Topics

Rivets Revisited


golden1014
 

Guys,

A few days ago we talked briefly about rivets on models. I heard a few very interesting comments that need clarification.

I'm wanting to build HO models of Seaboard Air Line high- and low-side gondolas, ca. 1950. While I never want or expect to be called a "rivet-counter", I won't build the models unless I get the rivet pattern right. I want the models to be "Westerfield Quality" and so the rivets and braces have to be quality stuff. The plan is to build masters here at home and then cast the car parts so I can mass-produce them (and share them with interested parties).

Here's the Question: Since I am too cheap to buy a NWSL Riveter, what's the best way to make rivets? In the past, I've used a small hobby screwdriver with a ground-down head to emboss rivets into plastic and brass. But somebody mentioned last week that you can "tape" or "glue" on rivets. That sounds interesting and worth a try. Could you smart guys (no pun intended) fill me in on your techniques--any and all techniques--you use to make rivets on HO models?

Thanks in advance!

John



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byronrose@...
 

On Sat, 7 Apr 2001 11:44:31 -0700 (PDT) John Golden
<golden1014@yahoo.com> writes:

Guys,

Here's the Question: Since I am too cheap to buy a NWSL Riveter,
what's the best way to make rivets? In the past, I've used a small
hobby screwdriver with a ground-down head to emboss rivets into
plastic and brass. But somebody mentioned last week that you can
"tape" or "glue" on rivets. That sounds interesting and worth a
try. Could you smart guys (no pun intended) fill me in on your
techniques--any and all techniques--you use to make rivets on HO
models?
John,

Bust your budget and buy the last years worth of Mainline Modelers and
read Hundmans series on riveting with a rivet plate. It may prove to be
a better system than the Riveter, which has some serious drawbacks when
you need to make more than a single row of rivets.

Cutting and gluing individual rivets is not for the faint of heart or
weak of eye. If you don't have an "artistic eye," whatever that is, you
will be wasting your time. It requires you to pop rivets into the exact
place on the first pop and get them all equally spaced and in a straight
line. Trust me on this, the plate, even in it's unproven state, has far
greater potential for a novice.

But where are there multitudes of rivets to make for that SAL box car?
You should be able to "borrow" parts from a Red Caboose X-29 for the end
and roof. Or am I missing something here?

BSR
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westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

I want the models to be "Westerfield Quality" and I am too cheap to buy a
NWSL Riveter>
John
John - The first thing I did when I decided to get into the business was to
buy the NWSL riveter and table. Believe me, it's worth the money.
- Al Westerfield


Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

John - The first thing I did when I decided to get into the
business was to
buy the NWSL riveter and table. Believe me, it's worth the money.
- Al Westerfield
I routinely have two problems with the Riveter: the punch often doesn't
strike the die straight on (an no amount of fiddling sems to fix it) and on
those occasions when things do line up and stay that way I find myself
applying varying pressure so as to form rivets of different sizes. I'm
ready to try the shave & glue method....

Dave Nelson