Topics

Rapido GLa Hopper--Anthracite carloads on Great Northern


gary laakso
 

The Annual Report for GN in 1939 shows carloads by these groups:

  1. Anthracite       1.055
  2. Bituminous    39,248
  3. Lignite             12,730 and
  4. Coke                  4,561

 

For a little perspective,  GN move 1,150 carloads of eggs, 1,301 of salt and 537 of wool.  If the GLa hoppers could have moved anthracite, I can buy one.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Robert kirkham
 

That’s the kind of data that had me asking about other speciality products - besides anthracite loads.  

The truth is, I can’t recall more than a handful of hoppers in photos for my era out here in Vancouver.  Maybe they were all on trains running after dark, lol?

Rob  

On Dec 25, 2020, at 8:30 PM, gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

The Annual Report for GN in 1939 shows carloads by these groups:
  1. Anthracite       1.055
  2. Bituminous    39,248 
  3. Lignite             12,730 and
  4. Coke                  4,561
 
For a little perspective,  GN move 1,150 carloads of eggs, 1,301 of salt and 537 of wool.  If the GLa hoppers could have moved anthracite, I can buy one.
 
Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


Gavin
 

Coal usually went out of North Vancouver or Burnaby iirc


On Fri, Dec 25, 2020, 8:55 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:
That’s the kind of data that had me asking about other speciality products - besides anthracite loads.  

The truth is, I can’t recall more than a handful of hoppers in photos for my era out here in Vancouver.  Maybe they were all on trains running after dark, lol?

Rob  

On Dec 25, 2020, at 8:30 PM, gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

The Annual Report for GN in 1939 shows carloads by these groups:
  1. Anthracite       1.055
  2. Bituminous    39,248 
  3. Lignite             12,730 and
  4. Coke                  4,561
 
For a little perspective,  GN move 1,150 carloads of eggs, 1,301 of salt and 537 of wool.  If the GLa hoppers could have moved anthracite, I can buy one.
 
Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


mrvant@rogers.com
 

A lot of western coal was shipped in boxcars on CP. Prairie towns had coal merchants’ bins with the trackside loading bins even with a boxcar floor and the coal was shovelled into them. OCS coal for CP in NB for those coal loader derrick contraptions came by boxcar from local mines too.


Charles Peck
 

If I recall correctly (a big if), wasn't anthracite used as carbon filtration in water plants?
If so, fuel was not the only need for northeast hoppers far afield. 
Chuck Peck

On Sat, Dec 26, 2020 at 10:06 AM mrvant@... <mrvant@...> wrote:
A lot of western coal was shipped in boxcars on CP. Prairie towns had coal merchants’ bins with the trackside loading bins even with a boxcar floor and the coal was shovelled into them. OCS coal for CP in NB for those coal loader derrick contraptions came by boxcar from local mines too.


David
 

It's about time to point out that PRR didn't really do much in the Pennsylvania anthracite regions; the vast majority of PRR coal was regular old bituminous.

David Thompson


 

Chuck,

You bring up a point that I am very interested in: Carbon used for filtration in water plants. I model the B&O's Georgetown Branch ca 1945-55, and include the Dalecarlia Water Treatment Plant which sat next to the Potomac River at the MD/DC line. Various chemicals were delivered there and a plan of the overhead bridge structure used to transport raw materials at the plant has a tube labeled "Carbon." I have been thinking about this for the last week or so when I discovered it and am interested in understanding how this material was produced, where it was produced and how it was transported. I imagine it came in a very fine granular form, much like you see it today in your water filters, and small enough to be pumped through the 3" pipe at the filtration plant, by air pressure. Covered hopper? Tank cars? Box cars?

I wrote a blog post about my findings, here: http://gbblog.sluggyjunx.com/2020/12/18/commodities-dalecarlia-water-treatment-plant which includes some diagrams and aerial photos. Here is a visual from 1956 showing the yard:


Photo by R. Mumford, from my collection of scans.

Thanks to anyone who may shed some light on this. 

Best,
--
Ben Sullivan
Brookeville, MD