Topics

Salt weathering


Eric Hansmann
 

John Golden shares his salt weathering techniques and results in the latest Resin Car Works blog post. 
http://blog.resincarworks.com/salt-weathering/


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Jim Betz
 

Eric,

  Thanks for sharing John Golden's step by step for salt weathering.

All,

  1)  When did the use of galvanized on roofs become ubiquitous?  I
       associate "peeling paint on the roof" with more modern cars.  Am
       I wrong?

  2) How common/uncommon would it be to see a galvanized roof
      combined with wood roof walks?

  3) John Golden mentions using a dark color for roof cement as a base
       color for salt weathering.  I don't associate dark roofs and peeling
       paint as common.  Am I wrong on that one?

  I suspect that many (most?) freight car models - especially those that
are RTR (or, for me, RTW = ready to weather because every car that I
consider ready to run is also weathered).  It seems like replacing
the roof walks is a common "to do" for our cars if they are the heavily
and accurately researched resin models.
                                                                                        - Jim


Dave Parker
 

If you search the archived messages for "galvanized roof", you get 268 hits.  So it seems like we have covered this topic in the past.

My two cents worth can be found in message 152181. 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Jim Betz
 


  ... having just spent almost 2 hours reading prior posts related to galvanized roofs
I will attempt to answer my own questions:

  1) Galvanized roofs were used for most metal roofs starting in the early part of
       the 20th century - and, for the most part, freight car roofs were metal (over
       a wood structure).

  2) Galvanized roofs were in use long before metal running boards.

  3) I did not find a lot of references to peeling paint on dark colors - but did note
      that more than one 'expert' commented how it was less likely to see
      peeling paint in the steam era than after.  The reasons given were varied
      but my reading of it is that it related as much to frequency of maintenance
      (re-painting) as anything else.  The presence of soot and quantities of same
      also had some part to play in this answer.

  All of these questions were aimed at answering "how often should I be using
salt weathering or other techniques to get the peeling paint effect?".  Since my
layout represents the period from just post WW-II to 1955 I have concluded
that I can answer that with "not often" and be OK with that answer for my
layout.

  None of the above is meant, in any way, to be a comment on how well (or
not) salt weathering represents peeling paint.
                                                                                  - Jim


Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

  1)  When did the use of galvanized on roofs become ubiquitous?  I
       associate "peeling paint on the roof" with more modern cars.  Am
       I wrong?

Yep. It was about 1910. You're closer to right about UNPAINTED galvanized.

  2) How common/uncommon would it be to see a galvanized roof
      combined with wood roof walks?

     In 1910 and thereafter? Universal.

Tony Thompson