Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

Really nice weathering, Charlie, as on all your cars. But, we need to have a discussion about weathering wheels. Rusty wheel plates is a modern, post roller bearing thing. Solid bearings used a 'total loss' lube system, where after the oil was drawn up between the axle and bearing, a portion migrated out the back of the journal box (there was no oil seal) where ti was flung out on the face of the wheel. Of course, anything oily in a dusty environment quickly builds a coating of oily grunge. Those cast iron wheels might have started out rusty, but they didn't stay that way long.

What is everyone's favorite wheel color?

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 


I call it "muck" or "really mucky muck" :-)

The last 3 wheels on this B&O wheel flat are the color I use for most wheels. I usually use
a touch of "rusty muck" on the back side of the wheels and on the inner axle.

Tim

What is everyone's favorite wheel color?
Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Nelson Moyer
 

I started out painting wheel faces a dark rusty color mixed from Floquil Rust and Roof Brown. The backs of the wheels were painted the same as the faces. Then I scrubbed powdered black chalk onto the wheel faces to blacken them. Chalk scrubbing is a dirty business, so I always did wheels separately before putting them into the side frames. After Floquil went away, I switched to Model Master Skin Tone Dark Tint as the base color for the front face, and Model Master Dark Tan for the rest. I used black Pan Pastel for the finish when I weathered the car. I have enough Model Master to last a lifetime, since my roster is nearly complete.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

 

Really nice weathering, Charlie, as on all your cars. But, we need to have a discussion about weathering wheels. Rusty wheel plates is a modern, post roller bearing thing. Solid bearings used a 'total loss' lube system, where after the oil was drawn up between the axle and bearing, a portion migrated out the back of the journal box (there was no oil seal) where ti was flung out on the face of the wheel. Of course, anything oily in a dusty environment quickly builds a coating of oily grunge. Those cast iron wheels might have started out rusty, but they didn't stay that way long.

What is everyone's favorite wheel color?

Dennis Storzek

 


Charlie Duckworth
 

I mix my black dry pigments with paint thinner and a little brown and paint the outside of the wheels; it drys black pretty quickly.  

On Sun, Jun 12, 2022 at 7:26 PM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer_at_hotmail.com_Worth51@...> wrote:
I started out painting wheel faces a dark rusty color mixed from Floquil Rust and Roof Brown. The backs of the wheels were painted the same as the faces. Then I scrubbed powdered black chalk onto the

I started out painting wheel faces a dark rusty color mixed from Floquil Rust and Roof Brown. The backs of the wheels were painted the same as the faces. Then I scrubbed powdered black chalk onto the wheel faces to blacken them. Chalk scrubbing is a dirty business, so I always did wheels separately before putting them into the side frames. After Floquil went away, I switched to Model Master Skin Tone Dark Tint as the base color for the front face, and Model Master Dark Tan for the rest. I used black Pan Pastel for the finish when I weathered the car. I have enough Model Master to last a lifetime, since my roster is nearly complete.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

 

Really nice weathering, Charlie, as on all your cars. But, we need to have a discussion about weathering wheels. Rusty wheel plates is a modern, post roller bearing thing. Solid bearings used a 'total loss' lube system, where after the oil was drawn up between the axle and bearing, a portion migrated out the back of the journal box (there was no oil seal) where ti was flung out on the face of the wheel. Of course, anything oily in a dusty environment quickly builds a coating of oily grunge. Those cast iron wheels might have started out rusty, but they didn't stay that way long.

What is everyone's favorite wheel color?

Dennis Storzek

 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Tony Thompson
 

Nowadays I prefer Tamiya “German Grey” for wheel faces.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Todd Sullivan
 

I do most of my weathering with acrylic paints, ustabe Polyscale, now craft acrylics (not my favorite paint, but cheap and available).  For solid bearing trucks' wheel faces, I start out with black, and add a bit of BCR and a tiny touch of orange for the faces.   My goal is a not-quite-black look that has a brownish tone for the outer faces.  The inner wheel faces and axles get a more orange tone that is lighter, based on various field observations and photos.  I try to harmonize that color with the color of the underbody, since I figure they would all be getting the same coating of guck.

I agree that rusty wheel faces are a modern thing, and when I see them on a model freight car from the steam era, I know the modeler isn't looking carefully at photos of the prototype.  That's not meant to be a jab at anyone, it's just that I learned along time ago, on the advice of modelers who were more accomplished than I, that consulting photos is really important.

Todd Sullivan


Eric Hansmann
 

I use Polly Scale Railroad Tie as the base color. Eventually, this bottle will be empty and I’ll need to find a replacement color. 

After the paint dries, I swirl PanPastel neutral grey extra dark on the outer wheel face. I posted details on my blog a couple months ago. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On Jun 12, 2022, at 9:06 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

I do most of my weathering with acrylic paints, ustabe Polyscale, now craft acrylics (not my favorite paint, but cheap and available).  For solid bearing trucks' wheel faces, I start out with black, and add a bit of BCR and a tiny touch of orange for the faces.   My goal is a not-quite-black look that has a brownish tone for the outer faces.  The inner wheel faces and axles get a more orange tone that is lighter, based on various field observations and photos.  I try to harmonize that color with the color of the underbody, since I figure they would all be getting the same coating of guck.

I agree that rusty wheel faces are a modern thing, and when I see them on a model freight car from the steam era, I know the modeler isn't looking carefully at photos of the prototype.  That's not meant to be a jab at anyone, it's just that I learned along time ago, on the advice of modelers who were more accomplished than I, that consulting photos is really important.

Todd Sullivan


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Sun, Jun 12, 2022 at 02:22 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
What is everyone's favorite wheel color?
Answering my own question, I liker Floquil Grimy Black with a touch of Floquil Earth mixed in to warm it up... More earth if the car had just arrived via the Milwaukee Road :-)

Dennis Storzek


Rich Gibson
 

I take some shade of black (oily, weathered, pure, etc.) and add a drop or two of some tan/brown. Every small batch I mix is slightly different and enough for a few cars, so that there is no constant color. I brush paint the wheel faces and side frames while they are on the car. Later, when I weather the car body with Pan Pastels, I brush the trucks with whatever color pigment I’m using for the splatter coming from below, usually Raw Umber, so that everything blends together. 


Todd Sullivan
 

Dennis,

That's interesting about the MILW arrivals.  Did the MILW have more mud in its ballast?

Todd Sullivan


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Mon, Jun 13, 2022 at 08:36 AM, Todd Sullivan wrote:
That's interesting about the MILW arrivals.  Did the MILW have more mud in its ballast?
Todd, I'm just tweaking someone's tail, so to speak, but yes, the steam era MILW was ballasted with gravel. I shouldn't be so smug... so was the Soo. In fact, during our era of interest a lot of RR mileage was ballasted with gravel, often "bank run" gravel which included a lot of clay and sand. So to my mind the dominant weathering color for underbodies should have a sandy tanish tone.

Dennis Storzek