Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)

A photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:

https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Image/IM35439

Partial car number is 20053.

Also partial view of Hocking Valley boxcar.

Description:

“National Guard troops unloading their supplies from New York Central railroad cars into a transport wagon to be taken to camp.”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparrowrote:

Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)
A photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:
Partial car number is 20053.

Of course most of them are having fun sitting on the car roofs, not helping with the unloading.

Tony Thompson




SamClarke
 

Tony and group,

 

I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?

 

Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?


Frank Pearsall
 

Good afternoon all:

He is wearing boots, so he’s an officer. The other soldiers are wearing leggings.

Frank Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.

On May 13, 2021, at 4:43 PM, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:

Tony and group, 
 
I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?
 
Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…
 
 
Sam Clarke
R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist
Kadee Quality Products Co.
541-826-3883
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Chad Rogers
 

When I was in service & assigned to duty as a Battalion Armorer when transporting weapons &/or ammunition or other sensitive items we were to carry a firearm, typically a pistol. Perhaps similar. Back then could also be money shipments for payday activities or whatever they called it back then. 

Be well,

Chad C. Rogers
Jefferson City, Tenn. USA

On May 13, 2021, at 16:43, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:



Tony and group,

 

I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?

 

Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?


Ray Breyer
 

This is 1917: officers were always armed when around "scum", and sergeants usually carried stout sticks.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



On Thursday, May 13, 2021, 06:06:49 PM CDT, Chad Rogers <chadshobbies@...> wrote:


When I was in service & assigned to duty as a Battalion Armorer when transporting weapons &/or ammunition or other sensitive items we were to carry a firearm, typically a pistol. Perhaps similar. Back then could also be money shipments for payday activities or whatever they called it back then. 

Be well,

Chad C. Rogers
Jefferson City, Tenn. USA

On May 13, 2021, at 16:43, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:



Tony and group,

 

I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?

 

Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?


Bob Chaparro
 

Larry King commented on the Early Rail Group:
Here's some background about the NYC car:
NYC 220093 was from Lot 222-B,(NYC 220000-221999 built 1907 by ACF St Charles. Formerly NYC&HR 99000-100999. These cars were the 1907 NYC system standard design written up in "American Engineer and Railroad Journal" March 1907 pg92-95. This is available on line. The change from NYC&HR to NYC started in 1914 when the NYC&HR and LS&MS railroads merged to become the NYC. This car exhibits partial modernization in that it has a new door with a horizontal stiffener and an outside metal roof replacing the original plain door and wood roof.
It still has its original underframe which had the needle beams passing under the center sills(.NYC  in 1912 developed a "Repair Steel Underframe" for these cars that was of heavier construction with 6 instead of 4 truss rods , having the center sills and needle beams in the same plane and a box section center sill with top and bottom cover plates.) Many cars also got the 7+7 inward Murphy ends that the NYC also pioneered about the same time. This car still has wood ends. One interesting feature of these cars was the exposed wood end sill, unlike most wood cars where the sheathing covered the end sills. This was true both on original and steel end cars.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA