Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)

A Charles “Teenie” Harris photo from the Carnegie Museum of Art:

https://collection.cmoa.org/objects/6e9840bc-19ca-4b61-84bd-51c567d70d8e

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jack Mullen
 

Quite a few interesting things if you look closely. Just to mention a couple, Union RR gon with a very large crankshaft in the foreground, and the Pacific Coast gon in the background is a bit of a surprise.

Jack Mullen


Richard Townsend
 

The Pacific Coast gon caught my eye, too. That's a railroad I know nothing about, though I have a vague sense about where it is located. What happened to that railroad?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 25, 2022 12:27 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)

Quite a few interesting things if you look closely. Just to mention a couple, Union RR gon with a very large crankshaft in the foreground, and the Pacific Coast gon in the background is a bit of a surprise.

Jack Mullen


Richard Townsend
 

And as for the gondola with the large crankshaft, I guess that means the 4-truck Wabash flatcar was not available (modelers of a certain age will remember Gordon Odegard's scratchbuilding "Dollar Model Project" from MR, later reprinted in Kalmbach's "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars.")

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Richard and List Members,


If you model in the correct scale, you can buy the Gordon Odegard crankshaft as a laser cut kit today...


https://www.ebay.com/itm/354233870343


Claus Schlund


On 25-Aug-22 15:49, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:

And as for the gondola with the large crankshaft, I guess that means the 4-truck Wabash flatcar was not available (modelers of a certain age will remember Gordon Odegard's scratchbuilding "Dollar Model Project" from MR, later reprinted in Kalmbach's "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars.")

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Bruce Smith
 

Claus,

You can get it HO scale too 😉

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2022 6:49 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Hi Richard and List Members,


If you model in the correct scale, you can buy the Gordon Odegard crankshaft as a laser cut kit today...


https://www.ebay.com/itm/354233870343


Claus Schlund


On 25-Aug-22 15:49, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:

And as for the gondola with the large crankshaft, I guess that means the 4-truck Wabash flatcar was not available (modelers of a certain age will remember Gordon Odegard's scratchbuilding "Dollar Model Project" from MR, later reprinted in Kalmbach's "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars.")

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Who would have thunk?!?


Claus Schlund



On 25-Aug-22 19:53, Bruce Smith wrote:

Claus,

You can get it HO scale too 😉

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2022 6:49 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Hi Richard and List Members,


If you model in the correct scale, you can buy the Gordon Odegard crankshaft as a laser cut kit today...


https://www.ebay.com/itm/354233870343


Claus Schlund


On 25-Aug-22 15:49, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:
And as for the gondola with the large crankshaft, I guess that means the 4-truck Wabash flatcar was not available (modelers of a certain age will remember Gordon Odegard's scratchbuilding "Dollar Model Project" from MR, later reprinted in Kalmbach's "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars.")

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


John
 

There are not one, but two versions of this crankshaft available in HO. There is the AMB Laserkit version already mentioned and this one, from Bitter Creek Models. https://bittercreekmodels.com/page5.html#FREIGHTCARLOADS

The Bitter Creek version is actually closer to the prototype.

John Bopp 
Farmington Hills MI
Modeling the Nineteen Aughts


Todd Sullivan
 

Richard,

The Pacific Coast Railroad (different from the 3' n.g. PC Rys of Calif and Wash) was a steam powered short line just south of Seattle that hauled coal from a few mines in the western slopes of the Cascades.  The PCRR was owned by the GN, which took it over operationally when the PCRR began to fail.  There are a number of photos in Warren Wing's 3 volumes of "A Northwest Rail Pictorial".  I think the operation wrapped up in the mid to late 1950s, and I do recall seeing at least one PCRR coal gondola in Portland after I arrived there in the summer of 1957.

Todd Sullivan
High and dry north of Dallas TX


Andy Carlson
 

A little additional thoughts on the WA state std gauge Pacific Coast Railroad (Not "railway). The simularity with the name of the California Central Coast 3' narrow gauge line of "Pacific Coast Railway" is not  coincidence. The Pacific Coast steamship Lines owned both RRs for a long time, going back into and before the turn of the century. The WA PCRR shops even built some equipment for the narrow gauge line. The ownership of the standard gauge line became GN's after the end and scrapping of the PCRY narrow gauge line in the early 1940s.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Thursday, August 25, 2022 at 06:46:55 PM PDT, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Richard,

The Pacific Coast Railroad (different from the 3' n.g. PC Rys of Calif and Wash) was a steam powered short line just south of Seattle that hauled coal from a few mines in the western slopes of the Cascades.  The PCRR was owned by the GN, which took it over operationally when the PCRR began to fail.  There are a number of photos in Warren Wing's 3 volumes of "A Northwest Rail Pictorial".  I think the operation wrapped up in the mid to late 1950s, and I do recall seeing at least one PCRR coal gondola in Portland after I arrived there in the summer of 1957.

Todd Sullivan
High and dry north of Dallas TX


Steve Stull
 

On a side note, I noticed an ad in that same listing for an N scale 1962 Turbo Encabulator.  
Also available in HO. 

Sorry, I can't help it, being an Engineer, things like that are too funny to pass up.

For any who may not know what a Turbo Encabulator is, look it up on youtube. 

Enjoy. ;)

Steve Stull
winslow 7076

On Thursday, August 25, 2022 at 03:49:58 PM AKDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi Richard and List Members,


If you model in the correct scale, you can buy the Gordon Odegard crankshaft as a laser cut kit today...


https://www.ebay.com/itm/354233870343


Claus Schlund


On 25-Aug-22 15:49, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:
And as for the gondola with the large crankshaft, I guess that means the 4-truck Wabash flatcar was not available (modelers of a certain age will remember Gordon Odegard's scratchbuilding "Dollar Model Project" from MR, later reprinted in Kalmbach's "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars.")

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


earlyrail
 

Pacific Coast gons were around in numbers in the mid 60's.
I have several photos from my Navy days ion the Seattle area.
Merged in the the BN merger.

Howard Garner


Jeff Helm
 

Those high side Pacific Coast gons with the billboard lettering really stand out.  After the GN purchased the line, they transferred some old GN gons to replace even older worn out coal hauling gons.  One of theses still exists at a railroad museum near Seattle.  I have a couple of posts on my blog about that gon and the PCRR history.
--
Cheers

Jeff Helm
The Olympic Peninsula Branch
https://olympicpeninsulabranch.blogspot.com/


Doug Polinder
 

To add to Todd's comments, the Milwaukee used trackage rights on the PCRR from Maple Valley through Renton (think Boeing and PC&F) to reach Black River Junction and strung catenary.  So at one time I believe it was possible to see steam, diesels, and electrics operating on the same (albeit short) stretch of line (just like on the GN main through Stevens Pass when it was still electrified).

Doug Polinder
wishing in South Texas that we got as much rain as Dallas did a few days ago


David Smith
 

Love how all the model versions are carefully blocked, but the prototype is apparently just dumped in the gon. Inbound as scrap, perhaps, or did someone decide that a thing that big wasn’t going to get hurt by a little jostling around?

Dave Smith


Eric Hansmann
 

Some of these gondola loads might be short hauls between different local mills. US Steel had a few operations in metro Pittsburgh, as did Jones & Laughlin. Low speed local hauls may not have warranted the time and expense of careful blocking.
 
 
Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN
 

On 08/27/2022 6:48 AM CDT David Smith <dlsio4@...> wrote:
 
 
Love how all the model versions are carefully blocked, but the prototype is apparently just dumped in the gon. Inbound as scrap, perhaps, or did someone decide that a thing that big wasn’t going to get hurt by a little jostling around?

Dave Smith
 

 


gtws00
 

Ken, I have been using Albion Brass wire. It comes in metric and I buy .4mm which is .016
Here is a link to a source that sells here in the states> Many other special shapes and micro tubing.
ALBBW04 Albion Alloys Brass Rod - 0.4mm (10pcs) - Sprue Brothers Models LLC

George Toman


Tim O'Connor
 


Pacific Coast was a shortline built to move locally mined coal. It shared track with the Milwaukee in the
Maple Valley and I think it was controlled by the Great Northern. It brought coal into Seattle.

The photo shows the PCR yard between the NP and MILW yards, in 1930.


On 8/25/2022 3:43 PM, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:

The Pacific Coast gon caught my eye, too. That's a railroad I know nothing about, though I have a vague sense about where it is located. What happened to that railroad?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 25, 2022 12:27 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)

Quite a few interesting things if you look closely. Just to mention a couple, Union RR gon with a very large crankshaft in the foreground, and the Pacific Coast gon in the background is a bit of a surprise.

Jack Mullen


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


I'd love to see photos of Pacific Coast gondolas ! :-)

On 8/26/2022 7:41 AM, earlyrail wrote:

Pacific Coast gons were around in numbers in the mid 60's.
I have several photos from my Navy days ion the Seattle area.
Merged in the the BN merger.

Howard Garner


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Doug Polinder
 

Oh look at that: no Interstate 5, no Alaskan Way, and no Space Needle.  Just the Smith Tower, tallest building on the West Coast for some years (42 stories).

Tim, there is at least one very nice picture of PCRR gons in the Yaremko GN book (don't have my copy handy but will by tomorrow night).  I believe Champ did decals for these and I will check my 1990 catalog when I get back to Michigan tomorrow night.

I believe some of the PCRR coal ended up at the University of Washington powerplant on Lake Washington west of the UW campus (NP branch, now the Burke-Gilman trail).  I do not know anything about the BTU or sulfur content of Washington coal, 

Doug Polinder
Seguin TX