Removing lettering from Branchline cars?


mopacfirst
 

There are a few posts in the archive with questions about the best methods to remove lettering from Branchline cars, but not a solid answer that I've been able to find.  My desire is to remove small areas of the lettering, such as the car number, without damaging the car's paint.  I experimented with a couple of common liquid hobby products a number of years ago and ended up removing the paint entirely.  Unfortunately I don't remember what I used.

I've done it crudely using light scraping and sanding, but that's often not pretty.

Ron Merrick


Bernd Schroeder
 

Ron,

one method I have used with success on some models (but not Branchline so far) is as follows:

- cover only the lettering to be removed with a piece of paper towel
- soak the paper towel w decal setting solution
wait until it dries and resoak (I use Solvaset...)
- after 30 minutes remove the paper towel and try to remove the lettering by applying some tape to it
- if necessary, repeat the process
- do not use mechanical methods in the process unless you intend to do heavy weathering....

Bernd

Adelsdorf, Germany

--
Diese Nachricht wurde von meinem Android Mobiltelefon mit GMX Mail gesendet.
Am 25.01.22, 14:48 schrieb mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>:

There are a few posts in the archive with questions about the best methods to remove lettering from Branchline cars, but not a solid answer that I've been able to find.  My desire is to remove small areas of the lettering, such as the car number, without damaging the car's paint.  I experimented with a couple of common liquid hobby products a number of years ago and ended up removing the paint entirely.  Unfortunately I don't remember what I used.

I've done it crudely using light scraping and sanding, but that's often not pretty.

Ron Merrick


Jay Styron
 

Ron,
A Micro Mark fiberglass brush sometimes works.
https://www.micromark.com/Mini-Brush-with-Fiberglass-Bristles
-Jay Styron


Craig Wilson
 

Here is a technique that I have used:  a hand cleaner that contains pumice (brand name "GoJo").  A small amount is applied using a cotton-tip swab - like a Q-tip although I avoid the ones with a flexible plastic "handle."  I have found swabs with wooden shafts in the paint section of a hardware store and they work much better.

Apply the GoJo and GENTLY scrub using the swab.  If the underlying paint starts to be removed it will show up on the cotton swab.  I keep a dish of distilled water handy to rinse off the cleaning solution.  Sometimes it takes repeated applications to remove the lettering satisfactorily.  In some cases I have used this technique first then applied a wash of Solvaset scrubbing it with a fresh swab and/or stiff paint brush.  If the lettering doesn't come off after a few minutes of GENTLE scrubbing, it is time to try something else.

Craig Wilson


Tim O'Connor
 

Bernd

this (your method) is the best method to start with

removing lettering on old Front Range cars was the hardest I have found
It's ironic because the paint job would slough off with a wash of Accupaint
thinner - so you were left with an unpainted, lettered car :-)


On 1/25/2022 9:44 AM, Bernd Schroeder wrote:
Ron,

one method I have used with success on some models (but not Branchline so far) is as follows:

- cover only the lettering to be removed with a piece of paper towel
- soak the paper towel w decal setting solution
wait until it dries and resoak (I use Solvaset...)
- after 30 minutes remove the paper towel and try to remove the lettering by applying some tape to it
- if necessary, repeat the process
- do not use mechanical methods in the process unless you intend to do heavy weathering....

Bernd

Adelsdorf, Germany

--
Diese Nachricht wurde von meinem Android Mobiltelefon mit GMX Mail gesendet.
Am 25.01.22, 14:48 schrieb mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>:
There are a few posts in the archive with questions about the best methods to remove lettering from Branchline cars, but not a solid answer that I've been able to find.  My desire is to remove small areas of the lettering, such as the car number, without damaging the car's paint.  I experimented with a couple of common liquid hobby products a number of years ago and ended up removing the paint entirely.  Unfortunately I don't remember what I used.

I've done it crudely using light scraping and sanding, but that's often not pretty.

Ron Merrick

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


mopacfirst
 

I like the fiberglass brush idea.  I already use one of those for cleaning off the 'blackening' on weathered rail.  I'll try the paper towel with Solvaset trick also.

In most cases the renumbering is the same number of digits and identical lettering size as what's there now, so the new lettering and some light weathering makes the new decal numbering sort of disappear.  I've done some with scraping and sanding, and it's not too bad but not that great either.

All for building ten or more Branchline cars from a given series where four numbers were produced in the original run.  I should note that this occurs, for me, on Stewart three-bay offset-side hoppers also, but for the hoppers, since the cars are black, I have no trouble matching the paint with a little masking.

Ron Merrick


Robert kirkham
 

Something else to try is one of those orange based hand cleaners.  I’ve found putting a blob of the stuff over lettering on some brands of cars is enough in, say, an hour, to soften just the lettering and allow it to wipe away with a soft paint brush and water.  But it doesn’t work on a lot of other lettering.

Rob 

On Jan 25, 2022, at 9:15 AM, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

I like the fiberglass brush idea.  I already use one of those for cleaning off the 'blackening' on weathered rail.  I'll try the paper towel with Solvaset trick also.

In most cases the renumbering is the same number of digits and identical lettering size as what's there now, so the new lettering and some light weathering makes the new decal numbering sort of disappear.  I've done some with scraping and sanding, and it's not too bad but not that great either.

All for building ten or more Branchline cars from a given series where four numbers were produced in the original run.  I should note that this occurs, for me, on Stewart three-bay offset-side hoppers also, but for the hoppers, since the cars are black, I have no trouble matching the paint with a little masking.

Ron Merrick