Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)


Richard Townsend
 

Champ did do Pacific Coast decals. HG-126 and OG-126. Champ calls out "red" (BCR) as the car color.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Polinder via groups.io <mikado3399@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 28, 2022 7:55 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)

Oh look at that: no Interstate 5, no Alaskan Way, and no Space Needle.  Just the Smith Tower, tallest building on the West Coast for some years (42 stories).

Tim, there is at least one very nice picture of PCRR gons in the Yaremko GN book (don't have my copy handy but will by tomorrow night).  I believe Champ did decals for these and I will check my 1990 catalog when I get back to Michigan tomorrow night.

I believe some of the PCRR coal ended up at the University of Washington powerplant on Lake Washington west of the UW campus (NP branch, now the Burke-Gilman trail).  I do not know anything about the BTU or sulfur content of Washington coal, 

Doug Polinder
Seguin TX


Jeff Helm
 

Tim

check out the Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive.  They have a number of PCRR photos here http://www.pnrarchive.org/_layouts/15/start.aspx#/Lists/Pacific_Coast_Railroad_Photos/StdView.aspx

There are a few at various historical blogs on the Black Diamond area coal mines in Washington also, like this one 

https://www.historylink.org/file/20619 


Also check the University of Washington and Tacoma Public Library sites.  Earlier gons were wood, later steel and at the end in the late 1960’s some ore cars were used.
--
Cheers

Jeff Helm
The Olympic Peninsula Branch
https://olympicpeninsulabranch.blogspot.com/


Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Tim and List Members,


Thanks Tim for the excellent image you sent. Some things I found interesting...


* Engine terminal on the right, it looks like the roundhouse may have been added onto over the years, based on the roof construction


* Compound ladder in the yard!


* Platform flat cars at the extreme left side of the image


* Structure with ALBERS billboard lettering in the distance (grain elevator?)


* What appears to be both railroad and roadway trestles across and above the yard


* Pole storage yard by buildings on left side of image


* And naturally the awesome PACIFIC COAST composite gon


Claus Schlund


On 28-Aug-22 18:51, Tim O'Connor wrote:


Pacific Coast was a shortline built to move locally mined coal. It shared track with the Milwaukee in the
Maple Valley and I think it was controlled by the Great Northern. It brought coal into Seattle.

The photo shows the PCR yard between the NP and MILW yards, in 1930.


Tony Thompson
 

Doug Polinder wrote:

Tim, there is at least one very nice picture of PCRR gons in the Yaremko GN book (don't have my copy handy but will by tomorrow night). I believe Champ did decals for these and I will check my 1990 catalog when I get back to Michigan tomorrow night.

I believe some of the PCRR coal ended up at the University of Washington powerplant on Lake Washington west of the UW campus (NP branch, now the Burke-Gilman trail). I do not know anything about the BTU or sulfur content of Washington coal,
Don’t know if it was Maple Valley coal, but when I was at UW in the early 1960s, with an office in Roberts Hall alongside the track to the power plant, an NP switcher would bring a single NP offset hopper of coal, mid-afternoon, about every other day.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Paul Krueger
 

The Pacific Coast is very well documented, especially for the years after the GN took over in 1951, by photos and records available at Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive. PNRA published a book on it a few years ago.  A few copies are still available and can be purchased through the GN society.


https://gnrhs.myshopify.com/collections/books/products/pacific-coast-railway

I’ve sifted through several boxes of daily PCRR waybills from the late fifties and the coal seemed to exclusively stay in King County. I recall a lot going to the UW, some going to a large concrete plant along the Duwamish River in Seattle, and I think there may have been some going to the NP at Auburn. 


Paul Krueger 
Seattle, WA