Topics

Rust-Oleum Dead Flat Clear Finish


Martin Young
 

My model painting is N Scale but the same ideas are there. I use an Iwata double action brush with the paint cup on top. A few years ago I bought at Sears a compressor with a ten gallon air tank. Filling it is noisy but once filled I turn off the compressor and just use the air in the tank. I have a regulator to control the amount of air I get. Plus the air from the tank is cool. I generally had the most problems when painting directly from a compressor. The air is warm and things happen.

Marty
San Diego, CA

---- "tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

How many guys here use spray cans to paint their HO Scale equipment? In
today's world why wouldn't you have acquired even the most economic airbrush?


Show of hands...

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean


In a message dated 1/15/2017 3:12:25 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
STMFC@... writes:




At yesterday's Great Train Show I talked with Joel Bragdon, the weathering
powder entrepreneur, about base and finish coatings for use with chalks
and powders.
He mentioned that Rust-Oleum announced a new coating last March called
"Dead Flat Clear" and that he likes the product. Here is a photo link:
http://tinyurl.com/jnou4lu
I did a little searching and found that Home Depot and Lowe's both carry
it.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA




Clark Propst
 

Are those using rattle cans to paint their fine models the same ones that spend big bucks on the tools needed to build them? If so - Weird!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Bruce Smith
 

Clark,

Results, not prejudice, indicate that rattle cans can produce superlative outcomes.  I have by no means ditched the airbrush, but the rattle can is another tool in a wide armamentarium of tools to get the job done.  As I noted, I use them on all of my brass PRR models for a base black (under DGLE) as well as the final coat on all black areas (passenger car roofs, underbodies, trucks, locomotive and tender frames and running gear).  In my hands, the Model Master brand spray bombs are an efficient, cost effective, time saving, high quality approach to getting the job done… and unlike specific model paints, I can buy them at my local USA Hobbies or Hobby Lobby.

Next up is a Tichy ACL 76000 series flat car that will get the spray bomb treatment after grit blasting.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 17, 2017, at 9:18 AM, cepropst@q.com [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



Are those using rattle cans to paint their fine models the same ones that spend big bucks on the tools needed to build them? If so - Weird!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


John Sykes III
 

Yuz gize stole one of my top secrets!!!

About a month before the CCB Meet, I gave a presentation at my club on "Non-traditional Paints".

My favorite brand is Krylon (I like the trigger action on the Krylon paints better than RustOleum -- I do use RustOleum dark grey automotive sandable primer for the base of my yards, under the cinders.  However, I found that the Krylon paint from WalMart is different from the Krylon paint at Ace Hardware.  The Ace versions I like -- not so the WalMart versions (note they have different SKUs and variety names on either).

For $4.99 a can (12 oz) it is a hellova deal over the 4 oz Model Masters or 6 oz Scalecoat II, the latter at $9.95 a can.  I often have trouble getting that last oz of paint out of a can of Model Masters, too.

My favorite colors are the Krylon primers, which are dead flat.  Including black primer, oxide red primer (which is very near to Floquil oxide red), grey primer (a medium true grey), and white primer.  I have been using these on all the buildings I am constructing for my layout (with some Model Masters & SCII).

One other Krylon color I use a lot is their Metallics "Dull Aluminum".  Works great for any galvanized surface such as freight car roofs, corrugated siding and roofs on buildings, etc. (with appropriate weathering).

I do weather mainly by airbrush, so use a 10% mix of paint to lacquer thinner with various colors for weathering, such as grimy black (PRR), or Steve Hoxie's favorite, roof brown.

-- John

P.S.  I got back from Cocoa incubating one hell of a cold.  Been basically bed ridden for 5 days now.  Got to go pick up an Rx at WalMart this afternoon.  Anyone else catch anything?


O Fenton Wells
 

I got back from Cocoa with a doozie of a stomach virus.  Lost 12 pounds since the Monday after.  Of course I needed to lose weight but not that way.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


naptownprr
 

Chuck,

When you write ACE, do you mean the brand of paint or the hardware store?

Jim


From: STMFC@... on behalf of 'Chuck Cover' chuck.cover@... [STMFC]
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2017 10:12 AM,


To: STMFC@...
Sub [STMFC] Re: Rust-Oleum Dead Flat Clear Finish
 
 

For all of my projects, locomotives, freight cars and structures, I first use a spray can of flat black as a primer.  I have used various brands including ACE and Rust-Oleum.  For the finish color I will use the air brush when I have an acceptable color available.  I favor the left over Floquil that I have horded and Scalecoat.  I do not like to use acrylic paints in the airbrush.

 

I recently found ACE  red oxide primer to be a reasonable FCC for PRR rolling stock.  I use a spray booth for all solvent based painting and adhesives.  The spray booth is next to a double hung window that I removed the screen from and put in a piece of plywood with a vent for the spray booth.  When I use the spray booth, I open the window and attach the exhaust to the vent.  When I am done, just disconnect the exhaust and close t! he window.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM  


Bill Welch
 

I have used the Microscale Clear Coats for 20+ years, flat and gloss, thinned about 50/50 w/Distilled water. Sprayed w/a Badger 155 Anthem siphon feed AB w/.75 needle/nozzle combo at 20 PSI.

Recently however I did try some Vallejo Model Air flat with good results.

Bill Welch


mopacfirst
 

I've been using an airbrush since 1970, probably painted 400 to 500 cars with them, first using cans of Propel until I could afford an airbrush.  My first couple hundred freight cars that I painted are now in a box, because they're Athearn blue box, which is all there was at the time, and the Floquil colors were all I had, back in the days when there was only one boxcar red.

Today I'm between airbrushes, because my Wren finally gave up the ghost.  I haven't needed one quite as much in the last few years because I've been building so many cars like Branchline where the lettering and the color are finally good enough.  But I still need to paint trucks, underbody details, couplers, etc., so starting ten or fifteen years or more ago I used the Floquil rattle can for a lot of stuff that wasn't a special color.

I'm just about out of almost all the colors now, but I have been able to get the Scalecoat II paints (yes, I agree the nozzles are better than Floquil) and there are a better selection of freight car colors that I actually use. 

Soon I'll need to buy a new airbrush, and I'll buy a new compressor to go with it, because I've got some stuff under construction that will need colors that don't come in a can.  But I have had several years worth of backlog that didn't need airbrushing, so I've gone with the flow.

I can use some king of flat overspray if I don't like the gloss, but usually those detail parts just get oversprayed with the rest of the car, so no big deal.

And yes, I have painted entire resin cars with spray cans, but mostly black, and I can't tell the difference after a bit of weathering. 

Ron Merrick


Greg Martin
 

Ron,

When you are ready to invest, go online and print out a 40% off one coupon from Hobby Lobby and buy the one that best fits you, they have several. IF it were me it would be a Pasche as they have parts available for them in the store.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
Ron Merrick writes:

 
Soon I'll need to buy a new airbrush, and I'll buy a new compressor to go with it, because I've got some stuff under construction that will need colors that don't come in a can.  But I have had several years worth of backlog that didn't need airbrushing, so I've gone with the flow.