

I like all the cars

1st car – cut (dimensional?) wood on bulkhead flat

2nd/3rd cars – random pieces parts

4th car – most of it looks like the parts that are cut off the outside of the log before they cut the dimensional lumber.  Up near the top, there looks to be a cut piece (about) the size of a railroad tie.

 

Could it be for firing a boiler of some sort?

 

Ken


--
Ken Akerboom


William Canelos
 

Back in the day "cordwood"  was sold at various outlets or could be delivered to your home for heating purposes.  pulp wood was left whole(not split like seen in the photo).

Cheers & Beers,

Bill