Photo: Unloading Something From A Boxcar


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading Something From A Boxcar

Photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:

https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Image/IM94069

I believe the description for this photo is incorrect.

What I see are bags of some dry material being unloaded and mixed in the rear of the truck.

I also see what may be a scale near the boxcar door, possibly for weighing the material in the bags.

I’m guessing here.

What do other see?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 09:56 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:

I believe the description for this photo is incorrect.

What I see are bags of some dry material being unloaded and mixed in the rear of the truck.

I also see what may be a scale near the boxcar door, possibly for weighing the material in the bags.

I’m guessing here.

What do other see?


The "industrial tractor" looks to me like the small batch trucks paving contractors used on highway projects back around WWI. It doesn't need headlights 'cause they don't work after dark. These trucks were loaded with measured amounts of stone, sand, and Portland cement then driven to the mixing machine to be mixed right where it was to be poured. Years ago SS Ltd. made a good model of the batch mixer in HO. I always thought that the cement was just measured by the bag, but perhaps in this case the bags are inconsistent, or someone is just being a stickler for detail.

Some good photos of early highway paving on this web site:
https://www.matichcorp.com/project-gallery/highways/

Dennis Storzek


Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

I have a few different interpretations:

1) the bag hanging from the roof is a balance for a drop gate to access the bed of the truck.
2) the material in the dump cart, being dumped in the truck, is loose material being transferred from the boxcar.
3) the material on the ground that looks like bags is likely a paper door liner to keep whatever is loose in the car clean and uncomtaminatd.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 11:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Something From A Boxcar
 

Photo: Unloading Something From A Boxcar

Photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:

https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Image/IM94069

I believe the description for this photo is incorrect.

What I see are bags of some dry material being unloaded and mixed in the rear of the truck.

I also see what may be a scale near the boxcar door, possibly for weighing the material in the bags.

I’m guessing here.

What do other see?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

I agree with Bruce on all counts, but I still think this is at some major paving project where the scale is being used to accurately measure bulk Portland cement into batch trucks. Otherwise, why not just fill the truck and run the whole truck across a scale? This is certainly a project of long enough duration to make it worth building the platforms ( on both sides of the driveway, no less) and installing the scale.

Dennis Storzek


Jeff Ford
 

The fella in the door of the car is holding a scoop.  That suggests the contents of the car are loose, hence the dump cart and scale.  This was still the era of manual unloading for bulk products shipped in boxcars (think grain). Still not sure about the crumpled whatzit on the ground. 

$0.02,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, Texas


Clarence Zink
 

I'd agree with Dennis.  Using his link to the Matich Corp website, and clicking on the photo "first paver" (second row, far right picture) shows a dump truck with a three compartment bed, probably similar to what is being loaded at the boxcar:


Makes sense that the compartments contain sand, aggregate, and portland cement, any of which, or all, could be unloaded from the boxcar.  Portland was probably in bags, but the sand and aggregate would not need "protection", and could have been loaded and unloaded "loose'.

CRZ


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, May 8, 2021 at 11:43 AM, Clarence Zink wrote:
Makes sense that the compartments contain sand, aggregate, and portland cement, any of which, or all, could be unloaded from the boxcar.  Portland was probably in bags, but the sand and aggregate would not need "protection", and could have been loaded and unloaded "loose'.
The scale at the boxcar tells me it's cement. The sand and aggregate are much greater in volume is concrete and can just be proportioned by volume, but the cement was typically done by counting the bags, which was effectively by weight. If the contractor was buying bulk cement, he needed to weigh it out, thus the scale.

Dennis Storzek