Topics

Rusty rivets?

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Archer rivets and their clones have changed the way many of us approach kitbashing and scratchbuilding.  But while looking at some prototype photos for current projects I noticed that what I really need are rust colored rivets, and they need to be applied after painting the car.  I know most of you apply the rivets then paint the car, but I model post-1960 for the most part, when most riveted cars would have lost the paint over the rivets.  Paint doesn't stick to rivets well, and that isn't just a post-1960 problem.

Thoughts?

Scott Chatfield

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Scott,

How about a teeny-tiny 00000 spotting brush, some thinned rust-colored acrylic paint, an Optivisor (for those of us older than Elvis) and a lot of patience?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 9/30/2019 12:26 AM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:
Archer rivets and their clones have changed the way many of us approach kitbashing and scratchbuilding.  But while looking at some prototype photos for current projects I noticed that what I really need are rust colored rivets, and they need to be applied after painting the car.  I know most of you apply the rivets then paint the car, but I model post-1960 for the most part, when most riveted cars would have lost the paint over the rivets.  Paint doesn't stick to rivets well, and that isn't just a post-1960 problem.

Thoughts?

Scott Chatfield

Bob Webber
 

Do the same method as some use for wood. Paint an uneven coat of your favorite "rust", apply minute dabs of rubber cement, paint and finish the top coats, carefully sand or otw expose (and remove the cement) the protruding "rivets" - as much as little as the application requires.

At 11:26 PM 9/29/2019, you wrote:
Archer rivets and their clones have changed the way many of us approach kitbashing and scratchbuilding. But while looking at some prototype photos for current projects I noticed that what I really need are rust colored rivets, and they need to be applied after painting the car. I know most of you apply the rivets then paint the car, but I model post-1960 for the most part, when most riveted cars would have lost the paint over the rivets. Paint doesn't stick to rivets well, and that isn't just a post-1960 problem.

Thoughts?

Scott Chatfield
Bob Webber

 

Hmm. Maybe email the folks at Archer and ask them for some rust coloured rivet decals?

Colin ‘t Hart
Frösön, Sweden

Dennis Storzek
 

I happen to disagree with Scott's basic premise; that rivets are more likely to lose their paint than the surrounding metal, but for modeling rivets that have either been involved in a sideswipe or replaced and not painted, the solution is pretty easy, simply dry brush them with rust colored paint on one of those foam pad brushes, making sure it's dry enough that it only transfers paint to the raised bumps and not the base surface. One swipe and done.

Dennis Storzek

Tim O'Connor
 


I have often used colored pencils to highlight rivets... takes just a few minutes
Artist pencils are easy to use, sharp enough for tiny things, are really cheap, don't
dry out, etc.



On 9/30/2019 4:49 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
Scott,

How about a teeny-tiny 00000 spotting brush, some thinned rust-colored acrylic paint, an Optivisor (for those of us older than Elvis) and a lot of patience?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 9/30/2019 12:26 AM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:
Archer rivets and their clones have changed the way many of us approach kitbashing and scratchbuilding.  But while looking at some prototype photos for current projects I noticed that what I really need are rust colored rivets, and they need to be applied after painting the car.  I know most of you apply the rivets then paint the car, but I model post-1960 for the most part, when most riveted cars would have lost the paint over the rivets.  Paint doesn't stick to rivets well, and that isn't just a post-1960 problem.

Thoughts?

Scott Chatfield


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Sep 30, 2019, at 01:49, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:

Scott,

How about a teeny-tiny 00000 spotting brush, some thinned rust-colored acrylic paint, an Optivisor (for those of us older than Elvis) and a lot of patience?
The Instrctables web site has a project for a low cost CAD/CAM PC board router using a hand rotary tool like the Dremel. Modify it to manipulate a paintbrush.

^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!( @|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G

rick60123
 

I've been following military modelers and car modelers to learn some of the techniques they use that might be helpful.  One technique I have found useful and I would offer for rusty rivets is to put a few drops of paint on a piece of styrene and use the end of a toothpick to apply paint to each rivet.  This is much easier than using a fine brush or dry brushing.  I have been surprised at how much more control I have for applying small dots of paint.  FWIW

Have fun!!

Rick Mink
Burleson, Texas

mel perry
 

nolan:
went thru the entire paint brush category,
no luck, what category is this item
located in, there are literally hundreds
of items
thanks
mel perry

On Mon, Sep 30, 2019, 4:48 PM Nolan Hinshaw via Groups.Io <cearnog=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
On Sep 30, 2019, at 01:49, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:

> Scott,
>
> How about a teeny-tiny 00000 spotting brush, some thinned rust-colored acrylic paint, an Optivisor (for those of us older than Elvis) and a lot of patience?

The Instrctables web site has a project for a low cost CAD/CAM PC board router using a hand rotary tool like the Dremel. Modify it to manipulate a paintbrush.

^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!(      @|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G