Photo: Unloading A Fire Tuck


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading A Fire Tuck

Photos from the Walla Walla Project blog:

https://tinyurl.com/3p9848f2

https://tinyurl.com/xd2hj65c

https://tinyurl.com/u4ardmpa

Description:

“New fire truck for the City unloaded from Union Pacific railroad boxcar, July 10th 1961.”

Grand Truck Western end-door boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
It seems to me that the end result of this process was to move the fire truck from one STMFC to another STMFC!
 
Not sure I understand what is being done exactly
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 12:44 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading A Fire Tuck

Photo: Unloading A Fire Tuck

Photos from the Walla Walla Project blog:

https://tinyurl.com/3p9848f2

https://tinyurl.com/xd2hj65c

https://tinyurl.com/u4ardmpa

Description:

“New fire truck for the City unloaded from Union Pacific railroad boxcar, July 10th 1961.”

Grand Truck Western end-door boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

I suspect they don't have a end-of-track ramp, so drove it out on a flatcar then maneuvered it onto a side loading platform, which were much more common in small towns.

Dennis Storzek


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Got it, thanks Dennis!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 2:18 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading A Fire Tuck

I suspect they don't have a end-of-track ramp, so drove it out on a flatcar then maneuvered it onto a side loading platform, which were much more common in small towns.

Dennis Storzek


Andy Laurent
 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 11:18 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
I suspect they don't have a end-of-track ramp, so drove it out on a flatcar then maneuvered it onto a side loading platform, which were much more common in small towns.

Dennis Storzek
...or they needed a flatcar to get the truck onto the ground via an end-unloading ramp. This was also fairly common in fire-apparatus unloading. The sharp angle of declination for most end ramps could have lead the end overhanging parts of the truck to strike the underside of the boxcar roof. I model this on my HO scale layout...fire truck loads need to have an "idler" flatcar spotted between them and the ramp.

Andy L.
Madison WI


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 09:44 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
https://tinyurl.com/u4ardmpa
Andy,

Doesn't look to be the case here, but I can certainly see it with other apparatus.

Dennis Storzek


brianleppert@att.net
 

That flat car does not have an ordinary deck.  Its thicker and covers over the stack pockets.  The car must be in special service.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 03:12 PM, brianleppert@... wrote:
That flat car does not have an ordinary deck.  Its thicker and covers over the stack pockets.  The car must b
I don't think that's a deck, but rather rub rails, possibly made of old rail. I kinda figured it was an early piggyback car.

Dennis Storzek 


brianleppert@att.net
 

Dennis, I think you're right.  So for what I wrote, "never mind".

Brian


Clarence Zink
 

I've got to agree with Andy Laurent that the flat car is being used as an "end loading ramp".

Notice the end of the flatcar up against the boxcar seems to be supported by blocking, to elevate that end almost to the level of the boxcar the truck is coming out of.  And it appears that even with the receiving end of the flat car elevated by blocking, it is still 6 or 8 inches lower than the floor of the boxcar.

Since we cannot see the left (discharge) end of the flat car, who knows what is actually happening?  Gives us "modeling license" to do whatever we think is appropriate.  IF somebody can figure exactly what the Walla Walla facility consisted of, then it can be modeled accurately.

CRZ


David Payne
 

 
The fellow to the right seems to be watching intently; could it be loading instead?
DPayne
 
 


Guy Wilber
 

David Payne wrote:

“The fellow to the right seems to be watching intently; could it be loading instead?”

David,

If you look closely at the photo showing the fire truck still in the car you can see that they are fueling it.  Standard practice for any vehicle was to have the fuel tank empty for transport.  The truck is being unloaded at it’s destination.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada