PLE 46145 gon with scrap tin load 1942


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


gary laakso
 

What a great picture!  Thank you very much for sharing.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 2:26 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] PLE 46145 gon with scrap tin load 1942

 

Hi List Members,

 

PLE 46145 gon with scrap tin load 1942

 

 

Metadata below

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


Todd Sullivan
 

The load looks to be mostly tin cans - round and flat.  I'm not sure I want to tackle that in HO!

Todd Sullivan


charlie9
 

Just put some Reynold's Wrap in the wife's blender.
Charlie


Eric Hansmann
 

The NYC Lines built 5,000 gondolas in Lots 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336-G in 1916. They were 46-foot, 2-inch interior length with 1018 cubic capacity. The cars were originally built with composite sides and drop ends for mill service. The NYC had 4,000 of these cars with 500 each assigned to the MC and P&LE.

Many were converted to steel sides, such as this one in a 1925 image.

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 11/24/2021 3:26 PM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,

PLE 46145 gon with scrap tin load 1942


Metadata below


Enjoy!

Claus Schlund




nyc3001 .
 

Some of these cars apparently survived up to 1953. It looks like both the wood and steel side versions could be useful for most steam era modelers given their longevity and abundance.

-Phil


Bill Parks
 

On Thu, Nov 25, 2021 at 11:21 AM, charlie9 wrote:
Just put some Reynold's Wrap in the wife's blender.
Charlie - 

I remember an article (I think in MR) 20 years ago, or so, about modeling scrap tin cans, and the author said he used the wrappers from Hershey Kisses, and put them in a blender.  If you get the Christmas ones, then you have not only silver, but also red, green, and some gold to mix in.
 
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Philip Dove
 

Tiny lengths of fat metal rod or slices of the Right gauge of hypodermic needle for tins, then model  oil cans from oblong of strip wood decal led with microscale decals from a gas station set. My HOscale set includes a decal for stacks of Shell gallon oil cans.  When modelling a scrap metal load for a gondola remaber the source of the metal effects the load. Loads from a automobile factory will be mainly scraps of bright steel sheet. Loads from a demolished industrial structure will be girders, ladders, wheels etc. Acarefull y dismantled structure might have scrap girders loaded on a flat car. 


Robert Allan
 

Looks like this car may have been an overload. The scrap on the ground is an attempt to adjust the weight. Scrap dealers were notoriously bad at judging weight in my field days.

Bob Allan
Omaha


Hudson Leighton
 

I think a load of tin can scrap would be hard to overload, lots of air space.

-Hudson


Tony Thompson
 

Yeah, funny how the bad estimates were always on the high side.
Tony Thompson 


On Nov 26, 2021, at 7:57 AM, Robert Allan via groups.io <robert.allan32@...> wrote:

Looks like this car may have been an overload. The scrap on the ground is an attempt to adjust the weight. Scrap dealers were notoriously bad at judging weight in my field days.

Bob Allan
Omaha


leakinmywaders
 

HO scale can load for a PTSX (Proleride Transportation Systems) recycled steel quad hopper. Aluminum foil tops from canned drinks, mainly Sanpellegrino,  and a few other miscellaneous foil sources sliced with scissors into 2-3" strips, rolled between the thumb and fingers, and mass trimmed to roughly 1/16-inch lengths with scissors.  A good mindless modeling activity while watching TV.   Glued with dilute white glue to a black foam core base, dulled with dustings of dark gray and red oxide chalk, affixed with Dullcote.

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT


Tim O'Connor
 


Wow, that is outstanding! I will never toss another aluminum foil top! 😁

Tim O'Connor

On 11/26/2021 7:41 PM, leakinmywaders via groups.io wrote:
HO scale can load for a PTSX (Proleride Transportation Systems) recycled steel quad hopper. Aluminum foil tops from canned drinks, mainly Sanpellegrino,  and a few other miscellaneous foil sources sliced with scissors into 2-3" strips, rolled between the thumb and fingers, and mass trimmed to roughly 1/16-inch lengths with scissors.  A good mindless modeling activity while watching TV.   Glued with dilute white glue to a black foam core base, dulled with dustings of dark gray and red oxide chalk, affixed with Dullcote.

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

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--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts