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Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

Thanks Richard,

EORX 1910 was carrying propane gas, while 1956 was empty.

I looked up the NYC box cars on my list, 2 were loaded with zinc, 2
with rye, two others had loads of soybeans and barley each. My next
question is about the murphy roofs on these cars. Murphy roofs usually
don't go to the edge of the car side. On these cars it does, plus
there's a recessed area between the roof and the car side and the end
overhangs. Is this a hallmark of the Dispatch shops? I built a
Westerfield MC door and a half box car some time ago for a friend. I
don't recall the recessed area below the roof on that 'as built' model.
I think the rebuilt roof being unpainted is what's most appealing about
these cars.

Clark Propst


Richard Hendrickson
 

Clark Probst wrote:

...Murphy roofs usually
don't go to the edge of the car side. On these cars it does, plus
there's a recessed area between the roof and the car side and the end
overhangs. Is this a hallmark of the Dispatch shops?
No, it's a hallmark of the original (1920s) Murphy steel roofs. And though
later Murphy roofs with rectangular panels generally didn't have this
overhanging lip on box cars, they did (for some reason I'm unaware of) on
almost all refrigerator cars.

...I built a
Westerfield MC door and a half box car some time ago for a friend. I
don't recall the recessed area below the roof on that 'as built' model.
It was there, though, on both prototype and model. When NYC applied new
roofs to their USRA-design box cars, they kept the eaves the same and the
new roofs, like the original ones, had the overhanging lips at both sides
and ends.


Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520