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Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67550/rec/75

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Single-rivet course.

Built 1911.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


 

That’s a heck of a grade. LOL!

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Bob Chaparro via groups.io" <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, January 2, 2021 at 12:02 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

 

Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67550/rec/75

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Single-rivet course.

Built 1911.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dave Lawler
 

Those are rather interesting trucks on that tank car. Anyone know the manufacturer?

 

Dave Lawler

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


David
 

They look like typical L-section Andrews-style trucks. Nothing unusual there for a car built in 1910.

David Thompson


vapeurchapelon
 

Hello Dave,
 
the NPRHA has Tahoe-made trucks available which are very close:
 
http://store.nprha.org/ho-scale-nprha-special-edition-40-ton-t-section-andrews-trucks-semi-scale-wheels/
 
Greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 02. Januar 2021 um 20:05 Uhr
Von: "Dave Lawler" <davelawler@...>
An: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Those are rather interesting trucks on that tank car. Anyone know the manufacturer?

 

Dave Lawler

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Dave Parker
 

I agree with what David said -- nothing out of the ordinary for the period.

That said, there must be at least six variations of the early Andrews truck in the 1912 CBC.  Although ASF was the company that marketed them as "Andrews" trucks, there were similar designs from quite a few companies.

The closest visual match in the 1912 Cyc seems to be in Fig 921, but exactly who made it is not stated.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Richard Townsend
 

Kadee has made similar trucks as well.


Tony Thompson
 

I call these trucks the "long strap" Andrews, unlike the short-strap version used later, for example under USRA cars. (Referring to the steel strap that attaches to the journal boxes.) The earlier trucks are L-section sideframes too, unlike the later U-section frames. Kadee makes an L-section long-strap Andrews.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Dave Parker
 

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 01:05 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
I call these trucks the "long strap" Andrews, unlike the short-strap version used later, for example under USRA cars. (Referring to the steel strap that attaches to the journal boxes.) The earlier trucks are L-section sideframes too, unlike the later U-section frames. Kadee makes an L-section long-strap Andrews.
While there is nothing wrong withe the descriptors "long start" and "short strap", I am not aware of any real basis for saying that one came earlier than the other.  The earliest evidence that I can find for what we would all probably call an Andrews truck can be found in two patents from late in 1906; the granting dates are all of two weeks apart.  US 838319 was awarded to J. Green on behalf of the short-lived Andrews & Co, and had the short strap.  US 837047 was awarded to a Mr Floyd on behalf of ASF, and had the long.  BTW, both had T-section frames, not L-section (if I am reading the drawings correctly).

By the time we get to the 1912 CBC, I count eight truck designs that are Andrews-like.  They seem to show a mix of long and short (and maybe one medium?) tie-bars.  They also have a mix of T- and L-section frames, but two have what I am tempted to call a hybrid design where the top chord is a U-section.  I have seen some examples of these "mixed chord type" trucks in prototype photos.

Last factoid:  The ASF drawing of their Vulcan truck calls it an Andrews without tie-bars.  The marketing as a Vulcan truck first appears in the 1916 edition of the CBC.
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Tony Thompson
 

I  wrote:
I call these trucks the "long strap" Andrews, unlike the short-strap version used later, for example under USRA cars. (Referring to the steel strap that attaches to the journal boxes.) The earlier trucks are L-section sideframes too, unlike the later U-section frames. Kadee makes an L-section long-strap Andrews.
Dave Parker replied:

While there is nothing wrong withe the descriptors "long start" and "short strap", I am not aware of any real basis for saying that one came earlier than the other.  

     I agree, Dave. I didn't mean to suggest that the strap length defines time of use. I just meant that the USRA cars with Andrews trucks were substantially later than the first Andrews trucks. Obviously I wasn't clear.

Tony Thompson