Pulpwood, Wood Chips: Uses other than Paper?


Scott H. Haycock
 

Folks,

The recent photos of pulpwood unloading has spurred a question. In the 1950s, were there any other uses for pulpwood and wood chips aside from paper manufacturing? I have some freight car projects for these type of cars, but no longer model a main line with through trains. I don't have room for a paper mill, so I'm looking for another, smaller industry that may have used these cars s a destination.

Thanks,
Scott Haycock


erick johnson
 

I remember clearly when our snow tires had bits of wood chips embedded in the rubber (I am pretty old).  Seems the rubber wore faster than the wood chips, and little wood chips would be sticking out of the surface of the tire. I would love to find one of those old tires for "show and tell". How about a tire retreading/recapping place?  A little brick building "Clem's Capping"


On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 12:48 PM Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...> wrote:
Folks,

The recent photos of pulpwood unloading has spurred a question. In the 1950s, were there any other uses for pulpwood and wood chips aside from paper manufacturing? I have some freight car projects for these type of cars, but no longer model a main line with through trains. I don't have room for a paper mill, so I'm looking for another, smaller industry that may have used these cars s a destination.

Thanks,
Scott Haycock


O Fenton Wells
 

Scott park one at your depot or team track that’s where many of them were loaded then it can go to an off site paper mill
Fenton 


On Aug 3, 2022, at 4:03 PM, erick johnson <jejhnsn@...> wrote:


I remember clearly when our snow tires had bits of wood chips embedded in the rubber (I am pretty old).  Seems the rubber wore faster than the wood chips, and little wood chips would be sticking out of the surface of the tire. I would love to find one of those old tires for "show and tell". How about a tire retreading/recapping place?  A little brick building "Clem's Capping"

On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 12:48 PM Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...> wrote:
Folks,

The recent photos of pulpwood unloading has spurred a question. In the 1950s, were there any other uses for pulpwood and wood chips aside from paper manufacturing? I have some freight car projects for these type of cars, but no longer model a main line with through trains. I don't have room for a paper mill, so I'm looking for another, smaller industry that may have used these cars s a destination.

Thanks,
Scott Haycock


erick johnson
 

We called them "sawdust tires"


Scott H. Haycock
 

 
erick johnson wrote:


How about a tire retreading/recapping place?  A little brick building "Clem's Capping"

I did a little research online and found out that the recapping rubber was impregnated with the sawdust so such railroad cars would go to a rubber factory, not a recapping shop.

Attached is a short description of how these tires worked- Suction!

Scott Haycock 


Scott H. Haycock
 


O Fenton Wells wrote:


Scott park one at your depot or team track that’s where many of them were loaded then it can go to an off site paper mill

That would work for pulpwood racks, but what about woodchip hoppers? I've got a photo of a beautiful(?) three bay hopper with wood extensions I'm dying to build, but these cars were loaded at sawmills- another industry too big for my railroad.

Scott Haycock


Jeff Helm
 

Scott,

What about only modeling the woodchip loader on your layout?  These often were away from the main lumber mill buildings with a pneumatic conveying pipe to the loader.  The mill could be “off stage” with just the pipe coming through the trees, as I have seen in The NW, at least.  It is possible that a large furniture maker might also have a woodchip loader for waste sawdust.
--
Cheers

Jeff Helm
The Olympic Peninsula Branch
https://olympicpeninsulabranch.blogspot.com/


Scott H. Haycock
 


Jeff Helm wrote:


Scott,

What about only modeling the woodchip loader on your layout?  These often were away from the main lumber mill buildings with a pneumatic conveying pipe to the loader.  The mill could be “off stage” with just the pipe coming through the trees, as I have seen in The NW, at least.  It is possible that a large furniture maker might also have a woodchip loader for waste sawdust.

Hi Jeff,

I've thought about a chip loader, but it seems to me that a sawmill would need more rail service than just a chip loader. For instance lumber loading.

I would also think that a furniture factory large enough to generate carloads of waste would also need more service.

But that may be the way to go...

A spur with a loading dock for a couple of double door furniture box cars with a loader at the end! I don't have room for the factory itself.

Incidentally, if it matters, I model central North Carolina in 1959.

I appreciate the input!
Scott Haycock


Bill Parks
 
Edited

On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 05:53 PM, Scott H. Haycock wrote:
A spur with a loading dock for a couple of double door furniture box cars with a loader at the end! I don't have room for the factory itself.
 
Incidentally, if it matters, I model central North Carolina in 1959.
Building flats are great for this.  Also, there are several companies that make scenic backgrounds that include industries.  You might even be able to combine the two. 

A furniture factory is perfect for your location and era.

You could even simulate a paper mill by modeling just a small yard to serve the mill.  You can even put this at the front of the layout (assuming space) and give the impression that the mill is 'in the aisle".  If that doesn't work, then scenic backgrounds and/or flats could help create the illusion of the mill

 
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Drew Bunn
 

On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 5:53 PM Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...> wrote:
I've thought about a chip loader, but it seems to me that a sawmill would need more rail service than just a chip loader. For instance lumber loading.

I would also think that a furniture factory large enough to generate carloads of waste would also need more service.

But that may be the way to go...

A spur with a loading dock for a couple of double door furniture box cars with a loader at the end! I don't have room for the factory itself.
One of the industries on my future layout is Knight Flooring.
Manufacturer of hardwood flooring for over 100 years, they had two
seperate spurs that could be modelled with building flats using DPM or
Walthers kits.

Pulpwood loads could be delivered to a team track for use by the local
smokehouse for curing any number of foods..
__________________________________
Drew Bunn

drew.r.bunn@...

Cell - (905) 483-0758


Scott H. Haycock
 


Bill Parks wrote:


Building flats are great for this.  Also, there are several companies that make scenic backgrounds that include industries.  You might even be able to combine the two. 


In my case, this industry has to be in the isle of a near-eye level layout, so all I could include is a dock and a loader. But what a great place to display model freight cars for close-up viewing!

Scott Haycock

 


Scott H. Haycock
 


Drew Bunn wrote:
One of the industries on my future layout is Knight Flooring.
Manufacturer of hardwood flooring for over 100 years,

And they're in North Carolina! I'll research them. Thanks!

Scott Haycock


Richard Wilkens
 

Rayon fabric is made from wood pulp. That's why in Washington state we had the logging company Rayonier. They also used the tree for making lumber and other purposes.

Rich Wilkens


Scott H. Haycock
 



My mistake, Drew. I googled Knight Hardwood Flooring' before I saw your Attachment.  They have several locations in HC.

Scott Haycock


Drew Bunn wrote:
One of the industries on my future layout is Knight Flooring.
Manufacturer of hardwood flooring for over 100 years,

And they're in North Carolina! I'll research them. Thanks!

Scott Haycock


Jim Betz
 

Scott,
  Most pulp mills had a small storage area for cars - maybe 15 to 20 - so you could model
that yard and put the entire mill "on the backdrop" ... perhaps even do some selective
compression of the size of the yard (number of tracks wide and/or length of the tracks).
  I've seen brass pulpwood cars selling on eBay for very little money - a bit on the slim
side in terms of details but nonetheless serviceable - especially after adding a few
small details and weathering them.  Pulpwood hauls were short - usually less than a
hundred miles and often less than 50 ... so it fits in with your "no longer model a main
line" ...
                                                                                               - Jim in the PNW


Drew Bunn
 

I think it'll still work for your needs, Scott.
__________________________________
Drew Bunn

drew.r.bunn@...

Cell - (905) 483-0758

On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 6:46 PM Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...> wrote:



My mistake, Drew. I googled Knight Hardwood Flooring' before I saw your Attachment. They have several locations in HC.

Scott Haycock


Drew Bunn wrote:

One of the industries on my future layout is Knight Flooring.

Manufacturer of hardwood flooring for over 100 years,


And they're in North Carolina! I'll research them. Thanks!

Scott Haycock


Tim O'Connor
 

Scott

In Wyoming I observed a loading track for woodchips at a sawmill. There was an overhead
bin, and the car was tied off between two winches on the ground, and they moved it slowly back
and forth under the bin. The bin was fed by an overhead pipe on lightweight 'trestle' legs that
went back to the sawmill, which was hundreds of feet away ! Saratoga comes to mind as the
name of the place, in southern Wyoming west of Laramie. It required no supervision once it
was set up -- It probably took a few hours to load each car, and they'd come out and reset
it with another empty.

Diamond Scale, I believe, made a kit for such an overhead bin. :-)


That would work for pulpwood racks, but what about woodchip hoppers? I've got a photo of a beautiful(?) three bay hopper with wood extensions I'm dying to build, but these cars were loaded at sawmills- another industry too big for my railroad.

Scott Haycock


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Also, the ground all over the place was covered ankle deep in wood chips.

On 8/3/2022 7:42 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Scott

In Wyoming I observed a loading track for woodchips at a sawmill. There was an overhead
bin, and the car was tied off between two winches on the ground, and they moved it slowly back
and forth under the bin. The bin was fed by an overhead pipe on lightweight 'trestle' legs that
went back to the sawmill, which was hundreds of feet away ! Saratoga comes to mind as the
name of the place, in southern Wyoming west of Laramie. It required no supervision once it
was set up -- It probably took a few hours to load each car, and they'd come out and reset
it with another empty.

Diamond Scale, I believe, made a kit for such an overhead bin. :-)


That would work for pulpwood racks, but what about woodchip hoppers? I've got a photo of a beautiful(?) three bay hopper with wood extensions I'm dying to build, but these cars were loaded at sawmills- another industry too big for my railroad.

Scott Haycock


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Until the late 1950's "wood chips" were called "hog fuel" and would be burned as fuel in furnaces
although many sawmills simply burned them outright ! ( Those giant cone shaped burners. ) The
Southern Pacific had a sizable fleet of "hog fuel" cars rebuilt from de-roofed box cars. Hog fuel
wasn't necessarily chips, either -- it could be chunks of discarded wood and shredded bark.

Tim O'Connor


On 8/3/2022 3:48 PM, Scott H. Haycock wrote:
Folks,

The recent photos of pulpwood unloading has spurred a question. In the 1950s, were there any other uses for pulpwood and wood chips aside from paper manufacturing? I have some freight car projects for these type of cars, but no longer model a main line with through trains. I don't have room for a paper mill, so I'm looking for another, smaller industry that may have used these cars s a destination.

Thanks,
Scott Haycock

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Craig Zeni
 

And in Scott's 1959 rayon and viscose fiber plants were still in production - Celanese at Narrows, VA and North American Rayon at Elizabethton TN were still active. I think Dupont in Waynesboro VA was also a rayon plant.  Rayon and viscose fiber production needs two things in quantity - water and cellulose.