Plenty of RDG twin and quad hoppers, 1940s


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List members,
 
Plenty of RDG twin and quad hoppers, 1940s
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


William Dale
 

The sad part is nothing remains, but one set of rails.


Todd Sullivan
 

That was an amazing operation, and there was a similar regional breaker at St. Nicholas in the Mahoning Valley.
The business idea was to centralize the anthracite 'refining' operations at two regional mega-breakers instead of having lots of smaller breakers.  It also probably improved the financials of smaller mining operations, since they could relyon Reading's breakers to process their coal instead of having to invest in their own. 

I walked all over the St. Nicholas breaker area a couple of times in the early 2000s, well after it had closed.  The breaker sat in a shallow creek valley, and the raw coal arrived in a yard at the bottom, then was hauled up to the top of the complex where each carload was inspected and dumped.  The raw anthracite was conveyed to the top of the breaker whcih was about 4-5 stories tall, then it was crushed, washed and sorted by size and reloaded in empty hoppers.  There was a thawing shed, probably of the same design as Locust Summit's.  Loaded cars were dropped down to a scale, weighed, then switched into trains destined for customers.  I found some weigh records from the late 1960s in the old office that showed that almost all carloads were going to export via the Readings facility at Port Richmond in Philadelphia.  The entire breaker could have been a model railroad in itself, especially if the era was set in the 1940s.

Todd Sullivan