PLASTIC CEMENTS


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I rarely work with plastic models, however, recently I have had the occasion to work on two plastic structure kits.  One is a Wlathers kit and the other a Grandt Line.
I thought that the least of my worries would be bonding the components. I have tried Testors liquid cement and Lester Bruer’s favorite MEK.  Neither forms an instant
 bond. I am wondering if the product loses its potency over time. I have not tried the new Tenex.

This seems to be a trivial question but I have spoken with several modelers recently who have had the same experience.

Any thoughts?

Bill Pardie
M]

_._,_._,_


Scott H. Haycock
 

Hi, Bill
 
I don't know of any 'instant' way to bond styrene- even ACC takes a few seconds. I use MEK. It's as fast as anything else I know about.

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 06/01/2021 12:04 PM WILLIAM PARDIE <pardiew001@...> wrote:
 
 
I rarely work with plastic models, however, recently I have had the occasion to work on two plastic structure kits.  One is a Wlathers kit and the other a Grandt Line.
I thought that the least of my worries would be bonding the components. I have tried Testors liquid cement and Lester Bruer’s favorite MEK.  Neither forms an instant
 bond. I am wondering if the product loses its potency over time. I have not tried the new Tenex.
 
This seems to be a trivial question but I have spoken with several modelers recently who have had the same experience.
 
Any thoughts?
 
Bill Pardie
M]


Brian Carlson
 

I’ll agree with Scott. MEK is the fastest but it flashes quickly and the parts need to be in contact prior to application. Testor’s is slow working. Use it only in areas where you need more working time. 

I use the scalecoat plastic cement now when building styrene freight car kits. 

Not familiar with the new tenex. Used to love it. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jun 1, 2021, at 2:20 PM, Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...> wrote:


Hi, Bill
 
I don't know of any 'instant' way to bond styrene- even ACC takes a few seconds. I use MEK. It's as fast as anything else I know about.

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 06/01/2021 12:04 PM WILLIAM PARDIE <pardiew001@...> wrote:
 
 
I rarely work with plastic models, however, recently I have had the occasion to work on two plastic structure kits.  One is a Wlathers kit and the other a Grandt Line.
I thought that the least of my worries would be bonding the components. I have tried Testors liquid cement and Lester Bruer’s favorite MEK.  Neither forms an instant
 bond. I am wondering if the product loses its potency over time. I have not tried the new Tenex.
 
This seems to be a trivial question but I have spoken with several modelers recently who have had the same experience.
 
Any thoughts?
 
Bill Pardie
M]


Scott
 

Try some Tamiya thin cement.  Good stuff.

Scott.McDonald


John Sykes III
 

I use technical grade methylene chloride for very fast bonding and MEK when I need a few seconds of working time.  Methylene chloride was the original ingredient in Tenax 7R and MicroWeld before they converted to "non-hazardous" ingredients.  Non-hazardous is a joke, these ingredients are less hazardous than the old ingredients, but are definitely not 100% non-hazardous.  Methylene chloride works well on some plastics that are hard to weld with other cements (ABS).  For delrin and similar plastics I use a two step process with Loctite 770 surface prep and Loctite 401 CA.

-- John


Jerry Michels
 

MEK doesn't lose potency. I have a half gallon that is at least 20 years old and it still works quite well. I pour from the larger can into a small glass bottle with a brush attached to the lid. The only thing I can think of is that water got into the MEK, perhaps humidity?  Jerry Michels


Philip Dove
 

I have tried using Mek and Mek pak (the leading UK brand of "safe" methyl ethyl ketone) l find l work too slowly for either to work for me, they flash off before l get my brush to the work. Everyone else l know gets on fine with both. 
Don't smoke or have any strong heat sources around when using Methyl ethyl ketone as it can be turned into some kind of fumes that put you into hospital. On the other hand it is also highly inflamable

Sent from my Huawei phone


John Mateyko
 

I have used(with good results) Aleene's.  I buy the smaller bottle as it will dry out over the years.  There is no strength to this product so it should not be used for 'pulling' surfaces.  However, it takes about five minutes to set so I have a few minutes to get things right.  It is also water soluble so a building assembled two years ago may be placed in water for a few minutes and taken apart.  It shows white while drying and within twenty-four hours is clear if you don't get off all the excess.  John Mateyko


John Sykes III
 

Aleene's Tacky Glue has a long and storied past.  Originally designed by 3M to glue blue foam insulation to plywood, it lost out in favor of tube-loaded products, such as Liquid Nails.  3M sold the rights for the product to the company that sells it as Aleene's Tacky Glue.  It works very well for gluing blue foam layers together for scenery, but I would not recommend it for gluing plastics like styrene since it is a surface adhesive and does not weld the parts together.  It needs a semi-porous surface to get a really good bond.  It will come loose from a non-porous surface as soon as it dries completely (learned that the hard way).  Other PVA glues, such as Pacer's Canopy Cement or MicroScale Kristal-Klear, are designed to remain flexible when dry and dries clear - making them perfect for gluing windows into structures or vehicles (and can be used to create small windows where acetate is not an option).


Armand Premo
 

don valentine

On Sunday, June 6, 2021, 08:58:40 AM EDT, John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:


Aleene's Tacky Glue has a long and storied past.  Originally designed by 3M to glue blue foam insulation to plywood, it lost out in favor of tube-loaded products, such as Liquid Nails.  3M sold the rights for the product to the company that sells it as Aleene's Tacky Glue.  It works very well for gluing blue foam layers together for scenery, but I would not recommend it for gluing plastics like styrene since it is a surface adhesive and does not weld the parts together.  It needs a semi-porous surface to get a really good bond.  It will come loose from a non-porous surface as soon as it dries completely (learned that the hard way).  Other PVA glues, such as Pacer's Canopy Cement or MicroScale Kristal-Klear, are designed to remain flexible when dry and dries clear - making them perfect for gluing windows into structures or vehicles (and can be used to create small windows where acetate is not an option).


Randy Hammill
 

I use Aleene’s for a lot. Gluing down my track, for example. It is a bit flexible when dried, I use it for gluing etched running boards on plastic models.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Randy Hammill
 

I’ve been using Styrene Tack-it II

https://www.amazon.com/Tenax-Styrene-II-Single-Ounce-Bottles/dp/B07NCC2FDG/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=styrene+tack-it+ii&qid=1622995629&sprefix=styrene+tack&sr=8-3

Supposedly it’s a reverse engineered Tenax 7R made better. It works well, which is all I really care about.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Randy, my Tenax seemed to evaporate regardless of how tightly I screwed on the top.  Does this do that?

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Randy Hammill
Sent: Sunday, June 06, 2021 12:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PLASTIC CEMENTS

 

I’ve been using Styrene Tack-it II

https://www.amazon.com/Tenax-Styrene-II-Single-Ounce-Bottles/dp/B07NCC2FDG/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=styrene+tack-it+ii&qid=1622995629&sprefix=styrene+tack&sr=8-3


Supposedly it’s a reverse engineered Tenax 7R made better. It works well, which is all I really care about.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com