Topics

PRR R-60 express reefer


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

I have just acquired a "Railworks Ltd" PRR R-60 express reefer. I
figured I could use it in a mail train or similar but would like some
information. Period of it's use and would it likely show up on a Santa Fe
mail train?
This is a partial crosspost, sorry if it has been read twice. It is a
freight car (reefer) and a passenger car of sorts (express).

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax DCC owner, Chief system
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Richard Hendrickson
 

I have just acquired a "Railworks Ltd" PRR R-60 express reefer. I
figured I could use it in a mail train or similar but would like some
information. Period of it's use and would it likely show up on a Santa Fe
mail train?
One of the SPFs will have to give you the details on the R-60s, John, but
Pennsy express reefers were common in the consists of the Fast Mail and
Grand Canyon. See, for example, Duke & Kistler p. 108; the second car
behind the locomotive is a steel PRR express reefer.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D. <smithbf@...>
 

John Miller asks:

I have just acquired a "Railworks Ltd" PRR R-60 express reefer. I
figured I could use it in a mail train or similar but would like some
information. Period of it's use and would it likely show up on a Santa Fe
mail train?
This is a partial crosspost, sorry if it has been read twice. It is a
freight car (reefer) and a passenger car of sorts (express).
John,

The R-60 reefer was a relatively rare bird - I don't have the exact number
on hand, but the class numbered around 30 when built (early 1900s). By the
transition era, only a few were left in service. It is an interesting car
as it had some unique features, such as a central corridor (where the doors
are) with two seperate refrigerated sections. A far more common sight
would have been the R-50 express reefer, which numbered in the thousands.
Hopefully, we will see a resin R-50 in the very near future (the scuttlebut
says so...).

As Richard noted, photos of PRR express reefers have documented travel all
over the continent, so the possibility does exist that an R-60 would show
up on the Santa Fe, however, the later in the steam era, the less likely,
and the R-60 was usually assigned to a specific service rather than roaming
where needed.

Having said all this, I too have the Railworks R-60 (nice model) and even
though I model PRR, that particular reefer will not show up too often on my
layout...even in 1944 its a bit of an oddball.

Happy Rails
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D.
Scott-Ritchey Research Center
334-844-5587, 334-844-5850 (fax)
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ____________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|____________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D. <smithbf@...>
 

such as a central corridor (where the doors are) with two seperate
refrigerated sections<
I too have the Railworks R-60 (nice model)<
Bruce,
As you know the model has windows on the doors. The one picture from
Steve Sandifer site seems to show the car with no windows, just inset panels
at the top of the doors. As it is a reefer can I assume it had no windows
or are they just really dirty?
Jon,

What's the URL of Steve's site? The car diagram from Waynor's (spelling?)
book has square windows in the doors. I think that there is a photo or two
of an R60 in Pennsy Power 3 as well, and as I recall, the windows were
present. Some may have been plated over, but I think dirt is more likely
the culprit. I'm also pretty sure that they never received porthole
windows.

I know, the concept of a reefer with windows is a bit odd...but that is
correct for the R-60! It led me to wonder why they were there? During
loading, you would get light through the open door - no need for windows -
or perhaps this allow light in from the closed door side?...did someone
ride there?

Happy Rails
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D.
Scott-Ritchey Research Center
334-844-5587, 334-844-5850 (fax)
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ____________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|____________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Bob Johnson <bobjohnson@...>
 

John, Bruce and list,

Following are the quantities of PRR express reefers for several dates:

Class built 1-1-47 1-1-50 1-1-55 1-1-60 1-1-67 1-1-68
R50 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
R50a 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
R50b 550 547 546 412 154 6 0
R60 36 33 16 2 0 0 0

Bob Johnson

"Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D." wrote:

The R-60 reefer was a relatively rare bird - I don't have the exact number
on hand, but the class numbered around 30 when built (early 1900s). By the
transition era, only a few were left in service. It is an interesting car
as it had some unique features, such as a central corridor (where the doors
are) with two seperate refrigerated sections. A far more common sight
would have been the R-50 express reefer, which numbered in the thousands.
Hopefully, we will see a resin R-50 in the very near future (the scuttlebut
says so...).

As Richard noted, photos of PRR express reefers have documented travel all
over the continent, so the possibility does exist that an R-60 would show
up on the Santa Fe, however, the later in the steam era, the less likely,
and the R-60 was usually assigned to a specific service rather than roaming
where needed.

Having said all this, I too have the Railworks R-60 (nice model) and even
though I model PRR, that particular reefer will not show up too often on my
layout...even in 1944 its a bit of an oddball.