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Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67531/rec/70

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Not much information on the Speas Company:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Ken Vandevoort <apo09324@...>
 

I worked at my uncle's grocery store while a high school student in the early 60's.  We sold Speas Vinegar.  We also had bulk vinegar (apple cider and distilled white) in barrels for those that brought their own containers.  The concrete floor under the pumps was eroded almost to the steel decking.  That would explain why the car tanks are wood.

Ken Vandevoort
New London, IA


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

In October 1956 Speas Company operated 11 vinegar tank cars. SVMX 1 was an 8K gallon TM car, while the rest were 9K gallon TW cars numbered 121-130. The reporting address for these cars was a Speas Company office in Kansas City, Missouri.

Given that both cars in this photo have their car numbers obliterated, I would suggest they were awaiting scrapping. Note that the car closest to the camera has an additional horizontal brace on the right-hand tank which is missing from the left tank.

Wikipedia has a short page on Speas Company at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company . It is mostly about a factory building in Charlotte, North Carolina (now a brewery). I also found a photo of their KC plant at https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A103787 . A search on "Speas Company" on that page turned up a whole bunch of other photos of the plant, but sadly no other tank car photos. A google image search found a photo of a Speas plant in Paris, Texas, but it requires a Facebook log-in and I'm not a member.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 10:11 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67531/rec/70

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Not much information on the Speas Company:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


mel perry
 

it appears that the cross braces on the
front tank have been disconnected, 
lacking any data on the cars themselves,
agree that they are in a scrap line
;-)
mel perry

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021, 3:24 AM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

In October 1956 Speas Company operated 11 vinegar tank cars. SVMX 1 was an 8K gallon TM car, while the rest were 9K gallon TW cars numbered 121-130. The reporting address for these cars was a Speas Company office in Kansas City, Missouri.

Given that both cars in this photo have their car numbers obliterated, I would suggest they were awaiting scrapping. Note that the car closest to the camera has an additional horizontal brace on the right-hand tank which is missing from the left tank.

Wikipedia has a short page on Speas Company at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company . It is mostly about a factory building in Charlotte, North Carolina (now a brewery). I also found a photo of their KC plant at https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A103787 . A search on "Speas Company" on that page turned up a whole bunch of other photos of the plant, but sadly no other tank car photos. A google image search found a photo of a Speas plant in Paris, Texas, but it requires a Facebook log-in and I'm not a member.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 10:11 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67531/rec/70

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Not much information on the Speas Company:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


 

Not missing; just disconnected at the turnbuckle. Both pieces remain with the car.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, January 2, 2021 at 5:23 AM
To: <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

 

Friends,

 

In October 1956 Speas Company operated 11 vinegar tank cars. SVMX 1 was an 8K gallon TM car, while the rest were 9K gallon TW cars numbered 121-130. The reporting address for these cars was a Speas Company office in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

Given that both cars in this photo have their car numbers obliterated, I would suggest they were awaiting scrapping. Note that the car closest to the camera has an additional horizontal brace on the right-hand tank which is missing from the left tank.

 

Wikipedia has a short page on Speas Company at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company . It is mostly about a factory building in Charlotte, North Carolina (now a brewery). I also found a photo of their KC plant at https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A103787 . A search on "Speas Company" on that page turned up a whole bunch of other photos of the plant, but sadly no other tank car photos. A google image search found a photo of a Speas plant in Paris, Texas, but it requires a Facebook log-in and I'm not a member.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 10:11 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67531/rec/70

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Not much information on the Speas Company:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Scott Kremer
 

I could be wrong but if you check page118 of David Leider’s great book on the pickle/vinegar industry you will find an in service photo of that car.

Scott Kremer

On Jan 2, 2021, at 6:29 AM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

it appears that the cross braces on the
front tank have been disconnected, 
lacking any data on the cars themselves,
agree that they are in a scrap line
;-)
mel perry

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021, 3:24 AM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

In October 1956 Speas Company operated 11 vinegar tank cars. SVMX 1 was an 8K gallon TM car, while the rest were 9K gallon TW cars numbered 121-130. The reporting address for these cars was a Speas Company office in Kansas City, Missouri.

Given that both cars in this photo have their car numbers obliterated, I would suggest they were awaiting scrapping. Note that the car closest to the camera has an additional horizontal brace on the right-hand tank which is missing from the left tank.

Wikipedia has a short page on Speas Company at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company . It is mostly about a factory building in Charlotte, North Carolina (now a brewery). I also found a photo of their KC plant at https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A103787 . A search on "Speas Company" on that page turned up a whole bunch of other photos of the plant, but sadly no other tank car photos. A google image search found a photo of a Speas plant in Paris, Texas, but it requires a Facebook log-in and I'm not a member.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 10:11 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67531/rec/70

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Not much information on the Speas Company:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speas_Vinegar_Company

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA







David Leider
 

Scott,
You are correct. I have photos of 3 Speas Vinegar cars in my book. There is also a 2 page history of the Speas company. I still have copies of my  "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest" books available. A good reference for pickle and vinegar cars.


David Leider
 

Sorry, I forgot to sign my name
David Leider


Scott Kremer
 

I was at all of your presentations at the Naperville RPM meet, including the one on the pickle/vinegar industry.  You do an outstanding job. I have your very good book on the subject.  In fact after a number of years I am now in the process of making a model of the Speas facility in Wenatchee, Wa.  I have Sanborn maps and a couple of aerial photos which should be sufficient to allow me to produce a reasonable model.  It will have to be reduced slightly in some aspects but I think it will be easily recognizable.  I am curious.  Can you explain the piping involved in the process.  I read the part about rubber instead of metal but what is not clear is where the piping runs.  I cannot find any photos that make it clear where piping is run.

Thanks for all your work,

Scott

On Jan 2, 2021, at 8:25 PM, David Leider <sooauthor@...> wrote:

Scott,
You are correct. I have photos of 3 Speas Vinegar cars in my book. There is also a 2 page history of the Speas company. I still have copies of my  "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest" books available. A good reference for pickle and vinegar cars.


David Leider
 

Scott,
I enjoy giving the clinics at the RPM's. I even have a few ready to go, whenever that is.
As far as a photo showing the piping, I do not have one in the book. But the diagram on page 94 sums up the process nicely, but does not show the piping. The top tank holds the pulp (Where the pulp comes from is explained on page 77). The liquid then goes to the fermentator on the next floor where it is converted to vinegar. The raw vinegar goes into the bottom tank. It is then piped into the holding tanks in the storage area to age. 
I hope this helps. 
David Leider


Scott Kremer
 

It does help, thanks.  Because there are a number of photos of the tanks, etc and none of them show piping at the top of the tank I am going to assume that the piping is at ground or floor level and enters the tanks there.  Especially with outdoor tanks it may be that the piping was below ground to help prevent freezing.  Just a guess.

Scott

On Jan 3, 2021, at 9:51 PM, David Leider <sooauthor@...> wrote:

Scott,
I enjoy giving the clinics at the RPM's. I even have a few ready to go, whenever that is.
As far as a photo showing the piping, I do not have one in the book. But the diagram on page 94 sums up the process nicely, but does not show the piping. The top tank holds the pulp (Where the pulp comes from is explained on page 77). The liquid then goes to the fermentator on the next floor where it is converted to vinegar. The raw vinegar goes into the bottom tank. It is then piped into the holding tanks in the storage area to age. 
I hope this helps. 
David Leider


David Leider
 

Scott,
I would say you are correct assuming the pipes were below ground. Vinegar has a high proportion of water that will freeze.
David


ron christensen
 

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 01:16 AM, Ken Vandevoort wrote:
I worked at my uncle's grocery store while a high school student in the early 60's.  We sold Speas Vinegar.  We also had bulk vinegar (apple cider and distilled white) in barrels for those that brought their own containers.  The concrete floor under the pumps was eroded almost to the steel decking.  That would explain why the car tanks are wood.

Ken Vandevoort
New London, IA


ron christensen
 

try again
 I would guess most people who buy distilled white vinegar do not believe it is an alcohol based product.
 Apple vinegar is more expensive. I wonder how cold it has to get before distilled vinegar freezes?
Ron Christensen


Wallace Steinbrecher
 
Edited

Pure acetic acid will freeze at approximately 62 degrees F.  Vinegar (a 5% or so dilute form of acetic acid) will freeze at approximately 28 degrees F.

Regards,
Wallace Steinbrecher