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Seeing individual boards on Single Sheathed cars


Andy Carlson
 

Note that coupled to the right of WP 8078 is another 8051 series car. These cars were somewhat unique in that the lumber door was located in the 'B' end. The vertical shaft brake allowed plenty of room, so I suppose other cars of the same era could have been this way as well.

One use of photos, such as this one, is in viewing the relative use of good milled wood back then. Flat grain wood was a lesser premium than vertical grain wood, but back in those days the old growth timber commonly used made flat grain wood a much higher quality than the common young growth wood milled today.

Notice that the grooves on this elderly car are still quite tight. What delineates the boards is more the opening of the face of the grains due to flat wood's greater vulnerability to weathering. This is something that toolmaking would be challenged to duplicate--I think that this would be better replicated with painting.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

 


StephenK
 

I agree.   Almost all models of single sheath cars have grooves molded in to delineate separate boards, and those grooves are way too large.  As Andy says, those "grooves" just don't show in this photo.   The don't show up in most photos (and that goes for wooden passenger cars too.).  The Accurail single sheathed cars (4200, 4300, and 4500 series) do a much better job here--the casting shows boards at slightly different levels with no grooves between them.   As far as I'm concerned, they are the best in the business.

Steve Kay


Paul Doggett
 

The Tichy USRA boxcar really sets the standard for planking on boxcar sides in my humble opinion.

Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 22 Nov 2020, at 20:38, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:

I agree.   Almost all models of single sheath cars have grooves molded in to delineate separate boards, and those grooves are way too large.  As Andy says, those "grooves" just don't show in this photo.   The don't show up in most photos (and that goes for wooden passenger cars too.).  The Accurail single sheathed cars (4200, 4300, and 4500 series) do a much better job here--the casting shows boards at slightly different levels with no grooves between them.   As far as I'm concerned, they are the best in the business.

Steve Kay


np328
 

  Andy,
            here is a link to a Rock Island car photographed by John Vashon at the Minneapolis Pillsbury "A" Mill. 
https://www.loc.gov/resource/fsa.8a04504/       and the photo at a much higher resolution   https://tile.loc.gov/storage-services/service/pnp/fsa/8a04000/8a04500/8a04504v.jpg 

Gaps between the boards?  To quote Roger Rabbit - Pleeeeeaasse.    I'm not sure if it is a mastic oozing out however it is clearly proud of the surface.  Not gaps.  

Railroad house cars have sheathing to protect the commodity, as soon as they gets gaps or are warped to any great degree, the cars become practically worthless and generally speaking shippers would reject them.  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Jim Dick - Roseville, MN