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Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

A 1932 photo from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture:

https://ferrisarchives.northwestmuseum.org/Item/Index/26672

OK. I know some of you are thinking these plumbing fixtures look like tires, but read the sign. These must be very large faucet washers.

Seriously, were there any regulations about removing placards that were no longer needed?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Lee
 

Mmm, great photo but the guy is offloading tires stacked in a box car... 


Lee

On Sunday, June 14, 2020, 12:16, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

A 1932 photo from the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture:

https://ferrisarchives.northwestmuseum.org/Item/Index/26672

OK. I know some of you are thinking these plumbing fixtures look like tires, but read the sign. These must be very large faucet washers.

Seriously, were there any regulations about removing placards that were no longer needed?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Seriously, were there any regulations about removing placards that were no longer needed?

    A former railroad clerk I talked to about route cards and placards, when asked if the old ones were removed before adding new ones, replied "Why? Just tack 'em on top." Photos do exist of placards partly ripped off, likely "disabling" them without taking time to cleanly remove them.

Tony Thompson



erieblt2
 

Good eye! I think removing the placard without a ladder(or being at a loading dock)would be tough! Placard boards in photos often seem to have kept their paint more than I saw in real life. Bill S

On Jun 14, 2020, at 11:05 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Bob Chaparro wrote:

Seriously, were there any regulations about removing placards that were no longer needed?

    A former railroad clerk I talked to about route cards and placards, when asked if the old ones were removed before adding new ones, replied "Why? Just tack 'em on top." Photos do exist of placards partly ripped off, likely "disabling" them without taking time to cleanly remove them.

Tony Thompson



Mont Switzer
 

Bob and Tony,

 

I doubt the display portion of hazardous materials placarding regulations have changed all that much over the years.  You could get away with covering a hazardous placard over, but if no covering is available, "when the freight comes off the placard comes off" unless it is a tank car or a car with containers that have residue in them.

 

As we all know, railroads began lowering placard (tack) boards in the mid-1950's so you didn't need to be at a dock or have a ladder to install the placards.

 

Mont Switzer   


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of erieblt2 [williamfsmith22@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 2:33 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Plumbing Fixtures

Good eye! I think removing the placard without a ladder(or being at a loading dock)would be tough! Placard boards in photos often seem to have kept their paint more than I saw in real life. Bill S

On Jun 14, 2020, at 11:05 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Bob Chaparro wrote:

Seriously, were there any regulations about removing placards that were no longer needed?

    A former railroad clerk I talked to about route cards and placards, when asked if the old ones were removed before adding new ones, replied "Why? Just tack 'em on top." Photos do exist of placards partly ripped off, likely "disabling" them without taking time to cleanly remove them.

Tony Thompson



Tony Thompson
 

Mont Switzer wrote:

I doubt the display portion of hazardous materials placarding regulations have changed all that much over the years.  You could get away with covering a hazardous placard over, but if no covering is available, "when the freight comes off the placard comes off" unless it is a tank car or a car with containers that have residue in them.

   I am sure this is true for hazardous placards, but I was thinking of the many OTHER placards that are used, from "unload other side" and "canned goods" or "frozen food," to "caution - auto parts."

Tony Thompson