Photo: Unloading Grain


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/6696/rec/31

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Douglas Harding
 

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/6696/rec/31

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


mel perry
 

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/6696/rec/31

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Douglas Harding
 

True there were grain un-loaders as Dan describes. Photos attached. Usually installed are very large terminal grain ports, where time was crucial, ie to load a waiting ship. Or where a large number of cars were handled every day, ie a large flour mill. Because of the expense and complexity these un-loaders were not found at the local feed mill or grain elevator.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:58 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

 

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

 

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

 

Dan Mitchell

==========



On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

 

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were

required and how long it took to

manually unload a boxcar loaded with

grain?

thanks

mel perry

 

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 

 

 


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

What I said. Unloading grain (or other) filled boxcars by hand was slow, labor intensive, and expensive. Obviously expensive enough for big operations to purchase these elaborate machines to speed up the process.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 28, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

True there were grain un-loaders as Dan describes. Photos attached. Usually installed are very large terminal grain ports, where time was crucial, ie to load a waiting ship. Or where a large number of cars were handled every day, ie a large flour mill. Because of the expense and complexity these un-loaders were not found at the local feed mill or grain elevator.
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:58 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain
 
Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.
 
It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.
 
One of these things would make a fabulous model.
 
Dan Mitchell
==========


On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
 
out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry
 
On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:
Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes. 
 
Doug Harding
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain
 
Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
 
 
 

<GN grain unloading lightened.jpg><GN grain unloading2 lighhtened.jpg><GN grain unloading3 lightened.jpg>


Clarence Zink
 

Tilting boxcars to unload grain reminds me of the Jay's Potato Chip factory on the south side of Chicago in the late 1950's.  My family would drive by there on occasion, and there were usually one or two 18 wheel trailer trucks tilted way up in the air, unloading potatoes.  Made a lasting impression on a 9 year old!

CRZ


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

The GN, and other roads, had huge high-sided woodchip gondolas with end-doors. These were emptied by tipping whole car nearly vertical on a hydraulically-inclined section of track. The same idea is also used with large truck-trailers as you describe.

Even more extreme are the mechanical coal-dumpers used in many port cities, both on the ocean and in the Great Lakes. The entire car (sometimes a pair of cars) is grabbed, clamped, then raised perhaps 50 feet. Sometimes the car is elevated by pushing it up a ramp, and sometimes lifted with a vertical elevator. Then it is nearly inverted to dump the load. Quite rapid, very dusty, and very impressive. 

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 29, 2021, at 3:14 PM, Clarence Zink <clarence.zink@...> wrote:

Tilting boxcars to unload grain reminds me of the Jay's Potato Chip factory on the south side of Chicago in the late 1950's.  My family would drive by there on occasion, and there were usually one or two 18 wheel trailer trucks tilted way up in the air, unloading potatoes.  Made a lasting impression on a 9 year old!

CRZ


Clarence Zink
 

Mechanical car dumpers like these.  Photos from the Library of Congress Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information digital collection.  Photos are captioned: PRR Coal Loader Sandusky Oh 1943
CRZ


Clarence Zink
 

Well, it sure isn't "unloading grain", but these photos of loading boxcars with coal from the Utah State Historical Society ought to be of interest also. 

Back in 1916, the Standard Fuel Company of Utah used "car tippers" to load coal into boxcars at the minesite:


CRZ


mel perry
 

Oh that had to be a s**t job unloadinrg
one of those
;-(
mel perry


On Fri, Apr 30, 2021, 2:58 PM Clarence Zink <clarence.zink@...> wrote:
Well, it sure isn't "unloading grain", but these photos of loading boxcars with coal from the Utah State Historical Society ought to be of interest also. 

Back in 1916, the Standard Fuel Company of Utah used "car tippers" to load coal into boxcars at the minesite:


CRZ


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

I suppose they could use the same type “car tipper” to unload as they do for grain. That, however, would only apply for large-scale users. The far more common “little guys” would have to do it the hard way, by hand. But perhaps not much worse than shoveling it out of a gondola, which was the normal way. Such nasty work was very common "back then"… take a look at the incredible mess involved in “coaling” a steamship. Filling the bunkers was usually accomplished using wheelbarrows and either buckets or cloth sacks filled with coal. The black dust got everywhere … the ship and the crewmen were covered in it.

The “good old days” were not nearly so nice as folks want to remember, or nowadays imagine.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 30, 2021, at 8:12 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

Oh that had to be a s**t job unloadinrg
one of those
;-(
mel perry


On Fri, Apr 30, 2021, 2:58 PM Clarence Zink <clarence.zink@...> wrote:
Well, it sure isn't "unloading grain", but these photos of loading boxcars with coal from the Utah State Historical Society ought to be of interest also. 

Back in 1916, the Standard Fuel Company of Utah used "car tippers" to load coal into boxcars at the minesite:
<StdFuelCo loading boxcar @ tipple 1916c.jpg><StdFuelCo loading boxcar @ tipple 1916b.jpg><StdFuelCo loading boxcar @ tipple 1916.jpg>

CRZ




Philip Dove
 

In 1997 I was in Thunder bay Canada standing on one of the docks. The other side of the water was a row of rail served silos and covered hopper cars were unloading I was very surprised it seemed to be taking about 5 minutes to unload a car measuring about 50' long, It would seem there is no really fast way of unloading grain even now. Are there any dangers connected with a build up of static electricity if all the grain pours out  rapidly in one direction? 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Wed, 28 Apr 2021 at 13:57, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:
Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA